University of Technology Sydney

89200 Graphic Visualisation

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: Design
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Postgraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

This subject expands the awareness and ability of students from various disciplinary backgrounds to generate ideas and develop visual narratives and to communicate these by means of the visual communication media. There is special emphasis on drawing and image-making and the development of competencies in a range of basic techniques suitable for the representation and effective visual communication of animation and design ideas and solutions, including character design, layout and storyboarding. Students are encouraged to experiment with form in the visualisation of story and script ideas and to enhance their creative visual problem-solving skills. The subject provides students with the opportunity to acquire a critical understanding of the language of visual communication using simple linear form to construct graphic narratives and sequences for the comics and animation media.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. Develop competencies in a range of drawing techniques suitable for the simple representation and effective visual communication of graphic narrative ideas and concepts in comics and animation formats.
2. Demonstrate a range of graphic visualisation techniques suitable for character design and storytelling.
3. Demonstrate a willingness to experiment with visual form in the solution of design and narrative problems.
4. Become acquainted with a variety of design methodologies for the construction of visual sequences for storyboards including the straight-ahead and in-between approaches.
5. Acquire a critical understanding of the language of visual communication using linear form to construct graphic narrative in comics and animation formats.
6. Developed aesthetic sensibility
7. Analyse, synthesise and formulate complex ideas, and connect research process to final outcomes
8. Position work within a wider social and cultural context
9. Understand the ethical practice

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes:

  • Ability to undertake an ethical approach towards Animation. (A.2)
  • Ability to develop an international outlook, with the foundations and skills needed for the development of an international network (A.3)
  • Ability to understand and challenge animation design conventions (I.1)
  • Ability to produce inspirational responses in the integration of animation learning experiences (I.3)
  • Ability to innovatively use and apply animation technologies and materials (I.4)
  • Ability to demonstrate professional skills in Animation production (P.2)
  • Ability to make active connections between diverse forms of information through animation design research and analysis (R.2)

Teaching and learning strategies

This subject is comprised of a series of 3 hour studio-based workshops. Students will be participating in individual tutorials, group discussions and team-based activities throughout the semester. Activities will include demonstrations, presentations, seminars, visual tasks and exercises. The subject includes active learning experiences where ongoing feedback is provided weekly in on-campus engagements such as interactive lecture sessions, studios and computer labs. It is therefore imperative that students attend all on-campus engagements. In addition to this there is an expectation of approx. 5 hours of self-directed practice outside class for every 3 hours spent on campus.

This subject uses the problem-based learning strategy that involves students in researching and developing their own content and solutions in response to complex design challenges. In the studio sessions, students will work on their design projects with a professional designer as mentor. At the beginning of each studio the mentor will discuss with the entire group the challenges they are facing with their projects. The mentor will then prompt students faced by similar challenges to facilitate collaborative discussions. The mentor will be reviewing the work weekly and will provide feedback verbally. It is the students' responsibility to record any feedback provided in studio. During presentations students will be expected to actively participate in collaborative peer review feedback exercises.

Grades, marks and a summary of feedback on final design submissions will be provided through Review.

Content (topics)

The subject is largely organised around studio practice sessions that are supported by lectures covering the theoretical and practical examinations of the following topics:

· traditional tools and materials for drawing;

· experimental approaches to image-making;

· storytelling and visual language;

· approaches to visual problem solving;

· the language of comics;

· the human figure in still pose and movement;

· visualising sound and music;

· narrative sequencing in animation;

· character or object and storyboard design.

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Portfolio from First Stage of visual narrative development

Intent:

Refer to detailed brief

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2 and 3

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

I.1, I.3 and P.2

Type: Portfolio
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 30%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Carefully presented work in appropriate formats 25 1 P.2
Evidence of an imaginative approach to studio work (including all drawings and visual investigation processes) 25 2 I.3
Quality of experimentation undertaken in the development of studio work (including all drawings and visual investigation processes) 25 3 I.1
Posession of a developed aesthetic sensibility 25 3 I.3
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Portfolio from Second Stage of visual narrative development

Intent:

Refer to detailed brief

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 3 and 5

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

I.3, I.4, P.2 and R.2

Type: Portfolio
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 30%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Carefully presented work in appropriate formats 17 1 P.2
Capacity for perceptive concept development 17 5 I.4
Evidence of media sensitivity in the draft proposal design (including journal process work 17 5 I.4
How effectively the draft proposal communicate the narrative details of the story 17 5 I.4
Posession of a developed aesthetic sensibility 17 3 I.3
Ability to analyse, synthesise and formulate complex ideas, and connect research process to final outcomes 15 5 R.2
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 3: Finished art storyboard or graphic novel sequence

Intent:

Refer to detailed brief

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.2, A.3, I.3, I.4, P.2 and R.2

Type: Project
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 40%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Demonstrated narrative skills 12 1 I.3
Evidence of care and attention to detail and professional presentation 11 2 P.2
Evidence of imaginative approach 11 3 I.4
Manage project development including an effective use of time 11 4 P.2
Acquire a critical understanding of the language of visual communication using linear form to construct graphic narrative in comics and animation formats 11 5 I.3
Ability to position work within a wider social and cultural context 11 8 A.3
Understanding of ethical practice 11 9 A.2
Ability to analyse, synthesise and formulate complex ideas, and connect research process to final outcomes 11 7 R.2
Posession of a developed aesthetic sensibility 11 6 I.3
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Minimum requirements

The DAB attendance policy requires students to attend no less than 80% of formal teaching sessions (lectures and tutorials) for each class they are enrolled in to remain eligible for assessment.

The listed assessment tasks should be submitted on the due date/time. To pass an assessment, work submitted should show satisfactory achievement in all learning objectives.

Required texts

McCloud, Scott. Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art. Harper Perennial, New York, 1993

This essential text should either be purchased or accessed through closed reserve in the library.

Recommended texts

Edwards, Betty. The New Drawing On The Right Side Of The Brain, Jeremy P.Tarcher/Putnam, New York, 1999

McCloud, Scott. Making Comics: Storytelling Secrets of Comics, Manga and Graphic Novels. Harper, New York, 2006

These additional texts may be purchased or accessed through closed reserve in the library.

Additional notes will be supplied in class.

References

Blair, Preston. Cartoon Animation, Walter Foster, Laguna Hills, California, 1994

Edwards, Betty. Drawing On The Artist Within: A Guide to Innovation, Invention, Imagination and Creativity,

Fontana/Collins, Glasgow, 1988

Gravett, Paul. Manga: Sixty Years Of Japanese Comics, Laurence King, London, 2004

Hamm, Jack. Drawing And Cartooning For Laughs, Perigree, New York, 1990

Hamm, Jack. Drawing The Head And Figure, Perigree, New York, 1992

Inches, Alison. Jim Henson’s Designs And Doodles: A Muppet Sketchbook, Harry N. Abrams, New York, 2004

Nicolaides, Kimon. The Natural Way to Draw: A Working Plan for Art Study, Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 1969

Petroski, Henry. The Pencil: A History of Design and Circumstance, Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 1999

Tumminello, Wendy. Exploring Storyboarding, Thomson/Delmar Learning, New York, 2005

NOTE: The majority of these texts have been placed on Closed Reserve

See UTS Library- CITY CLOSED RESERVE: http://orac.lib.uts.edu.au/search/r?SEARCH=89200