University of Technology Sydney

86007 History and Theory 2

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2022 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: Architecture
Credit points: 6 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Recommended studies:

Active participation in Orientation week activities is highly recommended, as it is when students are inducted in software management.

86006 - History and Theory 1 (or exemption)

Description

5 Keywords. History, methodology, precedent, chronology, culture

This subject is the second in the first year introduction to History and Theory and its relationship to contemporary interior architecture practice.

In articulating this relationship over the year, the two history and theory subjects (86006 and 86007) look at a wide range of relevant precedents and cultural contexts. History and Theory 2 (86007) introduces History and its application to contemporary interior architecture practice through a lecture series looking at exemplary historic buildings, including; First Nations inhabitation concepts, Haga Sophia, Alhambra, Milan Cathedral, Villa Rotunda. Cathedral of Notre-Dame, Katsura Imperial Villa, Neue Palais Potsdam, Villa Mueller, Le Corbusier, Torino Building Penrith etc. The lectures deal with the chronology of global inhabitation and its built form, while the tutorial modules focus on particular historical periods looking at both built form and cultural context.

The subject recognises that the interior exists within its cultural context and thus introduces the impact political, social and artistic movements have had on the production of interior space. During tutorial sessions, students participate in three x four-week two-hour modules to look at the details, ornaments, composition and surrounding culture and context of the interior within specific periods. All students do a module on ancient Greece and two further modules on ancient Rome, the Renaissance, the Baroque. Modernism and/or Post Modernism.

Students are expected to comprehend the form and context of given precedents and periods demonstrated through writing and drawing to set up a solid basis for further research and design work in the coming semesters and into their professional careers.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. To promote an understanding of technologies of the form and representation that are relevant to the interior.
2. To explore the historical dialectic between cultural artefact and commodity in the historical development of the interior, and its influence in today’s understanding of space.
3. To rebrand representation as a method of speculation and knowledge production device.
4. To instrumentalise history and historical analysis for the assessment of emerging conditions relevant to the interior, such as technological shifts, new subjectivities, disciplinary threats and opportunities.
5. To explore the tensions between autonomy and collaboration, the individual vs. the collective in the production of space. To explore transversal and cross-disciplinary influences in the understanding and development of the contemporary interior.
6. To produce meaningful contemporary reflections on the relation between historical and current conceptions of interior space through written documents and verbal speech.
7. To articulate sophisticated and meaningful verbal statements and written critical reflections on historical constructions of disciplinary discourse.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes:

  • Ability to develop and establish an informed and ethical understanding and/or position toward social, technical and environmental practices (A.2)
  • Ability to communicate ideas effectively, including oral, written, visual, analogue and digital presentations (2D and 3D) (C.2)
  • Ability to initiate and execute meaningful self-directed iterative processes (I.3)
  • Ability to apply and utilise appropriate communication techniques, knowledge and understanding to enable practical applications in spatial design (P.1)
  • Ability to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of interior and spatial design precedent and to contextualise one's work within the extended discipline (R.3)
  • Ability to reflect on, challenge and interrogate theoretical speculation (R.4)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

The term CAPRI is used for the five Design, Architecture and Building faculty graduate attributes. The course content, learning strategies and assessment structure is explicitly designed with these attributes in mind.

C = Communication and group work

A = Attributes and values

P = Practical and professional

R = Research and critique

I = Innovation and creativity

Teaching and learning strategies

1. Interactive lecture sessions: Students will participate in lectures where historical components will be addressed and discussed. Before each class, theoretical and archival material will be uploaded into Canvas. Students are requested to download and engage with the uploaded content before attending the lecture session. Students should take notes and prepare questions during the Lecture session and prepare for the quizzes and exam that accompanies this component.

2. Tutorials: In each tutorial session, students will receive feedback and from tutors while continuing to work iteratively towards the completion of assigned tasks. The tutorial sessions are designed strategically to respond efficiently to the specific requirements embedded within each assessment. During studio sessions, students will participate in reading groups, discussions, writing workshops, technical and aesthetic modules and feedback on their work.

Reading the weekly assigned texts before attending the lecture session is a mandatory task for every student. Students will find the weekly readings in Canvas.

3. Resources: Students have access to a collection of references and resources, some hosted by the UTS library and others made available through Canvas

An aim of this subject is to help you develop academic and professional language and communication skills in order to succeed at university and in the workplace. To determine your current academic language proficiency, you are required to complete an online language screening task, OPELA (information available at https://www.edu.au/research-and-teaching/learning-and-teaching/enhancing/language-and-learning/about-opela-students) [or a written diagnostic task]. If you receive a Basic grade for OPELA [or the written diagnostic task], you must attend additional Language Development Tutorials (each week from week [3/4] to week [11/12] in order to pass the subject. These tutorials are designed to support you to develop your language and communication skills. Students who do not complete the OPELA and/or do not attend 80% of the Language Development Tutorials will receive a Fail X grade.

