University of Technology Sydney

15316 Project Scope, Time and Cost Management

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2021 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: School of the Built Environment
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Postgraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

This subject aims to explore key concepts and develop relevant techniques necessary to understand and practice project management from an integrated perspective of scope, time and cost management. In the scope management component, topics including scope definition, control and validation are being introduced. For the time management component, this subject includes the definition of project activities, estimating the duration and resources of activities, developing, controlling and optimising a project schedule, as well as the planning of project resources. In the cost management component, topics include feasibility analysis, cost estimation, and the management and control of the project budget. Students work independently and in small groups on a range of assessment tasks.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. Effectively communicate project cost and time management outputs in writing
2. Demonstrate understanding of principles of scope, time and cost management that are required for professional practices in project management
3. Effectively apply and methods and tools to analyse project performance data
4. Demonstrate ability to think critically and synthesis complex project data

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes:

  • Ability to effectively use written communication in projects at a professional level (Written Communication) (C.2)
  • Ability to apply foundational project management knowledge in projects (Foundational Knowledge) (P.1)
  • Ability to apply methods and tools to analyse data and information for managing projects (Information Analysis) (P.4)
  • Ability to think critically and synthesise complex data (Critical Engagement) (R.1)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

The term CAPRI is used for the five Design, Architecture and Building faculty graduate attribute categories where:

C = communication and groupwork

A = attitudes and values

P = practical and professional

R = research and critique

I = innovation and creativity.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs) are linked to these categories using codes (e.g. C-1, A-3, P-4, etc.).

Teaching and learning strategies

This subject is offered face-to-face in an intensive block workshop and incorporates a range of teaching and learning strategies:

Strategy 1- Student’s Preparation for Learning: Online references and resource materials are provided prior to the block workshop to familiarise students with the subject contents. Learning from pre-workshop readings and its applications will be assessed by an online quiz, which is to be viewed prior to the block workshop. Students will be engaged through the use of pre-workshop readings and online quiz (UTS Online) and engender problem-based learning.

Strategy 2- Lectures: Lecturers and guest lecturers from practice engage students in principal concepts and fundamental tools and techniques in project time and cost management. Students are encouraged to ask questions during lectures. Several real and hypothetical examples are used to contextualise learning and practice applications of the tools. Lectures are a key learning resource in this subject and the presentation slides are available for student review via UTS Online prior to the workshop.

Strategy 3- Collaborative Problem Solving: During lectures, students will work together and learn collaboratively in small groups solving problems that are directly related to the subject content covered during the lectures. This approach will assist students in applying and demonstrating their learning through cases involving hypothetical and actual scenarios.

Strategy 4- Online learning: UTS Online is where students access material for self-directed learning and engage in student-led discussion on key topics. Presentation slides are available for review on UTS Online. Students can share their questions and ideas on the open discussion forum (UTS Online), with prompt guidance and feedback from the subject coordinator.

Strategy 5- Ongoing Feedback: Structured feedback is provided individually, to each tutorial and to the subject group about daily group activities, pre-workshop quiz and a final exam. There will be opportunities to receive immediate feedback during the workshop. Detailed guidance as to the assessment criteria and the provision of timely feedback will form an important part of the learning process.

Content (topics)

The following topic areas are covered:

1. Scope management: Project scope definition, control and validation.

2. Time management: Activity definition, activity duration estimating, activity sequencing, schedule development and control. These topics will be integrated into an examination of scheduling techniques, critical path analysis, extended network calculations, resource planning and schedule optimising.

3. Cost management: Feasibility studies, cost estimating, cost budgeting, cash flow planning and cost control. This will include supporting financial concepts used in project feasibility assessment.

4. Specific techniques for project performance monitoring, controlling and communicating in relation to time and cost management.

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Pre-workshop assignment

Intent:

This online quiz comprising of multiple choice, short answer, and extended response questions is based on specified readings and data provided. This task will give students an opportunity to evaluate their self-directed learning from pre-workshop readings material.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

2

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

P.1

Type: Quiz/test
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 20%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Understanding of project definition principles and specific feasibility analysis methods provided in pre-workshop readings 100 2 P.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Group Exercises on subject topics

Intent:

This task will give students an opportunity to practice the subject topics in a variety of hypothetical project scenarios to demonstrate and develop their competencies in understanding and using project scope, time and cost management methods that are expected in professional practice.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 3 and 4

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

C.2, P.1, P.4 and R.1

Type: Exercises
Groupwork: Group, individually assessed
Weight: 40%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Quality and accuracy of each activity of the assessment that shows the understanding of specific principles and techniques covered in the workshop 40 2 P.1
Quality of writing that shows the ability to effectively communicate in writing in the context of project management 20 1 C.2
Ability to think critically and synthesise complex data 20 4 R.1
Ablity to analyse project performance data 20 3 P.4
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 3: Final examination

Intent:

To assess the knowledge gained in the subject through the semester.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

2, 3 and 4

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

P.1, P.4 and R.1

Type: Examination
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 40%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Demonstrate knowledge and capability of applying time and cost management tools and principles 40 2 P.1
Demonstrate knowledge and capability of thinking critically and synthesise complex data 30 4 R.1
Demonstrate capability for analysing project performance data 30 3 P.4
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Minimum requirements

The DAB attendance policy requires students to attend no less than 80% of formal teaching sessions (lectures and tutorials) for each class they are enrolled in to remain eligible for assessment.

Project Management students are required to attend 80% of all classes for all enrolled subjects. Achievement of the subject’s aims is difficult if classes are not attended. Where assessment tasks are to be presented personally in class, attendance is mandatory. Pursuant to UTS rule 3.8.2 students who do not satisfy attendance requirements may be refused permission by the Responsible Academic Officer to be considered for assessment for this subject.

Required texts

Larson, E. W., Honig, B., Gray, C. F., Dantin, U., & Baccarini, D. (2014). Project management: The managerial process. McGraw Hill Australia.

Project Management Institute. (2013). A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (5th ed.).

Chapter 6: Project selection (pp. 64-82) in Burke, R. (2013) Project Management: Planning and control techniques (5th ed.).Wiley.

Recommended texts

Vanhoucke, M. (2009). Measuring time: Improving project performance using earned value management (Vol. 136). Springer Science & Business Media.

Project Management Institute. (2011). Practice standard for scheduling (2nd ed.).

Chapter 4: Planning projects, part 1 (pp. 105-160) in Schwalbe, K. (2009). An introduction to project management (2nd ed.). Course Technology Cengage Learning.

References

Australian Institute of Project Management. (1996). National competency standards for project management.

Billingham, V. (2008). Project management: How to plan and deliver a successful project. Studymates.

Budd, C. I., & Budd, C. S. (2005). A practical guide to earned value project management. Management Concepts.

Dayal, S. (2008). Earned value project management using Microsoft Office Project: A guide of managing any size project effectively. J. Ross Publishers.

Fleming, Q. W., & Koppelman, J. M. (2006). Earned value project management (3rd ed.). Project Management Institute.

Hartley, S. (2003). Project management – a competency based approach. Prentice Hall.

Hillson, D. (2009). Managing risks in projects. Gower.

Kerzner, H. (2009). Project management: A systems approach to planning, scheduling and controlling. Wiley.

Kuehn, U. (2006). Integrated cost and schedule control in project management. Management Concept.

Lewis, J. P. (2006). Fundamentals of project management. Amacom.