University of Technology Sydney

87700 VC Special Project Honours

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2022 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: Design
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Honours

Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

This subject is designed to enable students to participate in independent learning opportunities relevant to visual communication research and practice. Such opportunities may include, but are not limited to, visual communication competitions, masterclass projects run by leading industry professionals and live external visual communication projects. Learning is largely independent and self-directed, and framed by an individually designed learning contract.

Students require approval from the visual communication course director to enrol in this subject.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. Confidently develop understandings of Indigenous protocols and principles and how they may be implemented in innovative ways into practice (A3)
2. Critically evaluate and reflect upon one's own research processes and engagement principles (R3)
3. Deeply engage in iterative, practice-led research processes for the development of a complex branding project. (I2)
4. Appraise and implement appropriate technologies, processes and materials in experimental and innovative ways in the context of a complex branding project. (P1)
5. Argue for the value of one’s own practice-oriented research through considered documentation, annotation and participatory processes. (R1)
6. Develop a refined design project through a process of critical reflection, responding to feedback, and iterative refinement (includes analyzing a project brief and develop a project management plan). (C3)
7. Thoughtfully and skillfully present research, process work and design outcomes in visual, oral and written forms (R2)

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes:

  • Apply research-led approaches to design practice (P.1)
  • Independently employ a range of qualitative and practice-led research approaches that are relevant to professional design practice and/or postgraduate study (R.1)
  • Document and articulate the research process to demonstrate rigour and critical thinking (R.2)

Teaching and learning strategies

The subject is delivered in a collaborative studio format. Studios will include theoretical framing, collaborative and individual research tasks, weekly task briefing, discussions on readings, and guest speakers.

Throughout the session students will engage in weekly research tasks and discuss their progress in studio with peers and studio leaders. Progress will also be documented and shared online and in studio.

This subject aligns with activities in 87933 Critical Practice: Exploration and 87931 Researching: Contexts, providing insights material practices and processes to support students’ development of professional work practices and outcomes.

Content (topics)

The students work in a small group with a community client defining the project brief and attempting to fulfil the project aims to the client's satisfaction. Teamwork, client liaison, the ability to understand and rationalise complex issues, and culturally diversity, research, professional design skills and presentation are all part of this rich engagement. The groups will be expected to engage in-group or individual tasks in a professional way advised by a supervising team leader.

In 2017 students are working from a live design brief in response to the needs of a community and culturally based organisation as their client. This subject allows students to immerse themselves within the Indigenous culture and develop a strong understanding of the Principles and Protocols for working with Indigenous people and communities.

Students research the areas of Indigenous symbolic language and identity construction as a method to both interrogate and creatively respond to the design outcome.

Students will also need to source and pin examples of secondary research in the Pinterest board on UTSOnline, as described in the Workshop PDFs.

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Understanding Indigenous Protocols: Reflective Journal and Summary

Intent:

This assessment task raises the awareness of identity, culture, language (the languages Indigenous peoples use, and the language we need to use around Indigenous people), culturally safe spaces, and enduring living heritage. Students will actively take part in two Yarning Circles, engaging with Indigenous protocols, write their personal thoughts on the upcoming Broome experience, visit Lustre: Pearling and Australia exhibition at Australian Maritime Museum, respond to Yawuru material and Watchings and Listenings, experience on the field trip to Broome and develop an individual learning goals that will guide and direct their learning experience and expectations.

Task 1: Reflective Journal and Report

This assessment task is a reflection and analysis of your experience during this subject. For the initial four components, students will share in class in week 2 and 3 the following experiences as well as reflection on Lustre exhibition, the Watchings and Listenings that are provided, the Yawuru material and the articulation of individual learning. At the end of semester, students will hand in a short summary of their overall experience in this subject and what they have learnt; this can include text, images, drawing, photographs, video, taken from their reflective journal.

1. Your Thoughts:
Write your thought about how you see the Broome experience, the challenges, expectations and what would you like to achieve.
– What do you think the challenges will be?
– What are you most looking forward to?
– What is your experience with Indigenous people?

– What do you think it will be like working on this project with Indigenous people?

Use these questions as a guide, rather than as a point-by-point question and answer. It’s important to be honest with your response as this will help to generate a more thoughtful discussion around the experience and working with Indigenous communities.

2. Yarning and Stringing Circle – Week 2
Gentle cultural awareness through a Yarning Circle which will discuss topics to do with identity, culture, language, culturally safe space, and enduring living Indigenous heritage

3. Taking Responsibility: directing learning – Week 3
The learning outcomes for this subject will be assessed through particular criteria that will guide and direct your learning experience and expectations. In addition we would like to establish a conversation about individual student concerns for professional and academic focus. Students will be asked to consider areas of learning that they would like to develop. The first two are already a given and you are required to create three more to complete the list.

1. Research = cultural competency

2. Demonstrate sophisticated skills in translating cultural requirements in the design outcome.

Each student will suggest three others based on the subject learning objectives and the things you would like to emphasise in your learning. These will be used to contribute to your feedback.

4. Yarning Circle – Week 3
Open conversation to discuss the School of Design’s Principles and Protocols of working with Indigenous people and designers, which also discuss the misappropriation of imagery, culture and art.

