University of Technology Sydney

91528 Health and Homeostasis

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Science: Life Sciences
Credit points: 6 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

Central to the work of all health professionals is knowledge of the different parts of the body (anatomy) and an understanding of the processes essential to the health of a person (physiology). This knowledge and understanding underpins insight into the processes underlying human diseases (pathophysiology) and the use and actions of drugs (pharmacology).

This subject provides essential anatomy and physiology for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Nursing program at UTS. Through the guiding principle of homeostasis, the contribution the different organ systems make to maintain a state of wellness is learned. The subject provides points of reference with regard to the activity and structure of individual human organs judged to be well and healthy (e.g. heart rate, lung volume and capacity, and organ architecture). In addition lectures and practicals on basic microbiology, genetics and pharmacology are included.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:

1. Demonstrate your understanding of the overall organisation of the human body
2. Identify the locations and significant structural features of the different organ systems of the human body (circulatory and cardiovascular, endocrine, gastro-intestinal, immune, integumentary, lymphatic, musculo-skeletal, nervous, reproductive, respiratory and urinary)
3. Use your knowledge of the organisation of the body and the structure of the organs to facilitate your understanding of how individual organs carry out their function
4. Apply your knowledge of the functions of individual organs to help you understand how they work together in a system to achieve that system’s functions
5. Bring together your knowledge and understanding of the organ systems to explain their contributions to maintaining the body in a state of homeostasis and thus a state of health and wellness
6. Apply the basic principles of pharmacology (drug administration, drug action and how the body handles drugs) to practice of treating patients with drugs
7. Demonstrate your knowledge the basic types of microorganisms of clinical significance and apply that knowledge to the practice of infection control
8. Demonstrate your understanding of how cells store and consume fuels (i.e. energy metabolism) and apply that knowledge to support your understanding of the body’s responses to feeding and fasting
9. Demonstrate your understanding of how characteristics are passed on from generation to generation and apply that knowledge to predicting patterns of inheritance
10. Investigate the effects of physiological changes on the different organs or systems through clinical case scenarios
11. Apply your knowledge of anatomy, physiology and microbiology to your clinical practice as a nurse

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the development of following course intended learning outcomes:

  • Embody a professional disposition committed to excellence, equity and sustainability (1.0)
  • Communicate and collaborate effectively and respectfully with diverse groups (3.0)
  • Inquire critically to assess a body of evidence to inform practice (4.0)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

Health and Homeostasis is a subject in the Bachelor of Nursing with the objective of teaching anatomy and physiology of the healthy human body.

This subject addresses the following Nursing graduate attributes:

1. Professional disposition

3. Communication and collaboration

4. Knowledge use and translation

This subject addresses the following Science Graduate Attributes:

1. Disciplinary knowledge and its appropriate application

2. An Inquiry-oriented approach

4. Ability to be a lifelong learner

This subject uses face-to-face lectures, online resources and practicals to increase your disciplinary knowledge and to help you learn how this acquired knowledge can be applied to your practice as nurses. You will be able to demonstrate this knowledge in the final exam.

Further to facilitating inquiry, an online discussion forum is available where you can ask your lecturers about how the body works in addition to seeking clarification and information regarding subject content and subject assessment.

In completing the practical workbook you are encouraged to learn via inquiry as you draw upon resources such as textbooks, classroom displays and models, and the internet to complete a number of the exercises. In addition to labelling and drawing exercises, clinical scenarios and questions are incorporated into the practical notes that require you to reflect and apply your acquired disciplinary knowledge.

In the practicals you are encouraged to interact with the other students in the class and academic staff, to ensure that basic concepts are understood. This will contribute to developing your communication skills.

The practicals are designed to encourage you to use several information sources such as the internet and textbooks thereby developing research skills required for continued intellectual development and lifelong learning.

Lifelong learning is also developed through the clinical case scenario analysis assignment where you will be required to use web, digital, and written resources of high quality.

Teaching and learning strategies

This subject involves four weeks of classes comprising 13 contact hours (7 hours of lectures and 6 hours of practicals) per week with non-additional online components.

Subject content is, principally, learned via: face-to-face lectures, online resources and text-based resources. In the case of the face-to-face lectures, there are supporting notes available online. You are encouraged to bring a copy of these notes to the lectures and make them available when watching the online resources. The supporting notes will be available at least three weekdays before the lecture. As you listen to the lecturer you are encouraged to annotate your notes and undertake any in-class labeling exercises. There will be discussions of clinical case scenarios once a week. In the case of the text-based resources, these are provided as a complete set of notes on the topic. The content of these lectures and resources will be assessed in the online quizzes which will contribute to your grade for the subject. The quizzes will also provide you with immediate feedback on your mastery and understanding of the content. After you have completed the quiz, you are shown which answers you got correct and which ones you did not. The material from the face-to-face lectures, online resources, and text-based resources will be assessed summatively in the final exam.

Face-to-face lectures offer you the chance to ask questions. In Health and Homeostasis UTSOnline, a link to a Frequent Answers and Questions (FAQs) is available where you can create a question thread, anonymously if preferred. You can ask your subject coordinator and lecturers about (i) subject content; (ii) other aspects of human anatomy and physiology; (iii) the assessment tasks; (iv) any questions you did not get correct in the quizzes.

