University of Technology, Sydney

Staff directory | Webmail | Maps | Newsroom | What's on

92376 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health: Women and Babies

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Health
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Postgraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

This subject enhances students' understanding and awareness of the issues related to the health of Indigenous people, particularly Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Students are given the opportunity to explore their own personal and professional beliefs and attitudes in relation to working alongside Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and babies. Students examine the ways that colonialism has impacted, and continues to impact, the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through cultural, political and socioeconomic circumstances. Content includes a focus on health conditions and outcomes that more commonly occur in the population of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and babies, and includes examining causal pathways and programs developed to support optimal health. It also examines primary health care initiatives and community development approaches that have been implemented to address the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and babies in Australia as well as Indigenous people in other countries.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:
A. Discuss the history of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and critically evaluate the impact this history has on health and wellbeing
B. Describe links between colonisation and health and how these have impacted on Indigenous maternal and infant health outcomes in Australia
C. Recognise the specific needs of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and their communities and recommend appropriate measures that seek to address health disparity between Indigenous and non-Indigenous women, babies and communities
D. Explore their own personal and professional beliefs and attitudes in relation to working alongside Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, babies and families
E. Critically analyse maternity service provision in relation to providing a culturally respectful and competent services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
F. Incorporate pathophysiology, symptomatology and inter-professional management of high prevalence chronic diseases that impact on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and babies

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the following graduate attributes:

  • Practise woman-centred care (1.0)
  • Demonstrate woman-centred care, acknowledging the physiological, psychological, cultural and spiritual needs of women, their babies and family members (1.1)
  • Demonstrate critical thinking and sound clinical judgment that is based on evidence and reflects appropriate reasoning within the relevant professional codes and guidelines (2.2)
  • Are resilient, emotionally competent midwives who foster human flourishing (4.0)
  • Are socially responsible citizens who value the diversity of people (5.0)
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the broader health system and advocate for midwifery as a local and global public health strategy (5.2)
  • Practise with the knowledge that midwifery can make the biggest difference to the least advantaged women and families (5.3)

Teaching and learning strategies

In this subject, students participate in a range of teaching and learning strategies that are designed to assist them to develop understanding and awareness of the issues related to the health and wellbeing of Indigenous mothers, babies and families. Students explore personal and professional beliefs to assist in developing cultural competence and respect.

ONLINE LEARNING ACTIVITIES
Students access online learning resources including podcasts, videos, professional and grey literature prior to attending face-to-face sessions. Attendance patterns for this subject require students to rely on online modes to deliver content and support learning. Students then review online activities and discuss them in class to share learning, experiences and reflections.

STORIES AND SCENARIOS
This subject uses stories and scenarios to help students explore health and wellbeing related scenarios. Cases depict women, babies and their families in a maternal and child health setting. Students use these scenarios to learn concepts, interpret information and develop creative solutions through a strengths-based approach. The subject develops critical thinking through analysis, interpretation of and reflection on issues or situations. Students also have the opportunity, through a collaborative art workshop, to share and paint their own journey towards developing cultural respect and competence in midwifery practice.

LECTURES
Face-to-face lectures enable students to clarify, discuss and develop subject concepts.

COLLABORATIVE LEARNING ACTIVITIES
The majority of the face-to-face time in this subject involves collaborative group activities and workshops. Staff support students to engage in content prior to attending class and class time focuses on group learning and mentored activities to support learning. Students are also supported to meaningfully engage in online collaborative activities through the use of a private social media page. Students are encouraged to share positive media stories in relation to the health and wellbeing of Indigenous mothers, babies and families.

PERSONAL, PROFESSIONAL AND EXPERT NARRATIVES
Guest speakers provide students with personal and professional stories in relation to the subject content. Hearing stories from both a professional and personal perspective supports students to relate learning to real world situations.

Content (topics)

Understanding and exploring Aboriginal identity and diversity

  • Personal, professional and health system cultural competency
  • Historical influences on the health and wellbeing of Indigenous peoples
  • Colonisation and racism as determinants of Indigenous health
  • Understanding Aboriginal culture and Acknowledgement of Country in everyday life
  • Respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture, traditions and the contribution of elders - past, present and future

Understanding the health outcome issues for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

  • Health outcomes of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and babies
  • High-prevalence chronic and pregnancy-related conditions that impact on Indigenous maternal and infant outcomes

Working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

  • Strengths-based approaches to care provision and support for Indigenous women, babies, families and communities
  • The importance of building effective relationships and providing midwifery continuity of care
  • Exploration of specific and mainstream services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and babies
  • Community-controlled health organisations and other agencies who provide services

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Brief reflection on your own experience of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture

Intent:

This assessment enables an individual reflection on students' own knowledge and experience of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture.

