University of Technology Sydney

84712 Product Engineering

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2021 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: Design
Credit points: 12 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

Requisite(s): 84117 Product Design Communication B

Description

An understanding of manufacturing and industry knowledge in connection with structure, materials and processes must be applied in the design and development of new products. This subject introduces students to a range of structural and manufacturing principles as they relate to integrated product designs, including (where appropriate) mechanics and electronics. Through a series of projects, design-thinking supports the exploration of technical approaches to the functional aspects of future-orientated products, systems and interfaces, both conceptually and in the establishment of efficient physical forms. Aptitude in the ability to innovate, experiment and rationalise solution concepts that appropriately consider these technical aspects is developed through the practise of design skills, including sketching, prototyping and collaboration to produce designs that are ecologically responsible, technically feasible and operationally intuitive for the end-user.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. Establish the fundamental knowledge of manufacturing and engineering as it applies to integrated product design.
2. Apply engineering drafting standards relevant to product manufacture.
3. Communicate design attributes through iterative design development.
4. Justify and articulate the links between concept, design, manufacture and commercialisation.
5. Present design work to a professional standard.
6. Integrate engineering elements into an original design aesthetic.
7. Utilise 3D printing as a way to verify CAD data, confirm production details and communicate design intent.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes:

  • Demonstrated engagement with ideas and learning (A.1)
  • Value for alternative points of view (A.3)
  • Value for richly diverse and sustainable human cultures and environmental ecologies (A.4)
  • Effective written and oral communication skills (C.1)
  • Effective visual communication skills (C.2)
  • Effective tangible 3D representation (C.3)
  • Demonstration of versatility, curiosity and imagination (I.2)
  • Demonstration of aesthetic sensibility (I.3)
  • Ability to propose, develop and rethink ideas (I.4)
  • Industry specific practical and digital skills (P.1)
  • Accuracy, rigour and care (P.2)
  • Ability to self-manage, including task initiation, allocation of time and realisation of outcomes (P.3)
  • Identify and execute research methods appropriate to the project (R.1)
  • Analyse complex contexts for design (R.2)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

The term CAPRI is used for the five Design, Architecture and Building faculty graduate attribute categories where:

C = communication and groupwork

A = attitudes and values

P = practical and professional

R = research and critique

I = innovation and creativity.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs) are linked to these categories using codes (e.g. C-1, A-3, P-4, etc.).

Teaching and learning strategies

This subject uses the problem based learning strategy that involves students in researching and developing their own solutions to complex design challenges. The subject uses design professionals as studio leaders to ensure that all content and tasks are relevant to current professional practice in a global context.

This subject includes active and collaborative learning experiences where ongoing feedback is provided weekly in all on campus engagements such as, studios and CAD labs. It is therefore imperative that students prepare for and attend all on campus engagements according to the Program.

Pre-recorded lectures will provide knowledge relevant to the subject that will enable students to work on their design projects. The knowledge provided is information on the principles of manufacturing, materials and basic engineering as core elements of integrated product design practice. Prior to each studio students will be required to review a pre-recorded lecture online and prepare questions for the studio leader relating to the weekly lecture content and the design projects they are working on. The weekly lecture is listed in the Program and all pre-recorded lectures are available on UTSOnlline.

In the studios students will work on their design projects with a studio leader. At the beginning of each studio the studio leader will discuss with the entire group the challenges they are facing with their projects. The studio leader will then prompt students faced by similar challenges to form small groups to facilitate collaborative discussions. The studio leader will be reviewing the work weekly and will provide feedback verbally. It will be the students responsibly to record any feedback provided in studio. During pin-up presentations students will be expected to actively participate in collaborative peer review feedback exercises.

The CAD computer labs are provided to support students in the development of their designs for discussion in studio. Prior to each CAD computer lab students will be required to prepare questions for the studio leader in relation to the design projects they are working on.

Students will also be supported by the level 2, Faculty Workshop in the construction of presentation models and prototypes.

Grades, marks and feedback on final design submissions will be provided through Review.

Content (topics)

  • Manufacturing and material technologies
  • Structure in component design
  • Production geometry
  • Assembly methods in manufacturing
  • Industrial design process
  • Free-hand sketching and drawing
  • 3D Printing and modelling
  • Engineering drawing
  • Computer aided design and rendering
  • Branding and strategy

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Consumer Product

Intent:

This task is assessed by your Tuesday studio leaders.

Please note:

The Studio is to be understood as a professional working environment, make sure you are on time and stay for the duration. We will not tolerate any distracting apps such as gaming, social media, etc. running in the background, so leave your laptops in your bag.

