University of Technology Sydney

32516 Internet Programming

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2022 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Information Technology: Computer Science
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Postgraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Recommended studies: basic knowledge of programming languages and Unix systems

Description

This subject introduces students to the specifics of the World Wide Web (WWW) and internet-based programming. The evolution of the internet and its technical foundation is studied as well as basic techniques for presenting data, text and pictures on the WWW. The client/server paradigm is explored in detail, featuring website design and construction using DHTML (Dynamic Hypertext Markup Language), PHP (Hypertext Pre-processor), MySQL (back-end database), AJAX and JavaScript techniques. This subject provides a sound basis for understanding how the WWW functions, how to construct websites and how to write software for the WWW using scripting techniques.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:

1. Understand the general concepts pertaining to the Internet and World Wide Web such as TCP/IP, protocols, domain names, IP addresses and n-tier architecture. (general level of understanding)
2. Possess an insight into what is involved in the developing and securing of non-trivial websites. (general level)
3. Have a good working knowledge of DHTML, JavaScript, AJAX, and the principles of website design. (expert’s level)
4. Have an insight into how javascript libraries such as JQuery can be used to enhance web pages. (general level)
5. Have an introductory knowledge how XML documents can be used on the Web. (general level)
6. Gain experience in the use of PHP as a server side scripting language as well as the principles involved in using server side scripting languages in general.(expert’s level)
7. Gain a sufficient knowledge of Unix so they can effectively manage websites hosted on sites running on any variety of the Unix Operating System. (general level)

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

  • Socially Responsible: FEIT graduates identify, engage, and influence stakeholders, and apply expert judgment establishing and managing constraints, conflicts and uncertainties within a hazards and risk framework to define system requirements and interactivity. (B.1)
  • Design Oriented: FEIT graduates apply problem solving, design thinking and decision-making methodologies in new contexts or to novel problems, to explore, test, analyse and synthesise complex ideas, theories or concepts. (C.1)
  • Technically Proficient: FEIT graduates apply theoretical, conceptual, software and physical tools and advanced discipline knowledge to research, evaluate and predict future performance of systems characterised by complexity. (D.1)
  • Collaborative and Communicative: FEIT graduates work as an effective member or leader of diverse teams, communicating effectively and operating autonomously within cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural contexts in the workplace. (E.1)

Teaching and learning strategies

Subject presentation includes lectures (1 hour), laboratory sessions (2 hours), and research and development work for the assignments. Lectures will present the theoretical aspects of Internet programming and web development, including client-side and server side scripting for webpage development. The laboratory sessions are conducted in the lab and require substantial preparation from the students. They will focus on hands-on experience in Internet programming and web development. Practical assignments can be performed anywhere, the labs will provide the softwares necessary to complete these assignments.

Content (topics)

  1. The Internet and World Wide Web – General Principles
  2. Dynamic Hypertext Markup Language (DHTML) (includes coverage of CSS)
  3. JavaScript, JavaScript Libraries and AJAX
  4. PHP Programming,(includes using PHP to interact with MySQL databases)
  5. Website Management and Security
  6. XML and XHTML

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Website Design Assignment

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1, 2, 3, 6 and 7

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

C.1, D.1 and E.1

Type: Project
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 45%

Assessment task 2: XML/AJAX Processing Assignment

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

B.1 and C.1

Type: Project
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 35%

Assessment task 3: Quizzes

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

B.1 and C.1

Type: Quiz/test
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 20%

Minimum requirements

In order to pass the subject, a student must achieve an overall mark of 50% or more.

Recommended texts

There are two textbooks that cover the most of the units to be taught in the course. They are:

Welling, Thomson: PHP and MySQL Web Development, Sams Publishing 2005, ISBN 0-672-32672-8

Meloni, Julie C. PHP, MySQL and Apache All in One, 3rd Edition (or later) Sams Publishing, 2006. ISBN 978067232873

In addition to the two textbooks above, the following books may be helpful on specific topics but are not compulsory reading for this subject.

Deitel H. M., Deitel P. J. & Nieto T. R. (2002) Internet & World Wide Web - How to Program, 2nd Edition (or later) Prentice Hall 2002 ISBN 0-13-030897-8

Oliver, Dick. Teach Yourself HTML and XHTML in 24 Hours, 5th Edition (or later) Sams Publishing 2001 ISBN 0672-32076-2

Moncur, Michael Teach Yourself DHTML in 24 Hours, latest edition Sams Publishing

Zandstra, Matt. Teach Yourself PHP in 24 Hours, 3rd Edition (or later) Sams Publishing, 2004. ISBN 0672-3261

Goodman, Danny The Javascript Bible (3rd edition or later) IDG Books

Online material will be available to support aspects of the subject.

References

In addition to the two textbooks above, the following books may be helpful on specific topics but are not compulsory reading for this subject.

Niederst, Jennifer Web Design in a Nutshell (3rd edition) O’Reilly 978-0596009878

Sierra, Kathy : Head First Java (2nd Edition) O'Reilly 978-0596009205

Meloni, Julie : Sams Teach Yourself HTML and CSS in 24 Hours (8th Edition) 978-0672330971

Online material will be available to support aspects of the subject.

Other resources

The Canvas website provides online support for teaching and learning of this subject. The support includes online curriculum, online tutorial, online notice/news, online assignment submission and online mark checking.