University of Technology Sydney

68037 Physical Modelling

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Science: Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Credit points: 6 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

Anti-requisite(s): 68101 Foundations of Physics

Recommended studies: It is recommended that students enrolled in this subject have either completed 35010 Foundation Mathematics or are enrolled in or have completed 33130 Mathematical Modelling 1.

Description

This is a foundation physics subject. It covers the fundamentals of mechanics, thermal physics, electricity, fluids, waves and optics. Students are introduced to the basic techniques of measurement and technical communication.

This subject aims to develop an appreciation of the physical principles governing natural processes. It is an essential foundation experience for all engineers. Through this subject, students appreciate that physics is not just a body of knowledge to be learned and understood. Together with mathematics, it provides a framework for understanding and modelling natural phenomena that is carried over into design and analysis in engineering.

Students see that physics both enables and restrains engineering. Designs that are inconsistent with the laws of physics cannot be realised while much engineering innovation demands new physical insight or innovative uses of existing physical and mathematical models.

The subject also seeks to give students insights into the processes and pleasures of physics itself as a professional discipline. This includes basic experiences with the analytical, problem solving, observational and technical as well as measurement skills needed to model natural processes. The strong link to mathematics is integral to this aspect of the subject, as is the laboratory program which also links to mathematical modelling. The technical communication and other generic skills developed in this subject are further developed in later subjects. Graduates and later stage students, whether using physics themselves, working with physicists in a research or design team, or using new products based on advanced physics concepts, need to function in a world of innovation in which physical understanding and new physics plays a key role. This subject initiates the insights and attitudes relevant to this goal.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:

1. understand the conceptual basis in mechanics, thermal physics, oscillations, waves, electricity, fluids and optics
2. solve problems proficiently in selected areas of fundamental physics
3. apply mathematical models to describe and understand the natural world
4. measure basic physical phenomena, analyse data and verify mathematical models
5. demonstrate technical communication, project planning, team and time management skills
6. understand the nature of physics as a professional discipline of great importance to engineering innovation

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the development of following course intended learning outcomes:

  • Technically Proficient: FEIT graduates apply abstraction, mathematics and discipline fundamentals, software, tools and techniques to evaluate, implement and operate systems. (D.1)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

The Physical Modelling subject embeds the UTS Graduate Attributes by having the following elements incorporated in the subject:

‘Learning to learn’
Students are expected to demonstrate information literacy and critical thinking to use appropriate language to describe what has been learned. In 68037 these will be assessed through discussions in the laboratory sessions, laboratory reports and a final exam.

‘Professional Attributes’
The laboratory reports and the formal final exam will provide a summative evaluation of your command of the subject material. The subject teaches technical, manipulative and design skills in the form of conducting phenomena exploring laboratory experiments where communication and collaborative skills play an important part. Presentation skills are developed and assessed by compiling professional laboratory reports. Experiments are carried out in small groups where students have the opportunity to develop collaborative, group work skills which are an essential feature desired by employers.
The University has a strong, enforced policy on plagiarism and collusion relating to assessment items.
Each student has a number of tasks for this and other subjects, which must be efficiently and effectively managed throughout the semester. This also includes time management.

‘Personal Attributes’
The laboratory reports require you to seek and incorporate into submitted work up-to-date information from literature found in the library, on-line or other sources. Professional capabilities are assessed through the use of communication styles, ensuring that you will be confident in your ability to communicate.

Faculty of Science Graduate Attributes:
It is the aim of the Faculty of Science at UTS that students should have developed the following knowledge, skills, characteristics and qualities upon completion of their course:

Graduate Attribute 1 - Disciplinary knowledge and its appropriate application
An understanding of the nature, practice & application of the chosen science discipline,

Graduate Attribute 2 - An Inquiry-oriented approach
An understanding of the scientific method of knowledge acquisition. Encompasses problem solving, critical thinking and analysis attributes, and the ability to discover new understandings.

Graduate Attribute 3 - Professional skills and their appropriate application
The ability to acquire, develop, employ and integrate a range of technical, practical and professional skills, in appropriate and ethical ways within a professional context, autonomously and collaboratively and across a range of disciplinary and professional areas. Time management skills, personal organisation skills, teamwork skills, computing skills, laboratory skills, data handling, quantitative and graphical literacy skills.

Graduate Attribute 4 - Ability and motivation for continued intellectual development
The capacity to engage in reflection and learning beyond formal educational contexts, that is based on the ability to make effective judgments about one’s own work. The capacity to learn in, and from, new disciplines to enhance the application of scientific knowledge and skills in professional contexts.

Graduate Attribute 5 - Engagement with the needs of Society
An awareness of the role of science within a global culture and willingness to contribute actively to the shaping of community views on complex issues where the methods and findings of science are relevant.

