University of Technology Sydney

82120 Animation Studio: Foundations in Animation Language

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2021 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: Design
Credit points: 12 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

Research and re-imagining

Primary research through observational drawing, photography, film, and sound recording are key elements in the creative process in this subject. Students are taken through a varied program of observational drawing classes, visual research, story telling and problem-solving projects designed to introduce them to a wide range of possibilities within animation. These short projects introduce them to a diverse range of research methods, which feed directly into their creative outcomes. Students learn to record and collect information and imagery, and then to apply this to their work in imaginative ways. Secondary research, through the exploration of existing art, design, media and culture – not just animation – is also an essential component. Inspiration and information should be found in the most varied and unlikely places. Emphasis is placed on the development of a clear, original and thorough approach to research, ideas generation and character design.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. Employ a range of primary research methods through first hand experience. Including drawing, note making, photography, film and sound
2. Employ a range of secondary research methods through the use of the library, internet, social media and discussion
3. Participate in the generation of ideas and exploration around a wide range of set problems, including both narrative and non-narrative sequences
4. Actively participate in experimentation, risk taking and play within character design and animation
5. Explore and iterate in the process of creating original, authentic characters and scenarios through the analysis of motivation
6. Employ skills to learn and apply effective time management and organization for clearly defined project aims
7. Participate and engage in discussion and activities regarding the consideration of, and engagement with, the audience.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes:

  • Ability to position work within a wider social and cultural context (A.2)
  • Ability to work cooperatively as part of a team, negotiate differences and take a leadership role when required (C.1)
  • Ability to communicate ideas clearly and effectively in verbal and visual presentations (C.2)
  • Ability to develop unique aesthetic and movement languages for animation (I.2)
  • Ability to recognise the creative possibilities for animation technologies and materials, to experiment, to take risks, and contribute alternative directions (I.3)
  • Ability to understand and apply fundamental animation principles (P.1)
  • Ability to demonstrate a high level of craft and production values across all methods of animation process (P.2)
  • Ability to work with production complexity, to breakdown, organise, manage, delegate, define conventions and archive projects (P.3)
  • Ability to undertake primary and secondary research, exploring a wide range of visual and textual materials, and connect research process to final outcomes (R.1)
  • Ability to iterate, reflect, edit and engage in self-critique and critical thinking (R.3)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

The subject intends to establish a set of 'rules of engagement', or working methodologies that will become essential to the development of original animation content. Insights gained will help students to identify and build their own unique creative process. The projects are part of a broader aim to challenge existing preconceptions about what animation is and could be, and to develop an open-minded, exploratory mentality that will feed new visual languages and new forms of movement.

Teaching and learning strategies

Weekly sessions of one-hour lectures and six hours of studio-based workshops and tutorials. Students will be participating in individual tutorials, group discussions and team-based activities throughout the semester.

Activities will include demonstrations, presentations, visual tasks and exercises, seminars, case studies and external visits. The subject includes active learning experiences where ongoing feedback is provided weekly in all on-campus engagements such as lecture sessions, studios and computer labs. It is therefore imperative that students attend all on-campus engagements.

This subject uses the problem-based learning strategy that involves students in researching and developing their own solutions to complex design challenges. The subject uses design professionals as mentors and guest lecturers to ensure that all content and tasks are relevant to current professional practice in a global context. The subject combines one 1hr lecture session and two 3hr studios per week. The lecture sessions will provide knowledge relevant to the subject, enabling students to work on their design projects.

All studio briefs will be accessed through UTS Online with week by week schedules provided. Students are responsible for preparing for each studio class by following and responding to feedback given in class and by satisfying the weekly requirements of the brief. It is expected that students will spend time outside of the tutorial group on inquiry and problem based activities that relate to the assesment task. Collaboration and engagement with other students will take place within the class in the form of pin ups, group discussions and feedback and group projects.

In the studios students will work on their design projects with a mentor. At the beginning of each studio the mentor will discuss with the entire group the challenges they are facing with their projects. The mentor will then prompt students faced by similar challenges to facilitate collaborative discussions. The mentor will be reviewing the work weekly and will provide feedback verbally. It will be the students' responsibility to record any feedback provided in studio. During pin-up presentations students will be expected to actively participate in collaborative peer review feedback exercises.

Grades, marks and feedback on final design submissions will be provided through ReView.

Content (topics)

Acquisition of drawing and observation skills using different forms of mark making

The use of animation fundamentals skills studied in the 2D 'animation context' subject

Understanding of story and narrative, both linear and non linear

Understanding how to use primary and secondary research in an imaginative and authentic manner

Visual tasks and exercises using a variety of materials

Tasks to encourage strength of concept and development of ideas

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Character and Observational Drawing Design Process

Intent:

Character and Observational Drawing Design Process

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.2, C.2, I.2, P.2, R.1 and R.3

Type: Project
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 50%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Imaginative and thorough approach to the research process 10 1 R.1
Creativity and risk taking in the application of research to design solutions 10 2 A.2
Design of an original character 20 3 I.2
Ability to iterate ideas by exploring multiple options before settling on a final outcome 20 4 R.3
Appropriate use of materials for final artwork 10 5 P.2
Ability to clearly articulate concepts in studio and in presentations 10 7 C.2
Evidence of sustained effort in observing and recording directly from life 20 1 R.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Character, Environment and Story Design Process

Intent:

Character, Environment and Observational Drawing and Process

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.2, C.1, C.2, I.2, I.3, P.1, P.3, R.1 and R.3

Type: Project
Groupwork: Group, group and individually assessed
Weight: 50%
Criteria:

Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Evidence of sustained effort in observing and recording directly from life 10 1 R.1
Thoughtful and ingenious ways of connecting 'unconnected' material 10 2 A.2
Clear connection of research to final concept designs and storyboards 10 3 I.3
Ability to iterate ideas by exploring multiple options before settling on a final character and environment design 10 4 R.3
Strength of concept 10 5 I.2
Appropriate use of materials for final artwork 10 6 P.3
Ability to work well in a team and negotiate differences 10 6 C.1
Ability to clearly articulate concepts in studio and in presentations 10 7 C.2
Ability to communicate sequence and narrative in the finished storyboard 20 3 P.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Minimum requirements

The DAB attendance policy requires students to attend no less than 80% of formal teaching sessions (lectures and tutorials) for each class they are enrolled in to remain eligible for assessment.