University of Technology Sydney

48320 Surveying

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2022 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Engineering: Civil and Environmental Engineering
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Undergraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

Description

This subject enables students to become competent in the theory and practice of basic surveying skills, and being able to use basic surveying equipment such as levels and theodolites. Students learn how to perform the calculations and reductions of observations associated with this equipment and to be aware of the likely errors that may occur during observations and of methods to eliminate or minimise such errors. Other surveying skills developed include making accurate distance measurements over short distances using tapes, and awareness of the advantages of modern developments in this field such as electronic distance measuring equipment. Students are aware of how to perform a simple traverse and associated calculations for the engineering applications of surveying. The stadia method is discussed in class and may be used as a data-gathering tool in a practical exercise. The applications of modern computer programs to reduce data for, and the plotting of, detail and contour plans are introduced. Services of professional surveyors are explained, as are engineering situations where surveyors must be engaged.

Professional practices of surveying and engineering are emphasised during all classes.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:

1. Identify and apply the theory and practice of basic surveying skills
2. Be aware of the use of basic surveying equipment such as levels and theodolites, and perform the calculations and reductions of observations associated with such equipment.
3. Assess the likely errors that may occur during observations, and of methods to eliminate or minimise such errors.
4. Use applications of modern computer programs to reduce data for and the plotting of detail and contour plans.
5. Recognise the role of the professional surveyor, and modern developments in surveying.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

  • Socially Responsible: FEIT graduates identify, engage, interpret and analyse stakeholder needs and cultural perspectives, establish priorities and goals, and identify constraints, uncertainties and risks (social, ethical, cultural, legislative, environmental, economics etc.) to define the system requirements. (B.1)
  • Technically Proficient: FEIT graduates apply abstraction, mathematics and discipline fundamentals, software, tools and techniques to evaluate, implement and operate systems. (D.1)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

Engineers Australia Stage 1 Competencies

This subject contributes to the development of the following Engineers Australia Stage 1 Competencies:

  • 1.1. Comprehensive, theory based understanding of the underpinning natural and physical sciences and the engineering fundamentals applicable to the engineering discipline.
  • 1.6. Understanding of the scope, principles, norms, accountabilities and bounds of sustainable engineering practice in the specific discipline.
  • 2.2. Fluent application of engineering techniques, tools and resources.

Teaching and learning strategies

Classes are given in weekly mode and include workshops by Zoom. The workshops are supported by videos, problem solving exercises and class notes. Students will also be provided the option of coming onto campus and using surveying equipment.

The subject comprises active learning modules for students whereby demonstrations in using surveying equipment, taking measurements and completing field reports will be showcased, as practical skills are an essential component of the learning and assessment of this subject. Each active learning session is also supported by information on Canvas including videos, which will need to be consulted/previewed prior to attending class, and where necessary, pre-class quizzes need to be completed. The completion of these quizzes allows for feedback to be provided to students.

As an indication, a typical 6cp subject would normally assume a total time commitment (including class time) of approximately 150 hours, for an average student aiming to pass the subject.

Content (topics)

Topics covered include:

  • Levelling: field methods, booking and reduction by Rise and Fall method and the Height of Plane of Collimation method
  • Bearings and Angles, including the use of the theodolite
  • Distance Measurement and Traversing
  • Preparation of a detail and contour plan
  • Design and set out of Horizontal and Vertical curves, Areas and volume estimation
  • Modern Developments in Surveying Equipment and Techniques

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Practical Exercise Sets

Intent:

In this assessment task, students develop and apply field measurements and techniques that are used in surveying practice.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1, 2, 3 and 4

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

D.1

Type: Exercises
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 30%
Length:

Levelling Exercise – 1 page

Traversing Exercise – 2 pages

Vertical Curve Exercise – 1 page

Contouring Exercise –1 page

Assessment task 2: Online Quiz

Intent:

In this assessment task, students evaluate basic concepts and calculations used in surveying practice.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1, 2 and 3

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

D.1

Type: Quiz/test
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 30%
Length:

65 minutes

Assessment task 3: Major Project

Intent:

Students demonstrate an ability to read surveyed plans and grades of basic road design.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1, 2, 3 and 5

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

B.1 and D.1

Type: Project
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 40%
Length:

8 pages

Minimum requirements

In order to pass this subject, a student must achieve an overall mark of 50% or more.

Required texts

There is no set textbook. Class notes are available on Canvas.

References

Schofield W and Breach M. 2007, Engineering Surveying 6th Edn, Butterworth Heinemann
Uren and Price 1994, Surveying for Engineer, 3rd Edn, McMillan Publishers, London
Muskett J. 1995, Site Surveying, 2nd Edn, Blackwell Science Ltd. Oxford
Bannister, Raymond and Baker 1998, Surveying, 7th Edn, Pearson Prentice Hall
Elfick and Fryer 1994, Elementary Surveying, 9th Edn, Harper Collins, London
Kavanagh B. 2009, Surveying, Principles and Applications, 8th Edn, Pearson Prentice Hall, Columbus

Almost any surveying text will be an adequate reference for all topics except the Modern Developments topic. U.K. texts use language and procedures which are more closely related to Australian practice than American texts.

Other resources

Canvas will be used to make announcements, particularly about changes to practical sessions as these are weather dependent. Marks for continual assessment items will also be displayed for individual students to check their progress and the accurate recording of marks by the coordinator.
Lecture notes will not be placed on Canvas. You should purchase a set of notes as these cover all the lecture topics. Power Point slides shown in class will be available on Canvas for revision.

There are also videoes covering most of the lectures available on line through Canvas.

U:PASS

UTS Peer Assisted Study Success is a voluntary “study session” where you will be studying the subject with other students in a group. It is led by a student who has previously achieved a distinction or high distinction in the subject area, and who has a good WAM. Leaders will prepare activities for you to work on in groups based on the content you are learning in lectures and tutorials. It’s really relaxed, friendly, and informal. Because the leader is a student just like you, they understand what it’s like to study the subject and how to do well, and they can pass those tips along to you. Students also say it’s a great way to meet new people and a “guaranteed study hour”.

You can sign up for U:PASS sessions via U:PASS website http://tinyurl.com/upass2017 Note that sign up is not open until week 2, as it’s voluntary and only students who want to go should sign up.

If you have any questions or concerns about U:PASS, please contact Georgina at upass@uts.edu.au, or check out the website.