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49680 Value Chain Engineering Systems

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Engineering: Professional Practice and Leadership
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Postgraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

Value chains have become the central feature of operations management in applying engineering systems to commercial and industrial processes in the modern economy. The emphasis in this subject is on the action 'to engineer' through holistically drawing upon the full range of sciences from engineering, information technology and service sciences, management and operations strategy. The goal is to engineer value chains for productivity, quality, performance, compliance, growth, risk-sharing and learning improvement.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:

1. Demonstrate the components in the Value chain and Supply chain Demand Chain, Warehousing and Distribution Centre, Transportation, Procurement, Supplier, Product Strategy, Operations and Global Strategy.
2. Explain the relationship between Business Strategy, Value Chain strategic options and change management.
3. Analyse DC, transport, procurement and other components in the Value Chain Creating and Maintaining Value, Reducing Obsolescence, ensuring Effectiveness and Efficiency.
4. Illustrate Strategic Options and quantify the benefit (tangible and intangible) and the risk to achieving the expected outcomes.
5. Apply research skills and appropriate methodologies to solve Value chain problems.
6. Identify key value chain drivers for Australian and global economies.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the development of the following faculty Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs) and Engineers Australia (EA) Stage 1 competencies:

  • Identify and apply relevant problem-solving methodologies (B.1)
  • Design components, systems and/or processes to meet required specifications (B.2)
  • Apply decision-making methodologies to evaluate solutions for efficiency, effectiveness and sustainability (B.4)
  • Demonstrate research skills (B.6)
  • Apply abstraction, mathematics and/or discipline fundamentals to analysis, design and operation (C.1)
  • Manage own time and processes effectively by prioritising competing demands to achieve personal goals (Manage self) (D.1)
  • Communicate effectively in ways appropriate to the discipline, audience and purpose (E.1)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

Engineers Australia Stage 1 competencies
Students enrolled in the Master of Professional Engineering Practice should note that this subject contributes to the assurance of Engineers Australia Stage 1 competencies: 1.3, 1.5, 1.6, 2.4.

Teaching and learning strategies

Value Chain Engineering Systems engages students in a practical way using data based on real world industrial problems.

Students access UTSOnline proformas, readings and case studies before class each week, to prepare for discussions by orientating themselves with the topic. In class, students work in groups and use these materials to define problems and collaboratively create and present solutions to them.

Students engage in classes with audio-visual presentations and potential industry expert guest speakers. Students interact with industry expectations to engage them in a purposeful way. Classes are organised for students to work in practical settings where they relate real world data using supply chain analytics. At every stage, students discuss as a group to find solutions.

Students bring their own devices to Excel Lab and here students engage in further group work. The group class work is reflective of industry needs and projections for improvement using data analytics. Industry experts inspire deeper group discussions to help students identify and analyse real world value chain systems challenges.

Weekly verbal feedback from the facilitator guides students in active learning opportunities. This feedback guides students toward developing deeper understanding and specialised skills to use in real world situations.

Content (topics)

  • New Value Chain Engineering
  • Supply Chain
  • Forecasting and Demand Management
  • Warehousing, Storage and Distribution
  • Strategic Operations/Operations Management
  • Global Supply, Demand and Operations
  • Transportation in a Supply Chain
  • Modelling and Decision Making
  • Sourcing Materials and Services - Procurement
  • Real Options exercise
  • Value Chain Risk Management
  • Value Chain Case Studies

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Supply Chain Analytics

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1 and 3

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes (CILOs):

B.1, B.2, B.4, B.6, C.1, D.1 and E.1

Type: Report
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 20%
Length:

750 - 1000 Words and Data Analysis with Excel

Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Correctness and clarity of answers 20 1, 3 C.1
Identify and justify appropriate strategies to solve the problem 30 1, 3 B.1, B.2, B.4
Depth and complexity of research 20 1 B.6
Professionalism of report 30 1, 3 D.1, E.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Engineering the Value Chain

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

2, 3, 4 and 5

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes (CILOs):

B.1, B.2, B.4, B.6, C.1, D.1 and E.1

Type: Report
Groupwork: Group, group assessed
Weight: 30%
Length:

It is expected that your group report shall be about 12 to 15 pages, though this will vary depending upon your apporach to the problem and issues.

Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Identify and justify appropriate strategies and solutions to solve the problem. 40 2, 4 B.1, B.2, B.4
Depth and complexity of research 40 3, 5 B.6
Correctness, clarity and professional report 20 2, 3, 4, 5 C.1, D.1, E.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 3: Final Examination

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

2, 3, 4 and 5

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes (CILOs):

B.1, B.2, B.4, B.6 and C.1

Type: Examination
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 50%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Correctness and clarity of answers 30 2, 3, 4, 5 C.1
Identify and justify appropriate strategies to solve the problem 20 2, 3, 4, 5 B.1, B.2
Correctness and justification to solve the problem 30 2, 3, 4, 5 B.4
Demonstrated ability to identify and locate knowledge to address a problem 20 2, 3, 4, 5 B.6
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Minimum requirements

In order to pass the subject, a student must achieve an overall mark of 50% or more.

Required texts

Supply Chain Management, Chopra and Meindl, 6th Edition, 2015, Pearson.

Recommended texts

Strategic Operations Management: a value chain approach, Walters, David and Rainbird, Mark, 2007, Palgrave Macmillan

Introduction to Management Science, Bernard W Taylor III, , Eleventh Edition, 2013, Pearson

Operations Management, Processes and Supply Chains, Lee. J. Krajewski, Tenth Edition, 2013, Pearson

Supply Chain Management: A Logistics Perspective, Coyle, Langley, Gibson & Novack, 9th Edition, 2012, Cengage

Transportation: A supply chain perspective, Coyle, Novack, Gibson & Bardi, 9th Edition, 2011, Cengage

Supply Chain Logistics Management, Bowersox, Closs and Cooper, 4th Edition, 2013, McGraw Hill

Supplementary Class Notes are available on UTSOnline.

Other readings will be advised in lectures

References

Additional References will be advised in class and on UTSOnline