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92571 Principles of Primary Health Care

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2019 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Health
Credit points: 6 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

This subject introduces students to the principles and philosophy of primary health care. Students examine models of care that are used to prevent and manage illness in Australia and around the world and develop an understanding of the funding of primary health care and the workforce that provides the services. Students explore ways in which primary health care can reduce health inequities in the context of the social determinants of health. Students identify the strengths of primary health care and potential implications for service planning and delivery.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:
A. Describe the principles of primary health care.
B. Identify models of primary health care that can reduce health inequity in Australia.
C. Evaluate primary health care models for vulnerable population groups in Australia and around the world.
D. Evaluate the suitability of primary health care services in intervening in the social determinants of health.
E. Determine the components of multidisciplinary primary health care.
F. Identify the funding sources for primary health care in Australia.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the following graduate attributes:

  • Demonstrate creative and adaptive thinking within a changeable social, political and technological environment (2.0)
  • Are ethical and responsible professionals who value the diversity of people and communities (4.0)
  • Translate research and evaluation into social and professional practice through critical thinking and knowledge integration (5.0)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

Graduates from this course will have developed foundation level knowledge of primary health care and be able to understand the contribution of a strong primary health care system in reducing health inequalities. Graduates will develop understandings of the role of health care professionals, policy makers and government in the delivery of best practice primary health care.

Teaching and learning strategies

A mix of face-to-face and online learning supports collaborative learning and development of primary health care concepts and knowledge. Critical thinking approaches are drawn on as students develop evidence based problem-solving skills.

Weekly sessions include:

  1. Allocated preparation (that includes reading, listening to podcasts or watching online material) that is expanded upon in weekly in-class learning including lectures and small group collaborative activities.
  2. In-class sessions. These include varied delivery formats to introduce concepts, support learning and apply/review content. Mini-lectures introduce topics, which are then expanded through discussion and small group collaborative exercises. UTSOnline provides a venue to discuss course content and assignments at any time.

Content (topics)

  • Principles of primary health care for example: access, equity, community engagement, multisectorial collaboration, appropriate use of technology
  • Intervening in the social determinants of health
  • Primary health care services in Australia: models and funding
  • Primary health care services across the world: models and funding
  • Primary health care workforce
  • Health literacy in primary health care
  • Designing and implementing primary health care services in vulnerable populations

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Primary health care service identification

Intent:

Students develop skills in identifying the characteristics of primary health care services. This assesment task provides early feedback to students that will help them complete assessments 2 and 3.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A, B, D and F

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

2.0 and 5.0

Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 25%
Length:

1000 words

Assessment task 2: Critique a primary health care service for a vulnerable population

Intent:

Students critically reflect on the barriers to accessing primary health care for a specific vulnerable group (e.g. people with disabilities, gender diverse, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people) and ways in which primary health care can be delivered to engage community.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

B, C and E

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

4.0 and 5.0

Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 50%
Length:

1200 words

Assessment task 3: Developing a primary health care service for a vulnerable population group

Intent:

Students work collaboratively to “pitch” a new primary health care service to an (imaginary) state government minister. Feedback on this assessment task will be given in class.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A, B, C, D, E and F

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

2.0 and 5.0

Groupwork: Group, group assessed
Weight: 25%
Length:

Poster and short presentation to be presented in the final class of the semester

Other resources

UTS Student Centre
Building 10
Monday to Friday: 9am - 5pm
Tel: 1300 ASK UTS (1300 275 887)

Details for student centres: www.uts.edu.au/current-students/contacts/general-contacts
For other resources/information refer to the Faculty of Health website (www.uts.edu.au/about/faculty-health), the Health Student Guide (www.uts.edu.au/sites/default/files/uts-health-student-guide.pdf) and UTSOnline at: https://online.uts.edu.au/webapps/login/

UTS Library
The Library has a wide range of resources, facilities and services to support you including textbooks, subject readings, old exam papers, academic writing guides, health literature databases, workshops, a gaming room and bookable group study rooms. There is also a team of librarians to help you with all your questions.
W: lib.uts.edu.au, Facebook: utslibrary, Twitter: @utslibrary Tel: (02) 9514 3666

Improve your academic and English language skills

Marks for all assessment tasks such as assignments and examinations are given not only for what you write but also for how you write. If you would like the opportunity to improve your academic and English language skills, make an appointment with the HELPS (Higher Education Language & Presentation Support) Service in Student Services.

HELPS (Higher Education Language & Presentation Support)
HELPS provides assistance with English language proficiency and academic language. Students who need to develop their written and/or spoken English should make use of the free services offered by HELPS, including academic language workshops, vacation intensive courses, drop-in consultations, individual appointments and Conversations@UTS (www.ssu.uts.edu.au/helps). HELPS staff are also available for drop-in consultations at the UTS Library. Phone (02) 9514 9733

Please see www.uts.edu.au for additional information on other resources provided to students by UTS.