University of Technology Sydney

090015 Global Health Systems

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2021 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Health
Credit points: 3 cp

Subject level:

Postgraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

This subject provides a critical understanding of the effect of economic, political, social and environmental factors and structures on the organisation and performance of health systems. Students develop an appreciation of health systems in different societies and the roles of different organisations and institutions that affect global health policy. Case studies from high-, low- and middle-income countries are used to illustrate the challenges health systems face on national, regional and global scales. Students identify and critically examine the role of public health in global health systems, and how public health research and practice can be used to inform and engage with a variety of stakeholders to strengthen health systems.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:
A. Examine political, economic, social and environmental forces and dynamics that affect health systems.
B. Evaluate the critical position of public health professionals and key concepts in global health systems.
C. Appraise the role of and relationships between supranational institutions, organisations, and aid programs in addressing public health priorities.
D. Apply systems thinking to the analysis of health systems across global, national and regional settings.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the following graduate attributes:

  • Contribute to complex policy-related dialogue and evaluation of public health strategies in the community (2.3)
  • Advocate for, create and respect the engagement of partnerships on matters critical to public health (4.2)

Teaching and learning strategies

This subject is delivered through weekly active online learning distributed over a period of six weeks. There is an expectation that students complete all online activities to get the most out of the subject. Students will be provided with engaging learning activities to deepen their understanding of concepts and theories relevant to Global Health Systems. Online activities will provide students with the opportunity to collaboratively discuss, analyse, and develop ideas, to address real-world scenarios and contemporary threats to global health systems.

Weekly online tutorials give students the opportunity to collaboratively discuss, analyse, and develop ideas gained from the online activities, to address real-world scenarios and contemporary threats to global health systems. Assessments are designed to complement the learning by providing students with the opportunity to practically apply and track their understanding of concepts relevant to global public health. Students will receive feedback from teaching staff and peers in online discussions and activities.

Content (topics)

  • Definitions, history, and key concepts of global public health
  • The impact of globalisation on health
  • International health (care) systems and evaluation
  • Global public health policy and politics with a focus on global agencies and international development goals

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Online Activities

Intent:

To assess students’ ability to apply key concepts of global public health.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A, B, C and D

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

.0 and .0

Weight: 40%
Length:

You will have 15 minutes to complete multiple-choice activities (questions not answered at time-out will not attract points). Essay type activities and marked online-discussions are approx. 250 words.

Assessment task 2: Government Brief

Intent:

This assessment enables students to develop skills in analysing global public health issues in a national context and in developing evidence-based strategies addressing these with appropriate stakeholders.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A, B, C and D

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

.0, .0, 2.3 and 4.2

Weight: 60%
Length:

1,500 words maximum (exlcuding reference list)

Recommended texts

Benatar, S., & Brock, G. (2011). Global health and global health ethics. Cambridge University Press.

Skolnik, R. (2020). Global health 101 (4th edition). Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Warwick-Booth, L., & Cross, R. (2018). Global health studies?: a social determinants perspective. Polity.

Other resources

UTS Student Centre
Building 10

Monday to Friday: 9am - 5pm
Tel: 1300 ASK UTS (1300 275 887)

Details for student centres: www.uts.edu.au/current-students/contacts/general-contacts

For other resources/ information refer to the Faculty of Health website (www.uts.edu.au/about/faculty-health) and UTSOnline at: https://online.uts.edu.au/webapps/login/

UTS Library
The Library has a wide range of resources, facilities and services to support you including textbooks, subject readings, health literature databases, workshops and bookable study rooms. There is also a team of librarians to help you with your questions available via online chat, phone and in person. W: lib.uts.edu.au, Facebook: utslibrary, Twitter: @utslibrary Tel: (02) 9514 3666.

Improve your academic and English language skills
Marks for all assessment tasks such as assignments and examinations are given not only for what you write but also for how you write. If you would like the opportunity to improve your academic and English language skills, make an appointment with the HELPS (Higher Education Language & Presentation Support) Service in Student Services.

HELPS (Higher Education Language & Presentation Support)
HELPS provides assistance with English language proficiency and academic language. Students who need to develop their written and/or spoken English should make use of the free services offered by HELPS, including academic language workshops, vacation intensive courses, drop-in consultations, individual appointments and Conversations@UTS (www.ssu.uts.edu.au/helps). HELPS staff are also available for drop-in consultations at the UTS Library. Phone (02) 9514 9733.

Please see www.uts.edu.au for additional information on other resources provided to students by UTS.