University of Technology, Sydney

Staff directory | Webmail | Maps | Newsroom | What's on

42043 Robotics Studio 1

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Engineering: Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering
Credit points: 12 cp

Subject level:

Postgraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

This is a studio subject. It is not a conventional subject guided by a set curriculum. Its purpose is to provide an environment in which students can gain and simultaneously translate knowledge into a robotics system. Studios are product-based subjects, largely conducted in the studio, in collaboration with other students, academic staff and industry mentors. Students do a combination of individual self-directed study and project work.

This is the first studio in the fundamentals stage of the Robotics Engineering major. The major has three studios situated in the following stages: fundamentals; applications; and professional. The stages of the projects are the means by which students learn how to apply their knowledge to what they can achieve. The stages follow the classic engineering paradigm of assess, design and implement.

The objective of this studio is to introduce students to the multidisciplinary field of robotics engineering in both theory and practice. It aims to familiarise students with the robotics topics of mathematics, hardware and software, control and planning, sensing and perception motivated by real-world applications. Individual tasks in this studio are guided by a learning contract established at the beginning of the session.

What differentiates the applications studio from the fundamentals studio is the expectation of the level of proficiency of students. Once students have completed the fundamentals and applications studios and a range of coursework subjects, it is expected that they have the skills and knowledge to allow them to undertake the development of more challenging products in the final studio.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:

1. Engage with stakeholders to identify a problem
2. Apply design thinking to respond to a defined or newly identified problem
3. Apply technical skills to develop, model and/or evaluate design
4. Demonstrate effective collaboration
5. Conduct critical self and peer review and performance evaluation
6. Gain an overview of the established technologies associated with industrial robots and the components that make up a robotic system
7. Gain an understanding of the traditional principles of operation of robot motion systems, such as conventions used in robot kinematics and dynamics frames of reference or basic control strategies
8. Be familiar with trajectory planning and control of industry robots for different applications
9. Examine advanced topics in robotics that deal with collision avoidance and optimization for robot trajectory planning and control

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the development of the following faculty Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs) and Engineers Australia (EA) Stage 1 competencies:

  • Apply systems thinking to understand complex system behaviour including interactions between components and with other systems (social, cultural, legislative, environmental, business etc.) (A.5)
  • Design components, systems and/or processes to meet required specifications (B.2)
  • Apply abstraction, mathematics and/or discipline fundamentals to analysis, design and operation (C.1)
  • Develop models using appropriate tools such as computer software, laboratory equipment and other devices (C.2)
  • Evaluate model applicability, accuracy and limitations (C.3)
  • Communication and coordination (E.0)
  • Communicate effectively in ways appropriate to the discipline, audience and purpose (E.1)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

This subject develops the student’s knowledge of general robotic engineering principles. To that end, this subject contributes to the following FEIT Graduate Attributes:

(A5 systems thinking: robotic devices exhibit complex interactions between the physical components. Students will need to learn this.

(B2) Design: students will apply a systematic approach to the design process for robotic systems

(C1) Apply abstraction: significant mathematical fundamentals form a core component of elements such as kinematics or dynamics.

(C2, C3) Develop models, Evaluate Models: students will put learning into practice by developing and testing models of the various disciplines learnt (kinematics, dynamics and control) in a simulation environment.

(E1) Communicate effectively: students will be required to function effectively as individuals and become aware of the relevance of individual roles within the context of team groups.

(E2) Teams: students will work in groups and demonstrate the outcomes of their major projects to their peers. Reports outlining relevant needs and outcomes will be prepared as part of the subject.

Teaching and learning strategies

Class activities include discussion and elaboration of online content, as well as active hands on work. The first 5 weeks of the studio leverage online content, students are expected to go through online materials and videos before coming to the class as given in the program so that they are well prepared for the class activities

Studio is carried out through Individual activities:

1. At the beginning of the Studio, the student starts a Personal Design Journal

2. The individual demonstrates through a series of quizzes basic competencies required for projects envisaged in the studio

3. At week 5 students start to formalise the individual learning contract (ILC)

4. At week 7 the student agrees to the ILC with the subject coordinator

5. The student will have an opportunity to revisit the ILC during the session if required.

6. The student presents progress at Week 9 as per ILC

7. The student delivers a peer teaching component in Week 11 as per ILC

8. Demonstration of the project is carried out in Week 12.

The faculty expects a commitment of eighteen hours per week for the Studio, six hours of which occur during scheduled Studio time. Students are expected to attend the six-hour sessions each week. This is the time when individual students and staff meet to discuss ILCs and 'teach' the class activities, industry visitors present talks on interesting topics, demonstrations and presentations occur and 'teach' the class sessions occur.

Ultimately, learning is the student's responsibility. It is an aim of this subject to help students develop strategies that will enable them to more effectively undertake the responsibility of learning. These strategies will help students throughout the rest of their course and later in practice.