Further Information: Hand in a copy of your “Your Thoughts”, and “Taking Responsibility: directing learning week 3, and upload to UTSOnline (TBC)

Final Reflective Report due on June 26 (TBC)

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1 and 2

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

.3 and .3

Type: Reflection
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 20%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Reflect on experiences and demonstrate an understanding of Indigenous protocols and principles. 50 1 .3
Well presented written summary and reflective journal with properly referenced sources including images. 50 2 .3
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Broome presentation

Intent:

This assessment task has three components. First to analyse and understand the cultural appropriation of both tangible and intangible Indigenous heritage. The second component has two visual research approaches, with the aim to gain an understanding of Indigenous symbolic language and identity construction from both a visual arts and a design perspective.

The outcomes and knowledge gained from the first two components will inform the Broome Presentation which is the final component and will be used to create an engaging and informative visual story to be presented to Yawuru community.

Task:

This assessment task has four components:

A. Cultural Appropriation: (Individual assessment)
You are required to read two papers around the topic of cultural appropriation and tangible and intangible Indigenous heritage. Additionally, you are to investigate the Indigenous Materials referencing system developed in collaboration with Danièle Hromek and the UTS library with the aim of coming to an understanding of some of the concerns Indigenous people face in relation to the discipline of Design, and how designers can work respectfully with Indigenous people.

Design Response: a written and visual response relating to the topics explored in part A

B. Exploring Indigenous Artworks: (Individual assessment)

You will participate in a curated tour of the Indigenous artworks and artifacts within the Australian Museum. On your own or within your group you will need to explore similar exhibitions at the Art Gallery of NSW. From these explorations you will pick three (3) artists/works/artifacts (it’s not necessary to have all three within the same category), and research these tangible artworks, answering the following questions, ensuring you reference appropriately in accordance with the Indigenous Materials referencing system. Feel free to add additional information that you have uncovered.

• What is the artwork? (i.e. painting, sculpture, artifact, object, garment)

• Who made it? (i.e. name, birth, death, relationship around that person and why was it created)

• Where was it made? (look into the location and consider the language group the artist was associated with)

• What context was it made in? (expand on the background story of the artwork)

• Are there any linking visual elements between the three artworks?

• Size/Dimensions

• Material

Design Response: will include research information and insights which inform this exploration and can be produced in a digital or print format of your choice.

C. Understanding Indigenous symbolic visual identity language: (group assessment)
This research exploring how Indigenous identities and motifs are represented across a variety of brand logos. As a group you will collect a database of logos that use Indigenous motifs and will categories according to a classifications system. Each logo requires the inclusion of either an Indigenous motif, or a logo that represents an Indigenous organization, community group, other Indigenous associated groups. Additionally, logos that may not have any Indigenous connect however have appropriated the motifs.

This research can be localised, or encompass a wider scope, yet this should be clearly represented in the categorization process.

Use primary and secondary research techniques to find these logos. While the internet is a great source, consider researching within in your everyday environment and within Indigenous community environments.

Design Response (Group project): Presentation of final categorized database of logos should be visual represented in a format that offers engagement, but also can be displayed in Broome for viewing by various stakeholders. This might be that there are more than one way to present the material.

D. Broome Presentation
The outcomes and knowledge gained from the previous tasks will inform the Broome presentation which is an opportunity to introduce yourselves to the Broome community, demonstrate your research and open the discussion when we arrive in Broome. This can be created through digital presentation and/or printed presentation, or a combination of both. This will be dictated by the information collected, and through group discussion.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 5, 6 and 7

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

.3, .3, R.1 and R.2

Type: Project
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 30%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Critically analyse a project brief, in order to clarify project parameters and develop a project management plan. 25 6 R.2
Ability to argue for the value of one’s own practice-oriented research through considered documentation and annotation 25 5 R.1
Ability to confidently share understandings of Indigenous protocols and principles and how they may be implemented in innovative ways into practice. 25 1 .3
Thoughtfully and skillfully present research, process work and design propositions in visual, oral and written forms ensuring considered attribution and referencing. 25 7 .3
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 3: Yawuru Brand Identity Redesign

Intent:

Yawuru is an Indigenous organization located in Broome. They have a number of different logos and brands that need to be rationalized, modernized and made more relevant and meaningful to represent the different aspects of the organization. Yawuru also wants to make sure that its brand is immediately recognized within the public sphere without losing its connections to community and its strong representation of land, people and culture.

There will be a week long “on country” immersive experience in Broome to offer students insights on the Yawuru people and wider community and will contribute towards their responsiveness towards the brand strategy.

The intended outcome is for students to develop cultural awareness, and working in complex cross-cultural situations, along with developing the overall brand and brand architecture for Yawuru and its various entities, and how they will visually link to Yawuru as the umbrella company. You will produce a style guide that outlines the protocols for how all associated logos will visually link with Yawuru, and how this identity will translate across various collateral material. Additionally, the final artworks for the redesigned Yawuru and Nyamba Buru Yawuru Ltd, logos along with concepts for how other associated logos will visually link together

Task:

Documentation of Broome experience, concept designs, pitch to client and guidelines with final logos

Weight: 50%

Due date: To be confirmed

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

3, 4, 5 and 6

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

.2, .3, P.1 and R.1

Type: Project
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 50%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Deeply engage in iterative, practice-led research processes 25 3 .2
Generate diverse and imaginative design concepts relevant to the specific requirements of a project brief 25 4 P.1
Ability to argue for the value of one’s own practice-oriented research through considered documentation and annotation 25 5 R.1
Develop a refined design project through a process of critical reflection, responding to feedback, and iterative refinement. 25 6 .3
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes