University of Technology Sydney

86004 Design Studio: Foundations in Interior Architecture

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2022 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: Architecture
Credit points: 12 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

This subject introduces students to the foundational principles, theories and methods of interior architecture (IA). Students build on the foundational skills and knowledge that are applied throughout their degree and future professional career.

Students develop a detailed understanding of interior design and theories of space through experience with materials, model-making, ergonomics and human factors. Students are also introduced to the core IA principles of performative space and urban interior, and gain experience with design methods, presentation and critique procedures through the development of a design project.

The design studios constitute the core vehicle for student learning and development throughout the IA program. The studios combine design tutorials, lectures, workshops, presentations and critical feedback. Students in this studio develop formal and informal experimental methods, and through rigorous, iterative practices engage in the realisation and presentation of design concepts. The design process evolves through the introduction of ideas, events, programs and spatial organisation. With related readings and theory providing context, students develop and present a design response to an interior, a site and a series of contemporary issues in the built environment.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. Articulate and evaluate individual design practice
2. Explore configurations between context, objects and bodies
3. Challenge and interrogate theoretical speculation
4. Intensify theoretical speculation through texts and lectures
5. Explore and integrate performative strategies and practice into spatial design
6. Present a resolved final design project
7. Demonstrate competency in advanced and engaging communication methods

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes:

  • Ability to take autonomous responsibility for actions and decisions (A.1)
  • Ability to work cooperatively as part of a team, initiate partnerships with others, take a leadership role when required and constructively contribute to peer learning and critique (C.1)
  • Ability to communicate ideas effectively, including oral, written, visual, analogue and digital presentations (2D and 3D) (C.2)
  • Ability to apply experimentation in thinking and practice as a means toward developing an individual design approach (I.1)
  • Ability to apply and utilise appropriate communication techniques, knowledge and understanding to enable practical applications in spatial design (P.1)
  • Ability to rigorously explore, apply and extend multiple representational techniques (P.2)
  • Ability to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of interior and spatial design precedent and to contextualise one's work within the extended discipline (R.3)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

The term CAPRI is used for the five Design, Architecture and Building faculty graduate attribute categories where:

C = communication and groupwork

A = attitudes and values

P = practical and professional

R = research and critique

I = innovation and creativity.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs) are linked to these categories using codes (e.g. C-1, A-3, P-4, etc.).

Teaching and learning strategies

This subject uses various teaching and learning strategies to induct and engage students in foundational skills and knowledge of Interior Architecture. It is structured on a three-fold approach that includes: 1 hr interactive lectures, 2 hr tutorials and 4hr design studios.

Interactive Lectures: Students will engage with theories of space in Interior Architecture through an interactive lecture series. This includes reflective and responsive learning activities that may include presentations, videos, simulations, discussion of readings, and case study analysis.

Tutorials: Students will participate in developing knowledge of spatial theories through tutorials. This includes flipped classroom teaching and learning strategies, including students preparing discussion points, presentations and responses based on content that may include readings, videos, external activities and case study analysis. Formative feedback from tutors will be provided on a weekly basis, including feedback on group participation.

Design Studios: Students will develop and demonstrate their application of foundational skills and knowledge of Interior Architecture through problem-based teaching and learning strategies. This includes students developing multi-modal design responses and engaging in various active learning strategies that may include collaborative learning, individual work, case study analysis, brainstorming and simulation. Formative feedback from studio leaders will be provided on a weekly basis including feedback on group participation.

Expectations

It is imperative that students arrive prepared and on time for each campus and online engagement. For tutorials and design studios, bring all relevant work to class. Where no progress has been made, preparation has not been done or work has not been brought in, studio leaders are unable to give feedback. Model making is one of the corner stones of design practice. Students must bring their models to studio and/or present them online, for ongoing feedback.

The use of mobile phones for private use is not permitted during lecture, tutorial and studio. When learning via online video, cameras must be kept on at all times.

It is expected that students have their work prepared and ready to discuss within five minutes after the starting time of each class. Preparation is a requirement to receive critique. If you are unsure how to move forward on your projects, work up multiple options for discussion in studio.