Type: Reflection
Weight: 10%
Length:

200-300 words

Assessment task 2: Audit of a health service

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

B, C, D and F

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

2.2, 4.0, 5.2 and 5.3

Type: Report
Weight: 40%
Length:

1500 words

Criteria:

Comprehensive marking criteria for this assessment is available under 'Assessments' in UTSOnline.

Assessment task 3: Powerpoint presentation: Improving the health and well-being of Indigenous Australians

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

C and F

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

1.0 and 1.1

Type: Presentation
Groupwork: Group, group assessed
Weight: 30%
Length:

A maximum of 10 slides (including the heading and reference list slides) is required. There should be <100 words in the 'notes' section accompanying each slide.

Criteria:

Comprehensive marking criteria for this assessment is available under 'Assessments' in UTSOnline.

Assessment task 4: Reflection

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

D

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

4.0 and 5.0

Type: Reflection
Weight: 20%
Length:

800 words

References

Australian Government 2013, National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023, Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra.

Australian Indigenous Health Infonet 2016, What is the history of Closing the Gap?, Edith Cowan University, Western Australia, viewed 10 January 2018, <http://www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au/closing-the-gap/key-facts/what-is-the-history-of-closing-the-gap>.

Best, O. & Fredericks, B. (eds) 2018, Yatdjuligin: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nursing & midwifery care, 2nd Edn, Cambridge University Press, Melbourne.

Carson, B., Dunbar, T., Chenhall, R. & Bailie, R. (eds) 2007, Social determinants of Indigenous health, Allen & Unwin, North Sydney.

Dudgeon, P., Milroy, H. & Walker, R. (eds) 2014, Working together: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health and wellbeing principles and practice, 2nd edn, Commonwealth of Australia, Canberra.

MacRae, A., Thomson, M., Anomie, Burns, J., Catto, M., Gray, C., Levitan, L., McLoughlin, N., Potter, C., Ride, K., Stumpers, S., Trzesinski, A. & Urquhart, B. 2013, Overview of Australian Indigenous health status, Australian Indigenous Health InfoNet, Western Australia. Viewed 10 January 2019 from <http://www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au/health-facts/overviews>

Pairman, S., Pincombe, J., Thorogood, C. & Tracy, S. (eds) 2015, Midwifery: Preparation for practice, 3rd edn, Elsevier, Sydney.

Secretariat of National Aboriginal and Islander Child Care 2011, Growing up our way: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child rearing practices matrix, Secretariat of National Aboriginal and Islander Child Care, Melbourne.

Sherwood, J. 2013, 'Colonisation - It's bad for your health: The context of Aboriginal health', Contemporary Nurse: A Journal for the Australian Nursing Profession, vol. 46, no. 1, pp. 28-40.

Other resources

UTS Student Centre
Building 10
Monday to Friday: 9am - 5pm
Tel: 1300 ASK UTS (1300 275 887)

Details for student centres: www.uts.edu.au/current-students/contacts/general-contacts
For other resources/information refer to the Faculty of Health website (www.uts.edu.au/about/faculty-health), the Health Student Guide (www.uts.edu.au/sites/default/files/uts-health-student-guide.pdf) and UTSOnline at: https://online.uts.edu.au/webapps/login/

UTS Library
The Library has a wide range of resources, facilities and services to support you including textbooks, subject readings, old exam papers, academic writing guides, health literature databases, workshops, a gaming room and bookable group study rooms. There is also a team of librarians to help you with all your questions.
W: lib.uts.edu.au, Facebook: utslibrary, Twitter: @utslibrary Tel: (02) 9514 3666

Improve your academic and English language skills
Marks for all assessment tasks such as assignments and examinations are given not only for what you write but also for how you write. If you would like the opportunity to improve your academic and English language skills, make an appointment with the HELPS (Higher Education Language & Presentation Support) Service in Student Services.

HELPS (Higher Education Language & Presentation Support)
HELPS provides assistance with English language proficiency and academic language. Students who need to develop their written and/or spoken English should make use of the free services offered by HELPS, including academic language workshops, vacation intensive courses, drop-in consultations, individual appointments and Conversations@UTS (www.ssu.uts.edu.au/helps). HELPS staff are also available for drop-in consultations at the UTS Library. Phone (02) 9514 9733

Please see www.uts.edu.au for additional information on other resources provided to students by UTS.