There are 3 two-hour-long practicals each teaching week. You are required to attend and a roll is taken. Practicals will provide an opportunity for small group investigations of the anatomical organisation of the body; the anatomy of the several organ systems and specific organs amenable to dissection; and how some physiological functions are monitored. You will also culture micro-organisms present on you and the environment. You will complete a manual in which there are diagrams to label, structures to draw, and questions to answer. The class will be led by casual staff members. The practicals will be held in the Faculty of Science teaching laboratories on the Broadway campus. There will be 2 in-class practical tests to assess your understanding of practical teaching materials. As with the face-to-face lectures, your mastery and understanding of the content will be assessed in the quizzes and the final exam.

The clinical case scenario analysis is provided to aid and assess your capacity to find your own resources that will assist you in analysing a clinical case scenario. This task is a collaborative assignment that will be submitted online.

Content (topics)

The organisation of the human body including regional divisions and surface markers of the human body.

Homeostasis as the underlying process that sustains the normal physiology/functions in a healthy human

The basic structure of the human cell and how materials are transported between the intracellular and extracellular environments

The functions, organisation, principal tissues and organs of the systems of the human body (circulatory and cardiovascular, endocrine, gastro-intestinal, immune, integumentary, lymphatic, musculo-skeletal, nervous, reproductive, respiratory and urinary systems)

The metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins with regard to sustaining the supply of energy to the body

The potential targets for pharmaceuticals; The forms of pharmaceuticals in current and common use; The means by which pharmaceuticals are administered; How the efficacy and safety of pharmaceuticals is determined and monitored. How the body handles drugs.

The different types of micororganisms and the control of their spread in health facilities

The principles of inheritance

Inflammation, burns and wound healing

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Quizzes

Intent:

To give you the opportunity to test your mastery (i.e. knowledge, understanding and application) of the preceding week's content . A high quiz score equates to a high level of mastery. It will also provide a means by which you can see if there are particular parts of the subject where you may need to review the resources further or seek advice from your subject coordinator and class teachers.

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Nursing graduate attribute:

4. Knowledge use and translation

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9

This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):

4.0

Type: Quiz/test
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 30%
Length:

Each online quiz must be completed within 60 minutes, in one attempt/one sitting.

Criteria:

You will be assessed on the correctness of answers to MCQ based on lecture, practical and online material. You will complete four quizzes to determine your mark out of 30.

Assessment task 2: Formal End- of- semester Exam

Intent:

The depth and extent of knowledge of total content will be reflected in the score achieved in the exam.

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Nursing graduate attribute:

4. Knowledge use and its translation

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9

This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):

4.0

Type: Examination
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 40%
Length:

2 hours, plus 10 minutes of reading time

Criteria:

The exam will comprise of 100 multiple choice questions which will examine lecture, online and practical materials. The format of the questions will be the same as that of the online quizzes.

You will be assessed on your disciplinary knowledge as represented by the number of correct answers.

In line with University policy you must obtain a mark of 40% or greater in the formal exam to pass the subject. Under the circumstances where you do not get a mark of 40% or more but your overall mark for the subject is greater than 50, you will be given an "X" grade. This equates to failing the subject just as a “Z” grade does.

Assessment task 3: Clinical Case Scenario Analysis

Intent:

To relate and apply knowledge in anatomy and physiology in clinical cases and develop communications skills using digital media to create and analyse simple clinical case scenarios collaboratively.

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Nursing graduate attributes:

1. Professional disposition

3. Communication and collaboration

4. Knowledge use and translation

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

1, 10, 2, 3, 4 and 5

This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):

1.0, 3.0 and 4.0

Type: Report
Groupwork: Group, group assessed
Weight: 30%
Length:

A brief video, powerpoint or digital media presentation not exceeding 5 minutes

Criteria:

Full marks will be given if you can: (i) identify correctly and logically the tissues and organs involved in the cases; (ii) explain clearly the physiological processes that link the signs and symtoms with the affected tissues and organs in the cases; (iii) present clearly, concisely and effectively the clinical case scenario to illustrate the involved organ systems. A marking rubric will be available on UTS online which you can use in preparing your assignment.

Minimum requirements

Students must obtain a total mark of 50 or more and 40% or more in the formal exam to pass the subject.

If the 40% or more mark is not achieved for the end-of-semester exam, an X grade will be awarded for the subject irrespective of an overall mark greater than 50%.

Students are expected to attend all lectures and practical sessions.

Required texts

Marieb, EN and Hoehn, K. 2019. Human Anatomy and Physiology. 11th ed. England: Pearson Education Limited.

It is essential that health professionals have an Anatomy and Physiology text as part of their work library. You will need a text to help you in completing a number of the practical exercises as well.

Most of the images and teaching materials used in the learning resources are obtained from this book.

With regards to purchasing the textbook, hard copy and eText are available via the following link: https://www.pearson.com.au/9781292261034

There are limited hard copies that can be borrowed and eText which can be accessed from the UTS Library.

Recommended texts

McKinley, MP et al. 2015. Anatomy & Physiology: an integrative approach. 2nd ed. New York: McGraw Hill Education.

If you have a copy of a recommended text already, you can by all means use it.