University of Technology Sydney

60101 Chemistry and Materials Science

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2021 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Science: Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Credit points: 6 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

Anti-requisite(s): 68070 Introduction to Materials

Description

This subject develops a solid science foundation for further materials and engineering-related studies and facilitates the working relationship between engineers, materials scientists and other scientists; an ability to identify and solve chemical and materials problems; and an ability to relate properties of engineering materials to technical applications. Topics covered in this subject are: chemical bonding of materials and general chemistry, classification of materials, structure-property relationships, mechanical properties, heat treatment and strengthening mechanisms, ferrous and non-ferrous alloys, ceramics, polymers and composites, materials degradation, materials recycling and materials selection. Numerous applied examples are discussed. Laboratory work imparts practical skills and reinforces the underlying theories. This is an integral part of the subject along with tutorial workshops.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:

1. Understand and apply the basic principle of materials science and engineering, that microstructure controls properties and processing controls microstructure
2. Describe the different mechanical and physical behaviour of materials
3. Evaluate the role of standards with respect to material performance
4. Understand and use technical terms relating to materials science and engineering
5. Solve simple materials selection problems and critically assess materials selection procedures
6. Understand and apply various chemistry terms, molar calculations and chemical equations
7. Prepare a professional consultancy report evaluating mechanical properties of materials.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the development of following course intended learning outcomes:

  • Technically Proficient: FEIT graduates apply abstraction, mathematics and discipline fundamentals, software, tools and techniques to evaluate, implement and operate systems. (D.1)
  • Collaborative and Communicative: FEIT graduates work as an effective member or leader of diverse teams, communicating effectively and operating within cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural contexts in the workplace. (E.1)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

This subject contributes to the development of the following graduate attributes:

Faculty of Engineering and IT Graduate Attributes
This subject contributes to the following FEIT Graduate Attributes:

D.1 Technically Proficience

E.1 Collaborative and Communicative

Faculty of Science Graduate Attributes

The following Science graduate attributes are assessed in this subject:

1. Disciplinary knowledge
An understanding of the nature, practice & application of the chosen science area of study. This is assessed in all assessment tasks.

2. Research, Inquiry and Critical Thinking

Encompasses problem solving, critical thinking and analysis attributes, and an understanding of the scientific method knowledge acquisition. Assessment tasks 2 (labs and tutorials) and 3 (consultancy report) assess this graduate attribute.

3. Professional Ethical and Social Responsibility
The ability to acquire, develop, employ and integrate a range of technical, practical and professional skills, in appropriate and ethical ways. An awareness of the role of selecting appropriate materials to meet the needs of society is developed throughout the subject. This graduate attribute is assessed in assessment tasks 2 and 3.

5. Communication
Students will develop their written communication skills through the preparation of a consultancy report.

Teaching and learning strategies

  • Practical work is an important part of this course where you can gain manipulative skills that you will require in later stage subjects in your program. You will work inividually and in small groups to conduct experiments in the lab. The practicals will also assess your skills in the laboratory and report writing. A laboratory manual will be provided to you for early preparation for the practical work as per the program.
  • Lectures are provided with an emphasis on your participation and are supported by closely related laboratory and tutorial programs. Examples related to your degree program will be used to illustrate the importance of the topic. Selected videos will reinforce concepts introduced. Topics presented in these videos are assessable in the quiz, assessment items and final exam. Some lecture topics will be "flipped", i.e. you will need to come prepared to the lectures by reviewing pre-lecture materials and answering the short quiz which are available in UTS online.
  • Tutorials will develop problem solving skills introduced in the tutorial sessions and are based on the engineering applications of the subject manner. Tutorial manual will be provided for your early preparation as per the program.
  • On-line tutorials (via UTS Online) are available for you to test your understanding of the topics presented and receive immediate feedback on your progress.
  • UTSOnline will be used to post worked solutions to assignments, tutorials etc. and to keep you informed on your progress. Announcements will also be made via this forum.