Content (topics)

  • History
  • Methodology
  • Precedent
  • Chronology
  • Culture
  • Ancient Greece
  • Ancient Rome
  • The Baroque
  • The Renaissance
  • Early Modernism
  • Late Modernism
  • Post Modernism

Assessment

Assessment task 1: A History of the Interior

Intent:

Assessment one's intent is to test the retention of knowledge and concepts from the History and Theory lectures, readings, reader, videos and discussions through a sequence of quizzes, worksheets and a written exam.


The lecture schedule, readings, reader, links to video and details of the quizzes and exam will be available in the 86007_Lecture_Handout. Students will find the 86007_Lecture_Handout on Canvas before the session starts.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

2, 4, 5 and 6

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.2, C.2, I.3 and R.4

Type: Quiz/test
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 25%
Criteria:

Knowledge retention and application to specific questions relating to the history of the Interior

Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Critical Writing Skills - meaning 5 6 R.4
Knowledge retention and application 85 2 A.2
Critical Writing Skills - analysis 5 4 I.3
Critical Writing Skills - influences 5 5 C.2
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Details of the Interior A

Intent:

Detail - Ornament - Composition - Culture - Context
In three x four-week modules, you will be examining a period in history ranging from the Ancient Greek through Rome to the Renaissance, the Baroque and on to Twentieth Century modernism and postmodernism.

Over the semester, you will do one module on Ancient Greece and two modules on other historical periods.

The Themes

Detail - you will focus on the way elements are assembled and materials used across the historical periods covered in the lectures.

Ornament - you will look at ornament and decoration across different periods and cultures.

Composition - you will look at strategies of composition and colour shift across time and place.

Culture - you will look at the culture and cultural production within a given historical period, including the Visual Arts, Urban Design, The Performing Arts, Object Design, Architecture and Landscape.

Context - you will look at the intellectual, economic and socio-political context of the period.

The Modules

Individual Module leaders will emphasize different aspects of the themes mentioned above and emphasise them differently.

All Tasks are documented in the Module Handout. Students can download the Module Handout and weekly program from Canvas before starting each of their modules. (weeks 1, 5 and 9)

Module leaders will also send you this handout before the start of each of your modules. This handout will be reissued three times across the semester with the following titles;

Module Handout A (WEEK 1 - 4)

Module Handout B (WEEK 5 - 8)

Module Handout (C WEEK 9 - 12)

Important

Please make sure you have the correct handout for the weeks your module runs. (i.e. do not use Module Handout (WEEK 1 - 4) if we are in week 7)

The essay (sometimes illustrated) will be the primary communication strategy and assessable task in all modules.

The Module Handout will have the readings, resources, precedents, questions, weekly schedule and information on the assessment task etc.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 3 and 7

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

P.1, R.3 and R.4

Type: Essay
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 25%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Quality and Consistency of a portfolio of drawings and texts related to the modules 75 1 P.1
Critical Writing Skills 15 7 R.4
Critical application of visual media 10 3 R.3
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 3: Details of the Interior B & C

Intent:

Detail - Ornament - Composition - Culture - Context
In three x four-week modules, you will be examining a period in history ranging from the Ancient Greek through Rome to the Renaissance, the Baroque and on to Twentieth Century modernism and postmodernism.

Over the semester, you will do one module on Ancient Greece and two modules on other historical periods.

The Themes

Detail - you will focus on the way elements are assembled and materials used across the historical periods covered in the lectures.

Ornament - you will look at ornament and decoration across different periods and cultures.

Composition - you will look at strategies of composition and colour shift across time and place.

Culture - you will look at the culture and cultural production within a given historical period, including the Visual Arts, Urban Design, The Performing Arts, Object Design, Architecture and Landscape.

Context - you will look at the intellectual, economic and socio-political context of the period.

The Modules

Individual Module leaders will emphasize different aspects of the themes mentioned above and emphasise them differently.

All Tasks are documented in the Module Handout. Students can download the Module Handout and weekly program from Canvas before starting each of their modules. (weeks 1, 5 and 9)

Module leaders will also send you this handout before the start of each of your modules. This handout will be reissued three times across the semester with the following titles;

Module Handout A (WEEK 1 - 4)

Module Handout B (WEEK 5 - 8)

Module Handout (C WEEK 9 - 12)

Important

Please make sure you have the correct handout for the weeks your module runs. (i.e. do not use Module Handout (WEEK 1 - 4) if we are in week 7)

The essay (sometimes illustrated) will be the primary communication strategy and assessable task in all modules.

The Module Handout will have the readings, resources, precedents, questions, weekly schedule and information on the assessment task etc.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 3 and 7

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

P.1, R.3 and R.4

Type: Essay
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 50%

Minimum requirements

  1. The DAB attendance policy requires students to attend no less than 80% of formal teaching sessions (lectures and tutorials) for each class they are enrolled in to remain eligible for assessment.
  2. Pursuant to UTS rule 2.5.1 students who do not satisfy attendance requirements may be refused permission by the Responsible Academic Officer to be considered for assessment for this subject.

It is a requirement of this subject that all students complete OPELA [or a written diagnostic task]. Students who received a Basic grade in the OPELA [or the written diagnostic task] are required to attend 80% of the Language Development Tutorials in order to pass the subject. Students who do not complete the OPELA and/or do not attend 80% of the Language Development Tutorials will receive a Fail X grade.