University of Technology Sydney

81513 Past, Present, Future of Innovation

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Creative Intelligence and Innovation: Transdisciplinary Innovation
Credit points: 8 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

Requisite(s): 81512 Creative Practice and Methods OR 81540 Technology, Methods and Creative Practice OR 81538 Frame Innovation
There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

In this subject, students explore the nature of invention and innovation in the various fields of their core degrees. Through special projects (such as What would Buckminster Fuller do now?) students are provoked to examine the conceptual, methodological and empirical patterns of innovation leaders, and apply them to major contemporary issues. In this way, students develop insights into the cultural and social contexts of innovation in the past and present, and in the speculative future. Through the use of techniques such as scenario building, forecasting, backcasting and technology roadmapping, a diverse history of ideas is spanned to explore possible futures.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:

1. Discover, interrogate and visualise creative intelligence and innovation through studying the life of a particular person
2. Interpret, synthesise and model creative intelligence and innovation as understood and practiced across a variety of fields and disciplines
3. Develop strategies and pathways to enact these models in new contexts to address complex challenges
4. Design an alternative future system demonstrating an advanced understanding of its current state, detailing the context, resources, people and ideas that need to come together for innovation and change to occur
5. Explore methods, ideate and prototype to speculate on possible futures across a range of disciplines or fields, considering different worldviews and approaches to betterment

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject contributes specifically to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes:

  • Explore the relevance of patterns, frameworks, approaches and methods from different disciplines, professional practices or fields of inquiry for gaining insights into particular problems, proposals, practices, contexts and systems (CII.2.2)
  • Analyse problem situations or contexts from multiple disciplinary or personal perspectives and integrate findings in creative and useful ways (CII.2.3)
  • Test the value of different patterns, frameworks and methods for exploring and addressing complex challenges (CII.2.4)
  • Work within different community, organisational or cultural contexts to design and develop ideas, strategies and practices for betterment (CII.4.2)
  • Make decisions that recognise the humanity of others by engaging ethically and with sensitivity to the values of particular groups, communities, organisations or cultures (CII.4.3)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

The subject provides opportunities for you as a student to draw on various perspectives to identify the conditions that support innovation. You use these collective insights to develop a model for creative practice and innovation. In this subject you also examine an existing complex problem and use a range of speculative and creative methods to propose alternatives that can create positive change in the world. Finally, you examine ethical implications of your proposals from a range of perspectives.

So your experiences as a student in this subject support you to develop the following graduate attributes (GA):

  • GA 2 Create value in problem-solving and enquiry
  • GA 4 Imaginative and ethical citizenship

Teaching and learning strategies

This subject uses problem-based learning strategies that involves students in researching and developing their own / group solutions to complex problems / scenarios. This subject is studio-based. In each studio session students receive feedback and reflection from academics and industry professionals, whilst continuing to work on the problems / projects they are preparing and completing outside studio session times. Learning will take place in a collaborative, immersive, experiential, studio-based environment. Students will learn from academics and professionals across a wide range of disciplines, undertaking real briefs for real clients in real time.

Content (topics)

* Innovation past

* Innovation present

* Innovation future

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Change maker's studio

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2 and 5

This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):

CII.2.2, CII.2.3 and CII.2.4

Type: Report
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 40%
Criteria:
  • Depth and breadth of exploration of CI Practice (past) (20%)
  • Effectiveness in extrapolating information from diverse fields to reveal, communicate and visualise findings about CI practice (30%)
  • Originality in articulating a future policy change (30%)
  • Depth of insight into personal ability to make change (20%)

Assessment task 2: Futures Design (2a and 2b)

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

3 and 4

This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):

CII.4.2 and CII.4.3

Type: Project
Groupwork: Group, group and individually assessed
Weight: 60%
Criteria:

2a

* Depth of critical and creative enquiry into the system being considered for change (20%)

* Originality, value and far-sightedness of solution(s) (20%)

* Persuasive communication of the value of the idea(s) (10%)

2b

* Effectiveness of approach to reveal insights about the proposed alternative system (20%)

* Coherence and perceptive exploration of a unique perspective / worldview (15%)

* Originality and creativity of expression (15%)

Minimum requirements

Students must attempt each assessment task and achieve an overall pass mark in order to pass this subject.

