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83921 Research: Fashion and Textiles Dissertation

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2019 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: Design
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Undergraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

In this subject students undertake a self-directed conceptual research dissertation that supports their individual practice-led studio design research in fashion and textiles. Students develop critical research skills by engaging in fashion and textile theory discourse and exploring related research methodologies that expand their understanding of praxis (the dynamic relationship between theory and practice in design). Critical and reflective design thinking skills are refined, allowing students to add conceptual depth and contextual breadth to their design research practice. Existing skills in academic reading, writing, research and referencing conventions are developed. This research-based subject assists students to develop skills for postgraduate study in a supported learning environment and affords opportunities to hone written and oral communication, promoting synthesis and concise communication of conceptual design ideas.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. demonstrate an understanding of the historical and contemporary context of fashion in society
2. effectively analyse research data and assimilate findings into theoretical outcomes
3. demonstrate a high level of competency in communicating visually and verbally and written formats
4. critique, analyse and evaluate the relationship between design practice and fashion theory
5. effectively demonstrate the ability to understand theoretical concepts to innovative design outcomes.
6. communicate with professional clarity and accuracy

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes:

  • Demonstrated understanding of appropriate academic and professional practice in the acknowledgement of others' work and ideas (A.4)
  • Advanced communication skills for industry professional context (C.1)
  • Advanced written communication skills (C.2)
  • Problem solving approaches to a global fashion context (I.3)
  • Ability to innovate existing fashion practices and system (I.4)
  • Advanced engagement with professional and global fashion industry practices (P.2)
  • Ability to develop sophisticated arguments and rationales (R.1)
  • Ability to analyse and synthesise complex ideas (R.2)
  • Ability to use a variety of research methodologies (R.3)

Teaching and learning strategies

Students will be encouraged to undertake individual research into Fashion & Textiles theory (drawing from many sub-disciplines within the humanities), to inform their conceptual design thinking and contextualize practice through a critical engagement with theoretical discourse. This will include reflective strategies where students explore their unique design philosophy and how this relates to contemporary design practice and theory. Learning and teaching strategies will be based on independent research; academic reading, research, writing and referencing conventions; reflective thinking and writing; design thinking; and collaborative peer-to-peer discussion and critique supported by individual weekly consultation with tutors to support self-directed projects. This subject has been designed to include formative and summative feedback opportunities with assessment tasks that develop research, writing and oral presentation skills. These critical research skills support students in their studio-based work by bringing conceptual and contextual breadth to their practice.

The subject takes the student through the research process and the research methodologies and frameworks to understand how theory is embedded in to design practice. This takes place through weekly formative feedback in consultation with your tutor. This will will address the content of work and a student's approach to learning. It is designed to help students iteratively improve the quality of the final dissertation. For this to occur students need to respond constructively to the feedback provided on a week to week basis.

Formative feedback will be provided during the learning process, typically provided verbally by the subject's teaching staff. It will address the content of work and a student's approach to learning, both in general and more specific ‘assessment orientated’ terms. It is designed to help students improve their performance in time for the submission of an assessment item. For this to occur students need to respond constructively to the feedback provided. This involves critically reflecting on advice given and in response altering the approach taken to a given assessment. Formative feedback may also, on occasion, be provided by other students. It is delivered informally, either in conversation during a tutorial or in the course of discussion at the scale of the whole class. It is the student’s responsibility to record any feedback given during meetings or studio sessions.

Summative feedback is provided in written form with all assessed work. It is published along with indicative grades online at UTS REVIEW. Summative feedback focuses on assessment outcomes. It is used to indicate how successfully a student has performed in terms of specific assessment criteria.

Content (topics)

Students will undertake research into Fashion Theory, Textiles Theory or Fashion History depending upon the nature of their individual dissertation research question. This subject develops a student's ability to effectively critique and analyse research material and develop this into a written project.

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Research Proposal and Presentation

Intent:

Develop a research proposal in response to a chosen theme. Clearly communicate your design question, your initial research findings and your theoretical/methodological approach. Identify examples that indicate your understanding of the dynamic relationship between theory and practice in design.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 3, 4 and 6

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.4, C.1, I.4, R.1 and R.2

Type: Presentation
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 35%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Effective written and oral communication skills 30 3 C.1
Academic referencing skills 14 6 A.4
Show an understanding of how fashion is underpinned by contemporary culture 14 1 R.2
Ability to construct well supported arguments and rationale.. 14 4 R.1
Demonstrated ability to effectively analyse and synthesise theoretical outcomes into design practice. 14 4 I.4
Ability to utilise, analyse and synthesise a variety of methods including visual research. 14 2 R.2
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Reflective Journal

Intent:

Maintain a weekly reflective journal around your chosen theme. Explore and analyse your ongoing investigation into the relationship between contemporary culture and contemporary design practice and theory through reflective commentary and collating of both written and visual material with an end to developing your unique design philosophy.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

2, 4, 5 and 6

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

I.3, P.2, R.2 and R.3

Type: Journal
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 15%
Length:

See assessment brief for detailed information

Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Demonstrate creative approaches to problem solving and an ability to challenge boundaries and take risks 20 5 I.3
Demonstrate curiosity and an enquiring approach to the design process. 20 4 P.2
Demonstrate an ability to reflect on the relationship between research and design practice and to interpret complex ideas. 20 2 R.2
Ability to use a variety of research methods including visual research. 20 2 R.3
Ability to demonstrate self-directed learning. 20 6 P.2
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 3: Dissertation

Intent:

Prepare a written research dissertation that effectively analyses fashion theory research around a chosen theme. Develop critical research skills by engaging in fashion and textile theory discourse to explore and expand your understanding of the dynamic relationship between theory and practice in design.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 3, 4 and 6

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.4, C.2, I.4 and R.2

Type: Essay
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 50%
Length:

See assessment brief for detailed information

Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Show an understanding of how fashion is underpinned by contemporary culture. 17 1 R.2
Effective and clear communication 17 3 C.2
Academic referencing skills 15 6 A.4
Ability to provide clear evidence in support of critical thinking and or a conceptual claim 17 2 R.2
A clear understanding of the relationship between theory and practice 17 4 I.4
Capacity to interpret complex ideas 17 6 R.2
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Minimum requirements

Students are expected to attend a miniumum of 80% of all scheduled classes, contribute to class discussion and participate in assessable presentations.

Required texts

There are no essential readings. This subject is project based and readings will be project specific in consultation with the student’s supervisor.

Some further suggested readings will be available on UTS online throughout the course.

Fashion & Textile Journals

Fashion theory: the journal of dress, body & culture

Fashion practice

Journal of Textile Design Research and Practice

Vestoj

Recommended texts

Barnard, M. (ed.), 2007, Fashion theory: a reader, Routledge, London & New York.

Barnes, R. 1992, Dress and gender: making & meaning, Berg Publications.

Barthes, R. 2006, The language of fashion, Stafford, A. & Carter, M. (eds.), Power Publications, Sydney.

Bartlett, D, Cole, S. & Rocamora, A. (eds), 2013, Fashion media: past and present, Bloomsbury, London.

Baudelaire, C. 1995. The painter of modern life and other essays. J. Mayne (trans. and ed.), Phaidon, London.

Black, P. 2017. Smile, particularly in bad weather: the era of the Australian airline hostess, UWA PUblishing, Cawley WA.

Breward, C. & Gilbert, D. 2006, Fashion’s world cities, Berg, Oxford & New York.

Breward, C. & Evans, C. 2005, Fashion and modernity, Berg, Oxford & New York.

Bruzzi, S. & Church Gibson, P. (eds), 2013. Fashion cultures revisited: theories, explorations and analysis. Routledge, London & New York.

Carter, M. 2003, Fashion classics: from Carlyle to Barthes, Berg, Oxford & New York.

Craik, J. 2009, Fashion: the key concepts, Berg, Oxford & New York.

Craik, J. 2005, Uniforms exposed: from continuity to transgression, Berg, Oxford & New York.

Davis, F. 1992, Fashion, culture and identity, University of Chicago Press, Chicago & London.

Eicher, J. B. & Evenson. S. L. 2015, The visible self: global perspectives on dress, culture, and society, 4th edn, Bloomsbury, London.

