University of Technology Sydney

86005 Design Studio: Inhabitations

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2022 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: Architecture
Credit points: 12 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

In this studio, students learn core skills and knowledge in the areas of site analysis, client engagement, domestic typologies, space planning and joinery. Students incorporate these skills with the research techniques and design methods from their previous studio into cohesive design projects. Additionally, students learn to experiment in thinking and practice as a means of developing their design approach. This studio has an emphasis on well-considered and crafted, finished outcomes.

The design project constitutes the primary vehicle for learning and development throughout the Interior Architecture program. This subject comprises of lectures, and design tutorials. The lectures and tutorials unpack contemporary and historical case studies and theoretical frameworks concerning domestic typologies.

Design projects are framed within a theoretical discourse and developed within the design environment. Projects within the design tutorials build spatial intelligence and innovative approaches to design through thoughtful and rigorous individual design processes. Students work alongside studio leaders to incorporate specific knowledge for the lectures through a combination of iterative modelling, drawings, and sketch design development in a weekly 'pin-up and present' format.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. To develop formal and informal experimentation methods.
2. To engage with ideas of event, programme and spatial organisation.
3. To develop and evolve individual design intuition and spatial creativity.
4. To develop and employ a rigorous iterative method-based design process.
5. To engage in the realisation and presentation of design concepts across four dimensions.
6. To establish and employ critical reflective techniques.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes:

  • Ability to take autonomous responsibility for actions and decisions (A.1)
  • Ability to work cooperatively as part of a team, initiate partnerships with others, take a leadership role when required and constructively contribute to peer learning and critique (C.1)
  • Ability to communicate ideas effectively, including oral, written, visual, analogue and digital presentations (2D and 3D) (C.2)
  • Ability to understand and generate design propositions across a diverse range of design scenarios and negotiate final propositions with multiple stakeholders (I.2)
  • Ability to initiate and execute meaningful self-directed iterative processes (I.3)
  • Ability to apply and utilise appropriate communication techniques, knowledge and understanding to enable practical applications in spatial design (P.1)
  • Ability to rigorously explore, apply and extend multiple representational techniques (P.2)
  • Ability to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of interior and spatial design precedent and to contextualise one's work within the extended discipline (R.3)
  • Ability to reflect on, challenge and interrogate theoretical speculation (R.4)

Teaching and learning strategies

The lectures of the subject are episodic instances in a larger continuous narrative. Students, therefore, are to review the previous week's lecture notes before each lecture.

This subject is studio-based. Design tutorials are an intense, fast-paced and highly interactive learning format. It is taught collaboratively by practising design professionals and UTS academics. In each tutorial session, students receive formative feedback and reflection from studio leaders and peers while continuing to work iteratively towards the final design project through a variety of formats both within and outside tutorial times. This includes audio and video works, diagrams, plans and drawings, models and reflective writing.

This subject includes active, interactive and collaborative learning experiences through lectures and design tutorials. It uses an inquiry-based learning strategy that involves students in researching and developing their own/group solutions to complex problems and scenarios. Further, this subject incorporates a range of teaching and learning strategies which includes lectures, discussions, demonstrations, studio activities, design thinking/making and student presentations. Each class is complemented by reading, research and reflection on studio work, individual and collaborative group tasks.

Lectures and tutorials will incorporate a range of teaching and learning strategies including studio work, short presentations, videos, simulations, discussion of readings, case studies and student group work. These will be complemented by independent student reading and participation in online and in studio discussion. Students should document their work process, visual and written research and design development of their design project.

Content (topics)

This subject addresses the following issues and topics:

  • Iterative and generative design processes
  • Spatial design experimentation
  • Exploration of inhabitation and spatial organization
  • Theoretical rigor

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Preliminary Design

Intent:

Overview: Preliminary design proposal

Aims: To develop a detailed understanding of the site and client through models, research and drawings. To develop a preliminary design response based on your understanding of site and client through models and drawings.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 4, 5 and 6

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.1, C.1, I.2, P.2 and R.3

Type: Project
Groupwork: Group, individually assessed
Weight: 40%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Design Presentation + Concept 10 5 I.2
Design drawing + Models 30 6 P.2
Research + Analysis 30 1 R.3
Collaboration + Teamwork 10 2 C.1
Iteration + Process + Documentation 20 4 A.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Final Design

Intent:

Overview: Final design proposal

Aims: To develop a detailed spatial design and joinery strategy that responds to the site and client based on your preliminary design proposal.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 3, 4 and 5

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.1, C.2, I.2, I.3 and P.1

Type: Project
Groupwork: Group, individually assessed
Weight: 40%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Presentation + Concept 15 5 I.2
Design drawing + Models 30 4 P.1
Designed joinery solutions 30 1 I.3
Collaboration + Teamwork 5 2 C.2
Iteration + Process + Documentation 20 3 A.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 3: Design Analysis

Intent:

Overview: Design Research and Analysis

Aims: To develop a detailed spatial design research report based on the design histories and theories addressed in the lecture series. To be presented in written format.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

3 and 6

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

C.2 and R.4

Type: Report
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 20%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Comprehension and insight of theory 70 3 R.4
Detailed presentation of knowledge 30 6 C.2
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Minimum requirements

  1. The Faculty of DAB expects students to attend 80% of all classes for all enrolled subjects. Achievement of the subject’s aims is difficult if classes are not attended. Where assessment tasks are to be presented personally, in class attendance is mandatory.
  2. Pursuant to UTS rule 2.5.1 students who do not satisfy attendance requirements may be refused permission by the Responsible Academic Officer to be considered for assessment for this subject.

