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15319 Project Risk, Procurement and Quality Management

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: School of the Built Environment
Credit points: 6 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

This subject explores and develops the key concepts and techniques necessary to understand and practise the core project management competencies of risk, quality and procurement management. Topics in risk management include planning for and identifying risks, performing risk analysis, and responding to and controlling risks. Topics in procurement management include planning, conducting, controlling and closing procurement activities. Topics in quality management include planning for quality, performing quality assurance and controlling. Students work independently and in small groups on a range of assessment tasks. This subject contributes to the graduate attributes of critical thinking, communication and an ability to apply tools and techniques and adapt project management knowledge to meet contextual demands, relative to industry practice.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. Prepare appropriate risk, procurement and quality management plans for projects
2. Use core tools and techniques to identify and resolve risk, procurement and quality issues in projects
3. Link risk, procurement and quality concepts to the project framework
4. Demonstrate a reflective and professional approach to project management practice

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes:

  • Ability to effectively use oral communication in projects at a professional level (Oral Communication) (C.1)
  • Ability to effectively use written communication in projects at a professional level (Written Communication) (C.2)
  • Ability to source and apply tools and techniques to meet contextual demands (Technique Application) (I.1)
  • Ability to apply foundational project management knowledge in projects (Foundational Knowledge) (P.1)
  • Ability to apply methods and tools to analyse data and information for managing projects (Information Analysis) (P.4)
  • Ability to think critically and synthesise complex data (Critical Engagement) (R.1)

Teaching and learning strategies

This subject is offered face-to-face in an intensive block workshop and incorporates a range of teaching and learning strategies:

Strategy 1- Students' Preparation for Learning: Online references and resource materials are provided prior to the block workshop to familiarise students with the subject contents. Learning from pre-workshop readings and its applications will be assessed by an online quiz, which is to be viewed prior to the block workshop. Students will be engaged through the use of pre-workshop readings and online quiz and engender problem-based learning.

Strategy 2- Lectures: Lecturers and guest lecturers from practice engage students in principal concepts and fundamental tools and techniques in project risk, procurement and quality management. Students are welcome and indeed encouraged to ask questions during lectures. Several real and hypothetical examples are used to contextualise learning and practice applications of the tools. Lectures are a key learning resource in this subject and the presentation slides are available for student review via UTS Online prior to the workshop.

Strategy 3- Collaborative Problem Solving: During lectures students will work together and learn collaboratively in small groups solving problems that are directly related to the subject content covered during the lectures. This approach will assist students in applying and demonstrating their learning through cases involving hypothetical and actual scenarios. Students will be requested to present their group solutions during lectures, which provides a great opportunity for learning from peers.

Strategy 4- Online learning: UTS Online is where students access material for self-directed learning and engage in student-led discussion on key topics. Presentation slides are available for review on UTS Online. Students can share their questions and ideas on the open discussion forum, with prompt guidance and feedback from the subject coordinator.

Strategy 5- Ongoing Feedback: Structured feedback is provided individually, to each tutorial and to the subject group about daily group activities, pre-workshop quiz and final assignment. There will be opportunities to receive immediate feedback during the workshop. Detailed guidance as to the assessment criteria and the provision of timely feedback will form an important part of the learning process. It is the student's responsibility to record any feedback supplied during meetings or sessions. Summative feedback is published along with indicative grades online at UTS ReView. Summative feedback focusses on assessment outcomes. It is used to indicate how successfully a student has performed in terms of specific assessment criteria.

Content (topics)

  1. Overview of project management principles to highlight the role of risk, procurement and quality management in delivering project success.
  2. Risk management: Plan risk management; identify risks; perform qualitative and quantitative risk analysis; plan risk responses; and control/manage risks.
  3. Procurement management: Plan procurement management; conduct, control and close procurements.
  4. Quality management: Plan quality management; perform quality assurance and control/manage quality.
  5. Essential aspects of stakeholder management relevant to risks, procurement and quality management,
  6. Applying risk, procurement and quality management principles in project contracting and tendering.

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Pre-workshop assignment

Intent:

Obtain an overview of the subject prior to attending lectures.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

I.1

Type: Quiz/test
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 10%
Length:

There will be twenty random multiple choice questions.

Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Assessment of the pre-workshop quiz will be based on how well the answers demonstrate an understanding of project risk, procurement and quality management and their application in project environments. 100 1 I.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Exercises on topics presented in class

Intent:

Demonstrate competency in understanding the relationship between procurement, risk and quality concepts and their impact on project scope, execution, monitoring and control.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 3 and 4

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

C.1, I.1, P.1, P.4 and R.1

Type: Exercises
Groupwork: Group, group assessed
Weight: 30%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Ability to effectively use oral communication to demonstrate applied knowledge in practical situations 20 1 C.1
Demonstrate an understanding of how to integrate and apply project management concepts, knowledge and processes in managing risk, procurement and quality aspects of a project 30 2 I.1
Ability to apply advanced project management knowledge to assist decision making process in the area of risk, procurement and quality 30 3 P.1
Ability to apply methods and tools to analyse data and information for managing risk, procurement and quality 10 4 P.4
Ability to think critically and synthesise complex data 10 4 R.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 3: Final assignment

Intent:

To assess the knowledge gained in the subject through the session.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 3 and 4

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

C.2, I.1, P.1, P.4 and R.1

Type: Essay
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 60%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Clearly written essay that analyses issues, recommends solutions and presents effective reflection on learning experience 20 1 C.2
Ability to source and apply tools and techniques to meet contextual demands through integrated management of project risk, procurement and quality 30 2 I.1
Ability to effectively apply foundational project management knowledge in project environment, with special focus on risk, procurement and quality aspects of projects 30 3 P.1
Ability to apply methods and tools to analyse data and information for managing risk, procurement and quality 10 4 P.4
Ability to think critically and synthesise complex data 10 4 R.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Minimum requirements

Project Management students are required to attend 80% of all classes for all enrolled subjects. Achievement of the subject’s aims is difficult if classes are not attended. Where assessment tasks are to be presented personally in class, attendance is mandatory. Pursuant to UTS rule 3.8.2 students who do not satisfy attendance requirements may be refused permission by the Responsible Academic Officer to be considered for assessment for this subject.

Required texts

PMI (2013), A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge, 5th edn, Project Management Institute, Newtown Square, PA.

Required reading prior to workshop available through e-readings from the UTS library.

Recommended texts

AS/NZS ISO 31000:2009 Risk management - Principles and guidelines

Basu, R. (2013). Managing Quality in Projects, Gower, Burlington. (e-book in UTS library)

Chapman, C.B. & Ward. S. (2004). Project Risk Management: Processes, Techniques and Insights, Wiley, Chichester.

Fleming, Q. (2003). Project Procurement Management: Contracting, Subcontracting, Teaming (Publisher)

Larson, E.W. (2014) Project Management: The Managerial Process, 6th edn, McGraw Hill, New York.

Schwalbe, K. (2010) Information Technology Project Management, Course Technology Cengage Learning, Boston.

Wilson, R. (2015) Mastering Risk and Procurement in Project Managment: A Guide to Planning , Controlling, and Resolving Unexpected Problems , FT Press Project Management Series

Larson, E.W. , Honig, B., Gray, C.F., Dantin, U. & Baccarini, D. (2014). Project Management: The Managerial Process, McGraw Hill (Australia) , Sydney.

Project Quality Management: Chapter 8 (pp. 303-353) of Schwalbe. K (2007) Information Technology Project Management, 5th edn., Course Technology Cengage Learning, Boston.

References

AIPM (1996), National Competency Standards for Project Management, Australian Institute of Project Management, Sydney.

Billingham, V. (2008) Project Management: How to Plan and Deliver a Successful Project, Studymates, Abergele.

Chapman< R.J. (xxxx) The Rules of Project Risk Management: Implementation Guidelines for Major Projects (Publisher)

Guth, S. (2009) Project Procurement Management: A Guide ot Structured Procurements, 4th edn. (Locate publisher and place)

Hartley, S. (2003) Project Management – A Competency Based Approach, Prentice Hall, New Jersey. Hillson, D. (2009). Managing Risks in Projects, Gower, Burlington.

Kendrick. T. (2015). Identifying and Managing Project Risk: Essential Tools for Failure Proofing you Project, AMACOM, Place.

Kerzner, H. (2009) Project Management: A Systems Approach to Planning, Scheduling and Controlling, Wiley, New Jersey

Kloppenborg, T.J. and Petrick, J.A. ( (2002) Managign Project Quality (Locate publisher)

Maylor, H. (2005) Project Management, 3rd edn, Pearson, Harlow.

Pries, K.H. and Quigley, J.M. (year). Total Quality Management for Project Management, (Publisher)

Meredith and Mantel (2008) Project Management: A Managerial Approach, 7 edn, Wiley, New Jersey.