Graduate Attribute 6 - Communication skills
An understanding of the different forms of communication - writing, reading, speaking, listening - including visual and graphical, within science and beyond and the ability to apply these appropriately and effectively for different audiences.

Graduate Attribute 7 - Initiative and innovative ability
An ability to think and work creatively, including the capacity for self-starting, and the ability to apply science skills to unfamiliar applications.

Faculty of Engineering and IT Graduate Attributes
It is the aim of the Faculty of Engineering and IT at UTS that students will demonstrate developed technical knowledge (Body of Knowledge) appropriate to their field of practice, and Graduate Attributes. 68037 Physical Modelling contributes to the following FEIT Graduate Attributes:

D.1 Technically Proficient: FEIT graduates apply abstraction, mathematics and discipline fundamentals, software, tools and techniques to evaluate, implement and operate systems.

Teaching and learning strategies

Weekly lectures are complemented by a substantial laboratory program.
Recognising the great variety of engineering fields into which the students will be moving, Physical Modelling is covering material relevant to all students in engineering.

Students will adopt collaborative learning strategies in an authentic laboratory environment. Learning will be facilitated through active participation in inquiry based activities in several sessions. Online resources and simulations will be used to supplement pre-prepared materials which students will read before attending a lecture or a laboratory. This peparation allows students to become familiar with the disciplinary language and basic concepts on which the lectures and laboratory sessions are based on. Tutorial sessions are designed to practise problem solving in small groups and will receive feedback from tutors. Tutorial problems are available online and students are encouraged to attempt these before the session.
All assessment items are supported by feedback to students. This feedback is given continuously throughout the semester. WileyPLUS is used and this gives students feedback on each assignment. The only item for which feedback is not given is the final exam.
The lecturing staff will be relying on the students making use of UTSOnline for
• course announcements
• course documents
• pre-lecture work
• pre-laboratory work
• gradebook listings of marks
Students who have not done any physics before, and who have limited mathematics experience may want to consider taking a Foundation Mathematics subject prior to Physical Modelling.


Communication
The official modes of communicating subject relevant information to students are UTS email and the UTSOnline announcement section. Upon enrollment, each student received a UTS email address which we shall be using to distribute subject materials and announcements. It is your responsibility to have your email forwarded to another email address in case you prefer to use a different email. Note, that email sent to your UTS email account is deemed to have been delivered to you. We take no responsibility for subsequently forwarded and lost email. Should you encounter any problems with you UTS email address, please contact the ITD Help Desk at 9514-2222.

Content (topics)


Assessment

Assessment task 1: Assignments

Intent:

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following graduate attributes:

Faculty of Science:

Graduate Attribute 1 - Disciplinary knowledge and its appropriate application
An understanding of the nature, practice & application of the chosen science discipline.
Students will have an opportunity to demonstrate their understanding of physics concepts learned in lectures and apply these concepts and associated problems solving skills.

Graduate Attribute 2 - An inquiry-oriented approach
An understanding of the scientific method of knowledge acquisition. Encompasses problem solving, critical thinking and analysis attributes, and the ability to discover new understandings.
Students will have an opportunity to demonstrate their understanding of physics concepts and problem solving skills to classical as well as challenging physics problems in an engineering context.

Faculty of Engineering and IT:

D.1 Technically Proficient: FEIT graduates apply abstraction, mathematics and discipline fundamentals, software, tools and techniques to evaluate, implement and operate systems.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

1 and 2

This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):

D.1

Type: Quiz/test
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 40%
Criteria:

Students will be assessed on:

  • accuracy and proficiency of problem solving
  • understanding of concepts.

Assessment task 2: Laboratory Work

Intent:

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following graduate attributes:

Faculty of Science:

Graduate Attribute 1 - Disciplinary knowledge and its appropriate application
An understanding of the nature, practice & application of the chosen science discipline.
Students will have an opportunity to demonstrate their understanding of physics concepts learned in lectures and apply these concepts and associated problems solving skills to conduct and analyse experiments.

Graduate Attribute 2 - An inquiry-oriented approach
An understanding of the scientific method of knowledge acquisition. Encompasses problem solving, critical thinking and analysis attributes, and the ability to discover new understandings.
inquiry based, hands-on experiments are carried out to become familiar with scientific methodolies of applying and testing concepts as well as to draw deductions and make projections based on analysed data.

Graduate Attribute 3 - Professional skills and their appropriate application
The ability to acquire, develop, employ and integrate a range of technical, practical and professional skills, in appropriate and ethical ways within a professional context, autonomously and collaboratively and across a range of disciplinary and professional areas. Time management skills, personal organisation skills, teamwork skills, computing skills, laboratory skills, data handling, quantitative and graphical literacy skills.
Students will be working in small teams to conduct inquiry based experiments. Outcomes of experiments will be recorded in individual, written laboratory reports. Students handle and analyse data using data loggers as well as spreadsheet numerical and graphical applications.

