University of Technology Sydney

42038 Fundamentals of Database and Software Development

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2022 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Information Technology: Information, Systems and Modelling
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Postgraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

Description

Databases and software development are an integral part of the digital world we live in. Navigating opportunities in organizations which depend upon the development of digital solutions requires employees who have strong fundamental technical skills and professional capabilities which underpin specific position requirements. Fundamentals of Databases and Software Development offers such a grounding on which to build adaptive skills to a continuously evolving digital world.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:

1. Design a database as part of an information system
2. Apply software engineering principles to develop software that meets organisational needs
3. Use professional tools and methodology for systems development in collaboration with other developers
4. Reflect on skills and knowledge learned for future career development

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

  • Design Oriented: FEIT graduates apply problem solving, design thinking and decision-making methodologies in new contexts or to novel problems, to explore, test, analyse and synthesise complex ideas, theories or concepts. (C.1)
  • Technically Proficient: FEIT graduates apply theoretical, conceptual, software and physical tools and advanced discipline knowledge to research, evaluate and predict future performance of systems characterised by complexity. (D.1)
  • Collaborative and Communicative: FEIT graduates work as an effective member or leader of diverse teams, communicating effectively and operating autonomously within cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural contexts in the workplace. (E.1)
  • Reflective: FEIT graduates critically self-review their own and others' performance with a high level of responsibility to improve and practice competently for the benefit of professional practice and society. (F.1)

Teaching and learning strategies

This subject aims to provide students with solid fundamentals of databases and software design as part of an Information System. In order to achieve such a goal, students delve into a theoretical background to properly support the design of databases meeting the requirements of real-world systems and the high-level design of software.

The subject enables the understanding of key concepts by adopting professional tools and advanced design techniques looking at real Information Systems. Moreover, students prioritise the work in teams, and are encouraged to adopt Agile methodologies to organise and effectively execute activities that require collaboration. Students are expected to self-organise selected projects. However, they receive continuous feedback from the instructors who interact with students to give direction and provide insight.

All assessment tasks are developed with learning at the fore and, hence, peer and self-assessment strategies are used extensively throughout the different learning stages. While two assessment tasks are projects that aim at the understanding of key concepts, tools and techniques in the context of Information Systems, the last assignment has a reflective character. In general, students are expected to address the feedback received to achieve project aims.

Content (topics)

The subject is ideally structured in four different modules as follows:

Introduction

  • Database and Software in everyday life
  • Database and Software as part of an Information System

Module 1: Developing IS architectures

  • Agile methodology

Module 2: Database Design

  • Principles of Databases
  • Data requirements in IS
  • Database design

Module 3: Software Architecture Design

  • Principles of Software Engineering
  • Software requirements in IS
  • Describing software architecture

Module 4: Information and Software in the modern society

  • Case Studies analysis

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Project 1 Database design

Intent:

Given a system presented at the time, students elicit requirements from a data perspective and design a database accordingly.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1 and 3

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

C.1, D.1 and E.1

Type: Case study
Groupwork: Group, group and individually assessed
Weight: 40%

Assessment task 2: Project 2 Software design

Intent:

Able to specify key functionalities and the interactions of a sub-system of a relatively complex IS presented at the time.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

2 and 3

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

C.1, D.1 and E.1

Type: Case study
Groupwork: Group, group and individually assessed
Weight: 40%

Assessment task 3: Reflective Essay Information and Software in modern society

Intent:

Personal reflection on the skills provided by the subject for career development.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

4

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

F.1

Type: Reflection
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 20%

Minimum requirements

To pass this subject, students must achieve an overall mark of 50% or greater.

Required texts

Instructors provide ad hoc material to support the learning process at each stage. It includes lecture slides, examples and guidelines. External references, as well as material for deeper learning, are provided where possible.

References

A.Silberschatz, H.F.Korth, S.Sudarshan, Database System Concepts, 7th Edition, McGraw-Hill Education.

R.S.Pressman, B.R.Maxim, Software Engineering - A Practitioner's Approach, 9th Edition, McGraw-Hill Education.

P.Baltzan, M: Information Systems, 5th Edition, McGraw-Hill Education.