Entwistle, J. 2015 [2000], The fashioned body: fashion, dress and modern social theory, 2nd edn, Polity, Cambridge.

Evans, C. 2013, The mechanical smile: modernism and the first fashion shows in France and America, 1900-1929, Yale University Press, New Haven and London.

Evans, C. 2003, Fashion at the edge: spectacle, modernity and deathliness. Yale University Press, New Haven and London.

Findlay, R. 2017, Appearances: personal style blogs, Intellect, Bristol and Chicago.

Findlay, R. & Card, A. (eds), 2018, About performance: fashioning performance/performing dress, Special Issue, No 16. https://search.informit.com.au/browsePublication;py=2018;res=IELHSS;issn=1324-6089;iss=16

Flugel, J.C. 1966, The psychology of clothes, Hogarth Press.

Francis, P. 2009, Inspiring writing in art and design: taking a line for a write, Intellect, Bristol & Chicago.

Garber, M. 1992, Vested interests: cross dressing & cultural anxiety, Routledge.

Gray, S. 2017, Friends, fashion & fabulousness: the making of an Australian style, Australian Scholarly Publishing, Melbourne.

Harrison, M. 1991. Appearances: fashion photography since 1945. Rizzoli, New York.

Hebdige, D. 1979, Subculture: the meaning of style, Routledge, London & New York.

Hollander, A. 1975, Seeing through clothes, University of California Press, Berkeley, Los Angeles & London.

Konig, R. 1978, The restless image: a sociology of fashion, Allen & Unwin.

Laver, J. 1969, Modesty in dress, Heinemann.

Lehmann, U. 2000, Tigersprung: fashion in modernity. The MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass & London.

Lewis, R. (ed.), 2013, Modest fashion: styling bodies, meditating faith, I.b. Tauris, London.

McLean, A. (ed.) 2016, Costume, makeup and hair, Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, New Jersey.

McNeil, P. (ed) 2009, The men’s fashion reader, Berg, Oxford & New York.

McNeil, P. (ed) 2008, Fashion: critical and primary sources, Berg, Oxford & New York.

Miller-Spillman, K. A., Reilly, A. & Hunt-Hurst, P. (eds) 2012, The Meanings of Dress, 3rd edn, Fairchild Books Inc, New York.

Rees-Roberts, N. 2018, Fashion film: art and advertising in the digital age, Bloomsbury Visual Arts, London & New York.

Riello, G. & McNeil, P. (eds) 2010, The fashion history reader: global perspectives, Routledge, New York.

Rocamora, A, & Smelik, A. (eds), 2016, Thinking through fashion :a guide to key theorists, I.B.Tauris, London.

Shinkle, E. (ed.), 2008, Fashion as photograph: viewing and reviewing images of fashion. I.B. Tauris, London & New York.

Steele, V. (ed) 2010, The BERG Companion to Fashion, Berg, Oxford & New York.

Troy, N.J. 2003, Couture culture: a study in modern art and fashion, The MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass. & London.

Wilson, E. 2007 [1985], Adorned in dreams: fashion and modernity, I.B.Tauris, London.

Welters, L. & Lillethun, A. (eds) 2011, The Fashion Reader, 2nd edn, Bloomsbury, Oxford & New York.

References

Databases and Online Resources

UTS library subject guide Fashion & Textiles: http://www.lib.uts.edu.au/guides/design/fashion-and-textile-design

Berg Fashion Library; Bloomsbury Fashion Central; Fairchild Books Library; Fashion Photography Archive. Available through UTS library https://www-bloomsburyfashioncentral-com.ezproxy.lib.uts.edu.au

The Vogue Archive. Available through UTS library https://search-proquest-com.ezproxy.lib.uts.edu.au/vogue/index?accountid=17095

www.businessoffashion.com

www.firstview.com

www.hintmag.com

Women's Wear Daily: http://www.wwd.com/

The Fashion Studies Journal www.fashionstudiesjournal.org/

Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies Journals, LGBTQ Center, Brown University.

www.brown.edu/campus-life/support/lgbtq/gender-sexuality-and-feminist-studies-journals

Other resources

UTS library Harvard referencing guide: http://www.lib.uts.edu.au/help/referencing