Content (topics)

  • This subject addresses the following issues and topics:

    1.0 Iterative and generative design processes

    2.0 Material analysis and possibilities

    3.0 Scalar differentiation in relation to the body and event

    4.0 Multiple forms of spatial representation and resolution

    5.0 Project conceptualisation, resolution and presentation

    6.0 Theories of spatial design

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Wearable Analog

Intent:

Overview: Wearable Analog based on topoanalysis

Aim: To develop a detailed understanding of site, theories of space, materials, model making, ergonomics and human factors.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 3 and 6

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.1, C.2, I.1 and P.1

Type: Design/drawing/plan/sketch
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 40%
Criteria:

Deliverables:

  • Topoanalysis – bound A3 landscape document and accompanying multi-modal documentation
  • A wearable analog – size and materials to be determined on a case by case basis
  • Measured (instruction) drawings of the analog – min. 2x portrait panels A2
  • Process journal.
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Insight and accuracy of Topoanalysis 25 2 A.1
Innovation in the Wearable analog 40 3 I.1
Accuracy and detail in Measured drawings 25 6 P.1
Iterative development of ideas in Process journal 10 1 C.2
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Design Intervention

Intent:

Overview: Group design intervention based on performance intervention

Aim: To introduce students to the foundational IA principles of performative space and urban interior and to develop their experience in design methods, presentation and critique procedures through a design project.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 5, 6 and 7

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

C.1, C.2, I.1, P.1 and P.2

Type: Project
Groupwork: Group, individually assessed
Weight: 40%
Criteria:

Deliverables:

Group:

  • Performative intervention and all topoanalysis – bound A3 landscape document and accompanying multi-modal documentation of performance intervention AND topoanalysis from each team member
  • Model of the proposed design intervention – scale and materials to be specified on a case-by-case basis. To be presented on a viewing plinth custom made for this model
  • Measured presentation drawings – min. 2x A1 portrait panels

Individual:

  • The Wearable analog and final measured (instructional) documentation drawings depicting the user and instructions of how to use the analog correctly. – min. 1x A1 portrait panel
  • Finalised process journal
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Collaborative approach to Performative intervention 20 5 C.1
Innovative Model of proposed Design invention 30 7 P.1
Accurate and detailed Presentation drawings 30 6 P.2
Detailed presentation of instructional drawings for Wearable analog 10 2 C.2
Finalised development of ideas in Process journal 10 1 I.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 3: Theories of Space

Intent:

Overview: Theories of space assessment?

Aim: To develop a detailed understanding of theories of space

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1 and 4

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.1 and R.3

Type: Presentation
Groupwork: Group, individually assessed
Weight: 20%
Criteria:

Deliverables:

Group:

  • Presentation – duration and topics to be selected on a case-by-case basis

Individual:

  • Bound documentation of all exercises – min. A4 landscape document
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Comprehensive and insightful Presentation of theory 75 4 R.3
Application of key ideas from exercises 25 1 A.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Minimum requirements

Attendance

The DAB attendance policy requires students to attend no less than 80% of formal teaching sessions (lectures and tutorials) for each class they are enrolled in to remain eligible for assessment.

Pursuant to “UTS Rule 3.8.2”, students who do not satisfy attendance requirements, may be refused permission by the

Responsible Academic Officer to be considered for assessment for this subject.

Qwickly Attendance will be used to keep a record of lecture attendance. Students are required to 'check-in' online during the first 10 minutes of each lecture.

Students who are unable to attend for personal reasons (e.g. sickness) are to notify the subject's coordinators by email on the day of absence.


Late and Incomplete Assignments

Assignments submitted after the due time/date will incur the late penalties listed below unless a formal extension of time has been granted by the Subject Coordinator. This should be approved BEFORE the submission deadline where possible. Work submitted more than 5 working days after the stated submission date, will not be accepted for assessment unless a formal extension of time has been granted by the Subject Coordinator on receipt of a Special Consideration Form. (Please refer to the “Exemptions and Absence” and “Special Consideration” sections of the DAB Subject Information Book).

Work submitted up to 5 days* later than the deadline should have an “Extensions and Absence form” attached (with appropriate Doctor’s Certificate or equivalent documentation). Depending on the circumstances, the Subject

Coordinator may apply the following penalties:

Up to 1 day late: 10% late reduction **(24 hours from the specified deadline)

Up to 2 days late: 20% late reduction

Up to 3 days late: 30% late reduction

Up to 4 days late: 40% late reduction

Up to 5 days late: 50% late reduction

Over 5 days late: NOT ACCEPTED

• The 10% per day penalty is applied to the mark that would have been received if the submission had been on time.