Content (topics)

The following topics will be covered:

Robotic maths

  • 2D transforms,
  • basic filtering,
  • basic probability

Software and hardware

  • Basic C++ in ROS (in Linux),
  • basic Matlab,
  • basic designs,
  • version control,
  • documentation (doxygen, wiki)

Planning and Control

  • Basic planning 2D,
  • low level control

Sensing and Perception

  • Laser range finder ( modeling, noise)
  • 2D basic mapping
  • basic localization

Basic research project skills

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Review Quizzes

Intent:

Test the student’s knowledge of programming, sensing and control in an incremental manner. Provide feedback to students throughout the session.

Objective(s):

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes (CILOs):

C.1

Type: Quiz/test
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 20%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Correctness of answer 60 C.1
Justification of results 40 C.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Individual Learning Contract Agreement

Intent:

Creation of an Individual Learning Contract allows students to identify and document their learning direction, and set goals for the session.

Objective(s):

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes (CILOs):

E.0

Type: Portfolio
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 10%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Evaluate personal needs to complete a task 34 E.0
Identify activities to satisfy those needs that demonstrate depth and academic challenge 33 E.0
Identify suitable things to 'teach' their pee 33 E.0
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 3: Individual Learning Contract Finalisation

Intent:

Creation of an Individual Learning Contract allows students to identify and document their learning direction, and set goals for the session.

Objective(s):

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes (CILOs):

E.0

Type: Portfolio
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 30%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Evaluate personal needs to complete a task 20 E.0
Identified and successfully carried the activities to satisfy those needs, demonstration at mid-project milestone 40 E.0
Identify suitable things to ‘teach’ their peers and ‘successfully’ teach them 40 E.0
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 4: Project Demonstration / Delivery

Intent:

Students demonstrate their ability to deliver a Product or Prototype to an agreed scope. In doing so, students also demonstrate their capacity to solve problems, create solutions, work with teams, communicate professionally, and manage time and tasks.

Objective(s):

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes (CILOs):

A.5, B.2, C.1, C.2, C.3 and E.1

Type: Project
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 30%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Evaluation of the requirements 20 A.5, B.2, C.1
Meeting the specifications at the demonstration 50 A.5, B.2, C.1, C.2, C.3
Report on the details of the project (prototype) 15 E.1
Details of activities and timelines that will achieve the Product/Prototype and evidence of following these items 15 A.5, B.2, C.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 5: Personal Design Journal

Intent:

Creation of a Personal Design Journal that allows each student to record and reflect on their process and experiences in completing both their Individual Learning Contract as well as their project (product) journey.

Objective(s):

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes (CILOs):

A.5, B.2, C.1, C.2, C.3, E.0 and E.1

Type: Journal
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 10%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Shows regular use: Journal shows entries created at each work session 20 A.5, B.2, E.1
Records and reflects: Journal records key items, reflects on the way they arose and their effect on product development 20 A.5, B.2, C.1, C.2, C.3, E.0
Documents learning: Journal documents what the author learned from the experience 20 A.5, B.2, C.1
Systematic approach: Journal demonstrates a systematic approach to the development process including feedback from other students / staff 20 A.5, B.2, C.1, C.2, C.3, E.0, E.1
Level of completeness: journal records ideas, key results, successes, dead ends and failures 20 A.5, B.2
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Minimum requirements

In order to pass the subject, a student must achieve an overall mark of 50% or more.

References

Programming for Mechatronic Systems

[1] Elliot B. Koffman & Paul A.T. Wolfgang, Objects, Abstraction, Data Structures and Design Using C++, John Wiley & Sons, Inc
ISBN 0-471-46755-3

[2] Roberts, E.,Programming abstractions in C++, Pearson, 2014

[3] D. Ryan Stephens; Christopher Diggins; Jonathan Turkanis, Jeff Cogswell, C++ Cookbook, O'Reilly Media, Inc., 2005

[4] Lippman, Stanley B, C++ primer, Addison-Wesley, 2005

Sensors and Control

[1] Nixon, Mark S, Feature extraction & image processing for computer vision, Oxford : Academic, 2012

[2] Introduction to Sensors for Ranging and Imaging by Graham Brooker, Sci Tech Publishing Inc., 2009

[3] Image Processing Toolbox, https://au.mathworks.com/products/image.html

[4] Image Acquisition Toolbox, https://au.mathworks.com/products/imaq.html

[5] Camera Calibration Toolbox, http://www.vision.caltech.edu/bouguetj/calib_doc/

[6] Katsuhiko Ogata, Modern Control Engineering, (3rd Edition)

[7] Jefferey B. Burl, Linear Optimal Control, Addison Wesley.

[8] Control Tutorial for MATLAB, http://www.engin.umich.edu/group/ctm/state/state.html

[9] J.M. MacIejowski, Multivariable Feedback Design, Addison-Wesley, 1989

[10] Branislav Kisacanin, Gyan C. Agarwal, Linear Control Systems: With Solved Problems and MATLAB Examples

[11] Control system toolbox, http://www.mathworks.com/products/control/

[12] Katsuhiko Ogata, Discrete-Time Control Systems (2nd Edition)