University of Technology Sydney

96327 Leading Health and Social Care

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2021 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Health
Credit points: 6 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

This subject begins with a review of the rapid development of leadership theory in health and social care over the last decade, particularly, but not only, in response to major quality and safety inquiries across the health, aged care and disability fields. The subject moves through various theories and styles of leadership, drawing on empirical research and the arts (including film and literature) considering what leadership means to – and what it demands of - managers at the individual, team and organisational level. It looks at individual leadership and asks students to reflect on their current capabilities as a leader, while planning for their own personal development in this area. It then examines the leadership of teams, and in particular the issues faced by leaders of multidisciplinary teams in health and social care. It completes the leadership journey by considering how personal and team leadership differs from organisational leadership, and how leadership across organisations, and sectors, might be achieved.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:
A. Review and evaluate leadership theories and practices relevant to health and social care
B. Critically analyse problems in health and social services that require leadership as part of their solution
C. Examine your own leadership assumptions, approaches and preferences and their implications for your current or future role as a leader
D. Review leadership theories, models and approaches, and consider the issues associated with their application in health and social care contexts
E. Consider the implications of ethical leadership

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the following graduate attributes:

  • Are reflective critical thinkers who examine and contribute to practice, policy and research to achieve clinical excellence and enhance health outcomes (1.0)
  • Identify, synthesise, evaluate and apply the best available evidence for translation into practice to achieve optimal health outcomes (1.1)
  • Demonstrate comprehensive clinical judgement and clinical reasoning that is based on evidence and reflects relevant professional codes and guidelines (1.2)
  • Are visionary, innovative and responsive leaders (2.0)

Teaching and learning strategies

This subject is designed to assist students to understand the complexities associated with leadership in multidisciplinary health and or social care service environments. The lack of leadership has been associated with catastrophic failures in the quality and safety of care.

This subject is taught using a variety of teaching and learning strategies. The strategies used emphasise active and applied approaches to developing students’ ability to understand leadership at an individual, team, organisational and sector levels and apply this knowledge to generate effective, practical solutions to health system challenges. Understanding and critical thinking skills will be encouraged via a range of activities, including but not limited to:

  • Learning via online resources with active engagement opportunities with the subject content
  • Thought-provoking and interactive content that stimulates thinking, promotes understand and supports analysis and evaluation
  • Problem solving, discovery-based and critical thinking activities via a range of guided stepwise and self-directed learning opportunities.
  • Learning that is supported by real world examples, case studies, illustrations and data.
  • Opportunities for students to reflect on, explain and record their input under advice and guidance

Content (topics)

  • What is leadership and why does in matter in health and social care?
  • The impact of failures of leadership in health and social care
  • The development of leadership theory and styles
  • Classical and emerging leadership theories
  • Individual leadership capabilities and competencies
  • Leading teams in health and social care
  • Leading multidisciplinary teams
  • Leading organisations
  • Leadership, ethics and values
  • Diversity and leadership

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Recognising leadership

Intent:

This early, low-stakes assessment item focuses on your current understanding of effective leadership. Most people have conscious, or implicits views about what ‘makes’ a great leader. In this assessment we ask you to begin to reflect on your views, by indentifying and critically examining what effective leadership means to you.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A and D

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

1.0 and 2.0

Type: Essay
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 15%
Length:

750 words

Criteria:
  • 60% Provides a clear and succinct analysis of the leadership capabilities of the person chosen discussed in relation to leadership theory [Synth]
  • 30% Validates their choice of leader through correct interpretation of relevant and current literature [Eval]
  • 10% Produces correct grammar, spelling, formatting, style and reference list [Synth]

Assessment task 2: Leadership and followership

Intent:

Leadership is much, if not more, about followers as it is about leaders. In this assessment we ask you to consider the issues associated with leading diverse groups in health and or social care and the issues this might raise for leaders’ capabilities.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A, B and E

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

1.0, 1.1 and 1.2

Type: Essay
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 35%
Length:

