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16232 Property and Political Economy

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2018 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: School of the Built Environment
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Undergraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

Requisite(s): 16235 Urban Economics

Description

This subject develops four fundamental themes in property economics, namely: (i) core concepts, theories, and approaches in property rights debates, (ii) property, the extractive industries, and society, (iii) political economy of Indigenous property rights, and (iv) property and the green economy. The subject is global in orientation, but draws on examples and experiences from Australia and the Asia-Pacific region.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject students will have achieved the following:

1. comprehend and be able to explain the property basis of global social problems
2. evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of contested perspectives on property and social problems, while presenting convincing and reasoned arguments to a variety of audiences
3. critically analyse existing property-based proposals for reform grounded in careful reasoning and systematic research; and
4. apply the skills developed in property and political economy to real world problems in conditions under which property economists work.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the faculty's five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (see 'Graduate Attribute Development') through the following course intended learning outcomes:

  • Ability to identify ethical issues and concerns (A.1)
  • Ability to apply informed sound ethical judgements in professional contexts (A.2)
  • Ability to effectively apply a variety of communication skills and technologies in professional contexts (C.1)
  • Ability to work effectively in a team in a professional context (C.2)
  • Openness to consideration of creative and innovative ideas (I.1)
  • Ability to develop alternative, appropriate creative solutions to built environment issues (I.2)
  • Ability to apply economic theory in analysing property markets (I.3)
  • Ability to apply knowledge of law and regulations in built environment contexts (P.6)
  • Ability to apply knowledge of sustainability and environmental issues in built environment contexts (P.7)
  • Ability to engage in critical and reflective thinking in built environment contexts (R.1)
  • Ability to demonstrate judgement in critical analysis of independent research (R.4)

Teaching and learning strategies

The subject is presented in three sessions: (1) tutorials (2) lectures, and (3) debates. Students are expected to contextualise their evolving understanding of property and the political economy through a series of lenses, or approaches, in different societies and at different periods. In each week, students must do a series of readings and do their own research on weekly debates before coming to class to critically review the readings, interpret, analyse, and articulate a range of perspectives and ultimately assert and demonstrate their own perspectives in discussions and structured, formal debates.

Content (topics)

Specifically, the subject develops four main themes, namely (a) core concepts and methods in property and political economy, (b) Mineral Property and Property Rights, (c) Political Economy of Indigenous Property Rights; and (d) Alternative Property Rights & Regimes.

Some of the topics studied are Global land grab, Natural resources, land tenure, and conflict, Contamination, pollution and property.

Assessment

Assessment task 1: A critical review of any one of the readings

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

, 1, 3 and 4

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

C.1, C.2, I.1, I.3, P.6 and P.7

Type: Essay
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 20%
Length:

Further information:

Word limits and expectations will be provided in the detailed assignment brief.

Assessment task 2: Debate engagement and Class participation (Weekly contributions to tutorials, lectures, and debates [when not a debater])

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

, 1, 2, 3 and 4

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.1, C.1, I.3, P.6 and P.7

Type: Exercises
Groupwork: Group, individually assessed
Weight: 30%
Length:

Further information:

Expectations will be provided in the detailed assignment brief.

Assessment task 3: End of semester examination

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

, 1, 2, 3 and 4

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.1, A.2, C.1, I.1, I.2, I.3, P.7, R.1 and R.4

Type: Examination
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 50%

Minimum requirements

All students MUST attend at least 80% of classes. Attendance means being present for at least 80 per cent of the 3-hour meeting.

References

A selection of readings offering a diversity of perspectives on each theme will be made available via UTSonline. Journals such as Journal of Australian Political Economy, Journal of Economic Issues, Journal of Institutional Economics, Review of Radical Political Economics, Review of African Political Economy, Revista de Economia Politica, Land Use Policy, Journal of Agrarian Change, Resources Policy, Extractive Industries and Society, Journal of Peasant Studies, Review of Black Political Economy, Journal of Property Research, and Indigenous Law Bulletin can be very helpful. No single textbook is required, but some students have found Frank Stilwell's textbook (Stilwell F, 2012, Political Economy: The Contest of Economic Ideas. Melbourne: Oxford University Press) very useful.