• Any work submitted after 5 working days late would need a ‘Special Consideration’ document to be accepted for

assessment.

• Students cannot expect to receive verbal or written feedback for work submitted more than 5 days late.

* If equipment or software is not available for students to complete the late work, then the Subject Coordinator may

decide to exclude weekends from the number of days late in calculating the penalty.

** Where no exact time is specified for a deadline it will be assumed that the deadline is 9am on the date specified.

Required texts

The following texts are the required readings as part of the interactive lecture series. Studio groups will be assigned additional readings on a case-by-case basis. Required readings will be made available to students and should be read BEFORE the following weeks:

Week 2a: Woods, L. 'Analogical Architecture'.

Week 2b: O'Keefe, J. & Nadel, L. 1978, The hippocampus as a cognitive map, Clarendon Press.

Week 3: Rice, C. 2006, The Emergence of the Interior: Architecture, Modernity, Domesticity, Taylor & Francis.

Week 4: Bachelard, G. & Jolas, M. 1994, The Poetics of Space, Beacon Press.

Week 5: Bollnow, O.F. 2008, Human Space, Hyphen Press.

StuVac 1: Augé, M. 2008, Non-places, Verso.

Week 7: Coleman, N. 2014, Lefebvre for Architects, Taylor & Francis.

Week 8a: Barron, P. & Mariani, M. 2013, Terrain Vague: Interstices at the Edge of the Pale, Taylor & Francis.

Week 8b: Augé, M. 2008, Non-places, Verso.

Week 9: Heidegger, M. 2001, Poetry, Language, Thought, HarperCollins.

Week 10: Böhme, G., Borch, C., Eliasson, O. & Pallasmaa, J. 2014, Architectural Atmospheres: On the Experience and Politics of Architecture, Birkhäuser.

Recommended texts

Week 2:

Evans, R. 1997, Translation from Drawing to Building, MIT Press. pp. 156 - 186.

Week 3:

Loos, A. & Opel, A. 1998, Ornament and Crime: Selected Essays, Ariadne Press.

Ruskin, J. 1907, The Seven Lamps of Architecture, J. M. Dent & Company.

Heathcote, E. 2015, 'THE PROBLEM WITH ORNAMENT', Architectural Review, vol. 238, no. 1423, pp. 50-6.

Colquhoun, A. 2002, Modern Architecture, Oxford University Press.

Week 4:

Holm, L.E. 2013, 'Psychosis and the ineffable space of modernism', The Journal of Architecture, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 402-24.

Rice, C. 2006, The Emergence of the Interior: Architecture, Modernity, Domesticity, Taylor & Francis.

Week 5:

Lahusen, S. 1986, 'Oskar Schlemmer: Mechanical Ballets?', Dance Research: The Journal of the Society for Dance Research, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 65-77.

Sung, D.K. 2001, 'Incorporations: Exploring the Space between Body, Mechanism, and Imagination', Journal of Architectural Education (1984-), vol. 54, no. 4, pp. 260-3.

StuVac 1:

Augé, M. 2008, Non-places, Verso.

Week 7:

Lefebvre, H. 1992, The Production of Space, Wiley.

Grinceri, D. 2016, Architecture as Cultural and Political Discourse: Case Studies of Conceptual Norms and Aesthetic Practices, Taylor & Francis.

Craib, R.B. 2000, 'Cartography and Power in the Conquest and Creation of New Spain', Latin American Research Review, vol. 35, no. 1, pp. 7-36.

Week 8:

Barron, P. & Mariani, M. 2013, Terrain Vague: Interstices at the Edge of the Pale, Taylor & Francis.

Augé, M. 2008, Non-places, Verso.

Week 9:

Bourriaud, N. 2002, Relational Aesthetics, Les Presses du réel.

Watson, C. 2003, Piercing the Ground: Balgo Women's Image Making and Relationship to Country, Fremantle Arts Centre Press.

Husserl, E. 1960, Cartesian meditations: an introduction to phenomenology, M. Nijhoff.

Week 10:

Zumthor, P. 2006, Atmospheres: Architectural Environments, Surrounding Objects, Birkhäuser.