University of Technology Sydney

88416 Furniture Production and Materials

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2022 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: Design
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Undergraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

Description

This subject focuses on the development of the student's understanding of the design process as applied to furniture design. Students follow a methodology that includes concept generation through model making, design refinement and subsequently digital documentation and fabrication. Students are introduced to the environment of production through site visits. Lectures on developing structure, model making, ergonomics and production give the student an appreciation for design appropriateness and detailing. Students learn to produce accurate digital files for production of their furniture prototypes and finally assemble their own furniture designs with hand tools under supervision in the DAB workshop.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. Use iterative prototyping as a research method in the furniture design process.
2. Understand the fundamentals of how to create stable structures through application of theory and practice.
3. Develop an original aesthetic sensibility in furniture design.
4. Demonstrate industry specific analogue and digital skills in the creation of information for presentation and digital production.
5. Apply ergonomic principles to furniture designs

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes:

  • Effective tangible 3D representation (C.3)
  • Demonstration of versatility, curiosity and imagination (I.2)
  • Demonstration of aesthetic sensibility (I.3)
  • Accuracy, rigour and care (P.2)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

The term CAPRI is used for the five Design, Architecture and Building faculty graduate attribute categories where:

C = communication and groupwork

A = attitudes and values

P = practical and professional

R = research and critique

I = innovation and creativity.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs) are linked to these categories using codes (e.g. C-1, A-3, P-4, etc.).

Teaching and learning strategies

This subject uses a problem based learning strategy that involves students in researching and developing their own solutions to complex design challenges. The subject uses design professionals as studio leaders to ensure that all content and tasks are relevant to current professional practice in a global context.

This subject includes active and collaborative learning experiences where ongoing feedback is provided weekly in all on campus and online engagements such as lectures, studios, workshops and computer labs. It is therefore imperative that students prepare for and attend all on campus engagements according to the Program.

Lectures will provide contextual and theoretical knowledge relevant to the subject that will enable students to work on their design projects effectively. The information provided concerns furniture design precedents, structure, manufacturing and materials to develop the core elements of furniture design practice. Lectures will be provided in a logical order that suports the individual student's design process. Weekly lecture topics are listed in the Program and all supplementary learning resources are available in UTSOnlline.

In studio, students will work on their design projects with a studio leader. At the beginning of each studio the studio leader will discuss with the entire group the challenges they are facing with their projects. The studio leader will then prompt students faced by similar challenges to form small groups to facilitate collaborative discussions. During and following each weekly studio, students will be required to prepare models, drawings and questions for the studio leader relatied to their own furniture design project.The studio leader will be reviewing design process work weekly and will provide critical feedback verbally. It will be the students responsibly to record any feedback provided in studio. During pin-up presentations, students will be expected to actively participate in collaborative peer review feedback exercises.

Computer labs are provided to support students in the development of their designs for digital production. Prior to each computer lab, students will be required to prepare questions for the studio leader in relation to the design projects they are working on.

Workshop classes will be held online and in the DAB Fabrication Workshop on level 2. Students will be supported by studio leaders and workshop technical staff in construction of their models and prototypes.

Feedback

Verbal feedback will be provided through face-to-face informal design reviews and pin-ups weekly to strengthen the iterative design process. It will be a student's responsibility to make a record of any feedback provided. Grades, marks and supplementary feedback on final design submissions will be provided through Review.

Content (topics)

This subject addresses the following issues and topics:

a) Properties of materials

b) Production and manufacturing processes

c) Connections and assembly techniques

d) Production files and documentation

e) Form, structure and ergonomics

f) Prototype construction

g) Design process and presentation

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Concept development Phase and Crafted Joint explorations

Intent:

Produce a furniture design concept through a process of iterative prototyping.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2 and 5

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

I.2, I.3 and P.2

Type: Design/drawing/plan/sketch
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 40%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Depth of exploration shown in the construction of your sketch model series 50 1 I.2
Degree of accuracy and stability achieved in the construction of your 1:1 scale cardboard prototype the craft exercises 25 2 P.2
Degree of ergonomic and functional sensibility achieved in your 1:1 scale cardboard prototype 25 5 I.3
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Concept development Phase and Crafted Joint explorations

Intent:

Progress a funiture design from concept level through to production as a finished prototype

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

2, 3, 4 and 5

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

C.3, I.3 and P.2

Type: Design/drawing/plan/sketch
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 60%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Overall and detail aesthetics 25 3 I.3
Modularity development/considerations and multi-functionality of the design solution 25 4 C.3
Degree of ergonomic and functional sensibility and quality achieved in your 1:1 prototype 25 5 I.3
Appropriateness of material selection and quality of construction 25 2 P.2
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Minimum requirements

The DAB attendance policy requires students to attend no less than 80% of formal teaching sessions (lectures and tutorials) for each class they are enrolled in to remain eligible for assessment.

Recommended texts

Böhm, F. KGID: Konstantin Grcic Industrial Design (Phaidon, London, 2005).

Jackson, P. Folding techniques for designers: from sheet to form (Laurence King Publishing, London 2011).

Jackson, P. Structural Packaging: Design your own boxes and 3D forms (Laurence King Publishing, London 2012).

Fiell, Charlotte & Peter, Chairs (Taschen, Italy, 2001).

Dreyfuss, H. The Measure of Man: Human factors in design (Whitney Library of Design, New York, 1967).

Pheasant, S. T. Ergonomics: Standards and Guidelines for Designers (British Standards Institution, Great Britain, 1987).

Thompson, R. Manufacturing processes for design professionals (Thames & Hudson, London 2007).

Lesko, Jim, Industrial Design-Materials and Manufacturing Guide (John Wiley & Sons, Canada, 1999).

Boundy, A. W. Engineering drawing (McGraw-Hill, Sydney 2011)