Required texts

Carlin, Scott. Elizabeth Bay House: a history & guide. Sydney: Historic Houses Trust of New South Wales (2000).

Elizabeth Bay House. Sydney: Historic Houses Trust of New South Wales (1984).

Windschuttle, Elizabeth. Taste and Science: the women of the Macleay family, 1790-1850. Sydney: Historic Houses Trust of New South Wales (1988).

Jones, Shar.; Otto, Kristin. Identifying Australian Houses. Sydney: Historic Houses Trust of New South Wales (1981).

Jones, Shar.; Otto, Kristin. Colonial food & drink, 1788-1901. Sydney: Historic Houses Trust of New South Wales (1988).

Recommended texts

Colquhoun, Alan. Modern Architecture. London: Oxford, 2002. (Ch. 7 & 8).

Harvey, David. “The urban process under capitalism: A framework for analysis.” International Journal of Urban and Regional Research 6, no. 1, (1977). P. 24-33.

Evans, Robin. “Rookeries and Model Dwellings: English Housing Reform and the Moralities of Private Space,” in Translations from Drawing to Building and Other Essays, 93-117. London: Architectural Association, 1997.

Rossi, Aldo. The Architecture of the City. Cambridge: The MIT Press, 1982. (Ch. 1).

Hill, Jonathan. Immaterial architecture. New York: Routledge, 2006. (Ch. 1).

Klahr, Douglas M. “Luxury Apartments with a Tenement Heart: The Kurfürstendamm and the Berliner Zimmer.” Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 70, no.3 (2011): 290-307.

Bechthold, Tim and Julia Reischl. “Kitchen stories: Cuisine Atelier Le Corbusier, type 1.” Contributions to the Vienna Congress 2012 57, no.1 (2012): 27-35.

Jerram, Leif. “Kitchen sink dramas: women, modernity and space in Weimar Germany.” Cultural Geographies 13 (2006): 538 – 556.

Campagnoli, Maëlle. “Cuisine, cooking, kitchens.” Accessed July 1, 2018. https://www.ekokook.com/look-at-ekokook.html.

King, Anthony. The bungalow: the production of a global culture. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995.

Butler, Graeme. The Californian Bungalow in Australia. Victoria: Lothian Books, 1997.

Rybczynski, Witold. Home: a short history of an idea. Middlesex: Penguin Books Ltd., 1986. (Ch. 2 and 3).

Rybczynski, Witold. Looking Around: A Journey Through Architecture. London: Penguin Books, 1993.

Zeinstra, Jurjen, ed. Amsterdam Places: Interiors, Buildings and Cities. Amsterdam: Architectura & Natura, 2013.

Victorian House Designs in Authentic Full Color: 75 Plates from the "Scientific American -- Architects and Builders Edition," 1885-1894. New York: Dover Architecture, 1997.

Howells, Trevor, and Colleen Morris. Terrace Houses in Australia. Sydney: Lansdowne Publishing Pty Ltd, 1999.

Stapleton, Maisy, and Ian Stapleton. Australian House Styles. Mullumbimby: The Flannel Flower Press Pty Ltd, 2003.

Gaut, Helen Lukens. “1916 Rustic Bungalow.” Journal Bungalows, The Ladies Home Journal, 1916.

Howard, Ebenezer. To-morrow: A Peaceful Path to Real Reform. London: Swan Sonnenschein & Co., Ltd., 1898.

Roberts, Henry. The dwellings of the labouring classes, their arrangement and construction : with the essentials of a health dwelling : illustrated by references to the model houses of the Society for Improving the Condition of the Labouring Classes : with plans and elevations of dwellings adapted to towns and to rural districts. London: Society for Improving the Condition of the Labouring Classes, 1867.

Getty Trust. “Our Lord in the Attic: A Case Study.” Accessed July 1, 2017. https://www.getty.edu/conservation/publications_resources/teaching/case/olita/building/construction_building.html

Lerup, Lars. Planned Assaults. Cambridge: The MIT Press, on behalf of CCA, 1987.

Kuroishi, Izumi. “Visual Examinations of Interior Space in Movements to Modernize Housing in Japan, c. 1920-40.” Interiors 2 (2011): 95- 124.