Content (topics)

  • Overview of materials and their applications. Classification of materials.
  • Analyses and presentation of data, significant figures, errors.
  • Design and selection of materials tutorial; Brain-storm sessions, and presentations.
  • Chemistry basics, periodic table, pH, balancing chemical equations, acids/bases
  • Introduction to mechanical properties of materials. Definitions related to mechanical testing and behaviour, concepts of stress and strain, ductile and brittle behaviour, and common testing methods.
  • Crystalline and amorphous structures.
  • Structure - property relationships, introduction to crystallography - symmetry, elements, miller indices, , imperfections in crystals - point, line and surface defects.
  • Solidification - nucleation and grain growth, binary phase equilibrium diagrams - solid solutions and eutectic systems.
  • Strengthening ‘mechanisms’ - metals and their alloys, steels, brass, aluminium alloys - processing and applications.
  • Application of heat treatment methods used in steels
  • Diffusion; practical approach on welding and sintering methods. Problems related to joining methods
  • Ceramics - structures and properties, porcelains, glasses, cements; applications and processing methods.
  • Polymers - structures and properties, thermoplastics, thermosets, rubbers, timber, applications and processing methods.
  • Composites - introduction to particulate and fibre reinforced materials and their applications, rule of mixtures for predicting composite properties.
  • Materials and environment - corrosion and degradation of materials and recycling.
  • Nanomaterials

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Laboratory and Tutorials

Intent:

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Science graduate attributes:

1. disciplinary knowledge

2. research, inquiry and critical thinking

3. professional, ethical and social responsibility

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Engineering graduate attributes:

D.1 Technically Proficient

E.1 Collaborative and Communicative

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

1, 2, 3 and 5

This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):

D.1 and E.1

Type: Laboratory/practical
Groupwork: Group, individually assessed
Weight: 40%
Criteria:

Questions will be marked against the marking scheme provided with the laboratory assignment. In addition to providing correct answers and calculations, students will be assessed on:

  • correct use of data (collected from the lab sessions)
  • correct interpretation of data through calculations and graphing.

Assessment task 2: Consultancy report writing

Intent:

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Science graduate attributes:

1. disciplinary knowledge

2. research, inquiry and critical thinking

3. professional, ethical and social responsibility

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Engineering graduate attributes:

D.1 Technically Proficient

E.1 Collaborative and Communicative

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

1, 2, 3, 5 and 7

This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):

D.1 and E.1

Type: Case study
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 10%
Criteria:

Report will be marked against the criteria provided with the tutorial booklet

Assessment task 3: Final Exam

Intent:

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Science graduate attributes:

1. disciplinary knowledge

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Engineering graduate attributes:

D.1 Technically Proficient

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6

This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):

D.1

Type: Examination
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 50%
Length:

Formal exam of 2h 10 min

Criteria:

Completion of a open book examination which consists of part A and part B. Part A will contain compulsory 60 short questions and part B will contain two short essay-type questions. You need to answer only one question from part B.

Questions will be marked against the marking scheme supplied on the exam paper.

Minimum requirements

Students must obtain at least 50% of the marks available for the final examination in order to pass this subject. If they do not, they will be awarded an X (fail) grade regardless of the total marks obtained in the subject.

Students are expected to attend all lectures and practical sessions.

Recommended texts

1. The text book for the materials science sections will be Callister, Materials Science & Engineering, 1st Australian and New Zealand Edition. John Wiley and Sons.

Print ISBN : 9780730382836 | Digital ISBN : 9780730382843

2. The text book for chemistry sections will be Chemistry: Atoms First 2e , a free book by the courtesy of openstax.org.

Chemistry: Atoms First 2e is a peer-reviewed, openly licensed introductory textbook produced through a collaborative publishing partnership between OpenStax and the University of Connecticut and UConn Undergraduate Student Government Association.

Link is available in canvas under subject resources

Other resources

  • Previous editions of Callister
  • any other materials engineering textbooks