Graduate Attribute 4 - Ability and motivation for continued intellectual development
The capacity to engage in reflection and learning beyond formal educational contexts, that is based on the ability to make effective judgments about one’s own work. The capacity to learn in, and from, new disciplines to enhance the application of scientific knowledge and skills in professional contexts.
The Extended Professional Report provides students with the opportunity to take on the role of a professional engineering consultant, to relate the experimental work larger socio-economic and to make one's own judgement based on experiments conducted in a laboratory environment.

Graduate Attribute 6 - Communication skills
An understanding of the different forms of communication - writing, reading, speaking, listening - including visual and graphical, within science and beyond and the ability to apply these appropriately and effectively for different audiences.
Students present their experimental findings in structured, written laboratory reports as well as in an Professional Laboratory Report in the form of a structured, professional consultant report.

Graduate Attribute 7 - Initiative and innovative ability
An ability to think and work creatively, including the capacity for self-starting, and the ability to apply science skills to unfamiliar applications.
inquiry based experiments will give students the opportunity to plan and organise their work independently and to apply their physics skills to unfamiliar, challenging applications.

Faculty of Engineering and IT:

D.1 Technically Proficient: FEIT graduates apply abstraction, mathematics and discipline fundamentals, software, tools and techniques to evaluate, implement and operate systems.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

2, 3, 4, 5 and 6

This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):

D.1

Type: Laboratory/practical
Groupwork: Group, individually assessed
Weight: 30%
Criteria:

Accuracy and proficiency of problem solving.
Understanding of concepts physical measurement and data analysis.
Technical written communication, project planning, team management.

A detailed assessment rubric is availablle online.

Assessment task 3: Final Examination

Intent:

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following graduate attributes:

Faculty of Science:

Graduate Attribute 1 - Disciplinary knowledge and its appropriate application
An understanding of the nature, practice & application of the chosen science discipline.
Students will have an opportunity to demonstrate their understanding of physics concepts learned in lectures and apply these concepts and associated problem solving skills.

Faculty of Engineering and IT:

D.1 Technically Proficient: FEIT graduates apply abstraction, mathematics and discipline fundamentals, software, tools and techniques to evaluate, implement and operate systems.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

1, 2 and 3

This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):

D.1

Type: Examination
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 30%
Criteria:

accuracy of problem solving

understanding of concepts

Minimum requirements

There is no minimum requirement for any single assessment task. An overall accumulated minimum of 50% is required to pass this subject.

Students are expected to attend all lectures.

Practical classes in subjects offered by the School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences are an essential and integral part of each subject in which they run. In addition to assisting students' understanding of concepts, practical classes develop important laboratory skills and experience that are desired by employers. Thus students are expected to attend all scheduled practical classes.

Failure to attend a class where a report is expected to be submitted will result in a mark of zero for that report unless an acceptable reason for your absence, supported by relevant evidence, is provided to the subject coordinator.

Assignments that have been handed in and subsequently identified to be plagiarised will receive zero marks.

This subject does not offer Supplementary Assignments, Supplemenatry Pracs and Supplementary Exams for missed assignments, missed pracs or failed exams, respectively.

Repeat students who participated in the prac program recently may be eligle for an exemption from the prac program. A prac exemption form is available at UTS Online. Repeat students are required to paticipate in all other assessment tasks.

Recommended texts

The following is a list of textbooks which you might find helpful in your study:

• College Physics; Urone, Hinrichs; OpenStax.

• Fundamentals of Physics; Halliday, Resnick, Walker; Wiley.

• Physics for Scientists and Engineers; Knight, Faughn; Pearson.

• Principles of Physics; Serway, Jewett; Brooks/Cole/Cengage.

• University Physics; Young, Freedman; Pearson.

There are many more University and College Physics textbooks, which are equally suitable. UTS Library has a large collection of University and College Physics textbooks.

Other resources

There are a number of resources available to you to assist with your understanding of the material. Pre-lecture material, lecture notes, the lab manual, additional material at UTS Online are the prime sources for this subject.

This subject uses the WileyPLUS system within UTSOnline for online assignments. The WileyPLUS system includes additional learning material to assist you with problem solving and conceptual understanding of subject material. WileyPLUS is based on the textbook Fundamentals of Physics by Halliday Resnick and Walker. This textbook comes with an access kit for WileyPLUS, which allows you to access some additional material such as the online version of the textbook and animated practise material. The access kit or texbook, however, is not required to access the online assignments.

The subject is supported by the UTS U:PASS (UTS Peer Assisted Study Success) program. Students are expected to register with U:PASS at www.ssu.uts.edu.au/peerlearning/. You may attend any and as many U:PASS sessions each week, irrespective of your preferred session time indicated at sign-up.