Late penalties apply to all assessment tasks as outlined in the FTDi FYI student booklet. Please consult this booklet for other useful information including Special Consideration, Plagiarism, Extension, and Student Support Services.

A minimum of 80% of attendance of classes (as outlined in the timetable) is required.

Required texts

Required texts

Please find (and reference) your own texts for Assessment 1 Part A - on your CI hero.

Watch the video on UTSonline and see Library LibGuide for ways to approach researching your CI hero. You can also check out these tips from previous students https://docs.google.com/document/d/1rZUjM32jVC2n3YTKs437lStsnMEFavqwbYdTKZol2xs/edit

The following background material will help you with Assessment 1 Part B on Policy

Mariana Mazzucato—Mission Oriented Research & Innovation in the EU https://publications.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/5b2811d1-16be-11e8-9253-01aa75ed71a1/language-en

The following background material will help you with Assessment 2 - links to these texts and more are available on Blackboard.

Rachel Botsman TED Talks – on how collaboration and trust enabled by digital technologies will change the way we live, work, bank and consume. https://www.ted.com/speakers/rachel_botsman

Art Brock—Designing Social Flows (and currencies) http://www.artbrock.com/blog/designing-social-flows-chapter-6-designing-incentives

Doughnut economics (Kate Raworth)

Diverse Economies Framework: http://www.communitypartnering.info/diverse25.html

Other resources

The following chapters are available as PDF eReadings from the UTS Library and can also be accessed via UTSOnline - they are all great background reading for the work we will be doing in Past, Present, Future of Innovation.

About the P2P Foundation https://p2pfoundation.net/the-p2p-foundation/about-the-p2p-foundation

Holochain https://holochain.org/

The MetaCurrency Project http://metacurrency.org/

Paul Mason: The future of capitalism (18 min video) https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=198&v=s5teO3W4LrM

Johnson, S. 2014. ‘Conclusion: the time travelers’, in How we got to now: six innovations that made the modern world, Particular Books, London, pp. 199-211.

Dunne, A. & Raby, F. 2013. ‘Chapter 5: A methodological playground: fictional worlds and thought experiments’, in Speculative everything: design, fiction, and social dreaming, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, pp. 69-88.

Dunne, A. & Raby, F. 2013. ‘Chapter 1: Beyond radical design,’ in Speculative everything: design, fiction, and social dreaming, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, pp. 1-9.

Dorst, K. 2013. Academic design, Inaugural lecture, Eindhoven University of Technology.

Verganti, R. 2009. ‘Chapter 2: Design and meanings: Innovating by making sense of things’, in Design driven innovation: changing the rules of competition by radically innovating what things mean, Harvard Business Press, Boston, pp. 19-38.

Mau, B., Leonard, J. & Institute Without Borders. 2004. ‘Now that we can do anything, what will we do?’ In Massive change, Phaidon, London, pp. 15-19.

How we got to now: http://video.pbs.org/program/how-we-got-now/

The history of ideas

What is hacking?

Gardner, H. 1993. Creating Minds, Basic Books, New York.

Rose, D. 2014. ‘Prologue: my nightmare’, in Enchanted objects: design, human desire, and the internet of things, Scribner, New York, pp. 1-13.

Rose, D. 2014. ‘Six future fantasies’, in Enchanted objects: design, human desire, and the internet of things, Scribner, New York, pp. 251-264.

Johnson, S. 2014. ‘Introduction: robot historian and the hummingbird’s wing,’ in How we got to now: six innovations that made the modern world, Particular Books, London, pp. 1-12.

Isaacson, W. 2014. The innovators: how a group of hackers, geniuses, and geeks created the digital revolution, Simon & Schuster, New York.

Futures Arena

Gartner’s predictions http://www.gartner.com/technology/research/predicts/

Deloitte’s predictions

  • http://bit.ly/1TGSshw
  • http://bit.ly/1Jd1iLU

Blog of Maria Ioia from Market Insights http://www.marketintelligenceagency.com.au/

Futurist, Ross Dawson’s blog http://rossdawson.com/keynote-speaker/keynote-speaker-videos/

Nate Silver (relies on quantitative data/ Big Data to predict future events) http://www.fastcompany.com/3009258/most-creative-people-2013/1-nate-silver

Speculative Everything (Anthony Dunne at Resonate 2013): https://vimeo.com/65074246