1000 words

Criteria:
  • 30% Deconstructs the concept of followership in relation to leadership [Analy]
  • 30% Discusses the potential difficulties faced by leaders in health and social care using current evidence on leadership theory and the fields of health and social care [Synth]
  • 30% Outlines the issues in attracting and keeping followers using current evidence on leadership theory and the fields of health and social care [Synth]
  • 10% Produces correct grammar, spelling, formatting, style and reference list [Synth]

Assessment task 3: Crisis leadership

Intent:

This assessment item focuses on leadership during times of crisis. It considers the ethical and moral stances required of health and social care leaders, particularly, but not only during times of stress. This assessment will give you the opportunity to consider not only what leaders did or did not do during the COVID19 pandemic, but it will help you evaluate whether their actions made things better or worse, and for whom.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A, B and D

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

1.0, 1.1 and 2.0

Type: Case study
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 50%
Length:

2000 words

Criteria:
  • 20% Analyses and reframes the issues relating to leadership in the time of crisis demonstrating a depth of knowledge of their impact on patient safety and quality [Synth]
  • 20% Demonstrates an in-depth understanding of the ethical issues which arose as a result of the crisis as depicted in the case study[Eval]
  • 20% Identifies and evaluates government responses to the crisis and their implications for the general public and for health and social care
  • 20% Demonstrates clear alignment between the ethical issues raised by responses to the crisis and the implications for health and social care leaders
  • 10% Validates perspectives through correct interpretation of relevant and current literature [Eval]
  • 10% Produces correct grammar, spelling, formatting, style and reference list [Synth]

Other resources

UTS Student Centre
Building 10

Monday to Friday: 9am - 5pm
Tel: 1300 ASK UTS (1300 275 887)

Details for student centres: www.uts.edu.au/current-students/contacts/general-contacts

For other resources/ information refer to the Faculty of Health website (www.uts.edu.au/about/faculty-health) and Canvas at: https://canvas.uts.edu.au/.

UTS Library
The Library has a wide range of resources, facilities and services to support you including textbooks, subject readings, health literature databases, workshops and bookable study rooms. There is also a team of librarians to help you with your questions available via online chat, phone and in person. W: lib.uts.edu.au, Facebook: utslibrary, Twitter: @utslibrary Tel: (02) 9514 3666.

Improve Your Academic and English Language Skills
Marks for all assessment tasks such as assignments and examinations are given not only for what you write but also for how you write. If you would like the opportunity to improve your academic and English language skills, make an appointment with the HELPS (Higher Education Language & Presentation Support) Service in Student Services.

HELPS (Higher Education Language & Presentation Support)
HELPS provides assistance with English language proficiency and academic language. Students who need to develop their written and/or spoken English should make use of the free services offered by HELPS, including academic language workshops, vacation intensive courses, drop-in consultations, individual appointments and Conversations@UTS (www.ssu.uts.edu.au/helps). HELPS staff are also available for drop-in consultations at the UTS Library. Phone (02) 9514 9733.

Please see www.uts.edu.au for additional information on other resources provided to students by UTS.

The Accessibility and Financial Assistance Service
The Accessibility Service can support students with disabilities, medical or mental health conditions, including temporary injuries (e.g., broken limbs). The Accessibility Service works with Academic Liaison Officers in each Faculty to provide ‘reasonable adjustments’ such as exam provisions, assistive technology, requests and strategies for managing your studies alongside your health condition. If you’re unsure whether you need assistance, we recommend getting in touch early and we can provide advice on how our service can assist you. Make an appointment with an Accessibility Consultant (AC) on +61 2 9514 1177 or Accessibility@uts.edu.au.

The Financial Assistance Service can assist you with financial aspects of life at university, including Centrelink information, tax returns and budgeting, interest-free student loans and grants to assist with course-related costs. Check eligibility and apply online and make an appointment on +61 2 9514 1177 or Financial.assistance@uts.edu.au.