We will not review or give feedback on any work shown to us on a screen, such as a smartphone, tablet or computer. All 2D work must be shown to us in printed hard copy, on paper and this includes photos and CAD renderings. We must do it this way so we can physically sketch over the work we are reviewing and discuss design details with you.

We will not review or give feedback on photos of models. All 3D objects such as foam models and sketch models must be physically brought to studio. We must do it this way so we can physically feel and interact with the form and discuss design details with you.

If you fail to bring in 2D hardcopies or actual models your work will not be signed off and will therefore, not be marked as completed for that week. So, make sure you plan ahead and prepare your work before you come to studio.

Overview

A design project to develop and assess the students' understanding of how to create parts and assemblies for manufacture that also meet a commercial requirement - specifically the attributes of a brand that mesh with the necessary aesthetic, ergonomic and operational parameters of the design.

Aim

To develop an original hand-held consumer product for a particular brand.

Parameters

You will be assigned either a Hand-Held Mixer for DeWalt or a Jigsaw for Dyson as your main design project. The challenge is to design a product for a brand that is looking to compete in a market that is new to them. You will be required to research, design and detail a design solution that will include; a high-quality foam model, visual boards, engineering drawings and a verbal presentation. You will be required to consider carefully the design of components in terms of production feasibility, brand aesthetics, housings for internal parts, overall form for ergonomic appropriateness and general attention to issues of ecological sustainability.

Deliverables

These items are due at various stages of the project:

Part 1 Concept Due Week 6, Tuesday 14.04.20, at the beginning of studio.

For this submission you must produce:

1. A high-quality, 1:1 Foam Model with a smooth and accurate finish (not painted!) to evaluate the final form in terms of general appearance and ergonomic appropriateness.

2. A high-quality 1:1 Scale Layout Drawing showing Front, Top and Side views plus the three overall dimensions. This drawing should be created using 2D software such as Adobe Illustrator. Drawing must black and white, different line weights and grey shading is encouraged. Page size will likely to be A2.

3. A high-quality Concept Rendering in colour. Page size; minimum A3.

Please note: Leading up to this submission you will develop your design iteratively by producing a series of foam models and concept renderings to test your design. You must consider this iterative development of the foam model and concept drawing as a process rather than a one-off event.

Part 2 Final Design Due Week 12, Tuesday 02.06.20, at the beginning of studio.

For this submission you must produce and present:

1. Two Presentation Boards formatted in accordance with guidelines (see below). Using your CAD model as the foundation, generate a professional presentation of your final design using rendering programs such as KeyShot assisted by Photoshop and Illustrator for visual adjustments and the application of annotations, logos, etc. The presentation is intended to explain the key features of your new design and generate enthusiasm for the new direction for your brand. Don't forget to add hands to your renderings to demonstrate user interaction and show reference to scale.

Guideline for Presentation Boards:

· Each panel is to be formatted A2 landscape. Print onto minimum 200gsm matt paper, not gloss. Do not mount onto foamcore.

· A template will be made available for download from UTS Online. The first board should promote the design in a similar way to a catalogue cover, and the second panel must clearly explain the key features and innovations.

· There must be a demonstrated understanding of design for manufacture evident in the second board via a rendered exploded view.

2. General Assembly (GA) Drawing. The assembled product must be represented in a GA prepared to AS1100 standard convention. The drawing must be developed in Solidworks based off an accurate CAD model. The GA must represent the placement of internal parts (such as motors and cabling). Hardcopies (folded to A4 correctly) are required. There must be a demonstrated understanding of design for manufacture evident in the GA made explicit through enlarged details and sectional views.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 4, 5 and 6

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.1, C.1, C.2, C.3, P.1 and P.2

Type: Project
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 50%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Part 1: Degree of quality and accuracy demonstrated in your Foam Model 12 6 C.3
Part 1: Degree of accuracy demonstrated in your 1:1 scale Layout Drawing 12 2 P.2
Part 1: Degree of quality and care demonstrated in your Concept Rendering 12 5 C.2
Part 2: Degree of clarity to which your Presentation Board 1 communicates the intent of your Consumer Product 16 1 A.1
Part 2: Degree of understanding of manufacturing demonstrated in your Presentation Board 2 16 4 P.1
Part 2: Degree of adhesion to AS1100 standard convention shown in your General Assembly Drawing 16 2 P.1
Part 2: Degree of clarity and professionalism demonstrated in your presentation and overall commitment to the project 16 5 C.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Iterative Design process and knowledge review

Intent:

This task is assessed by your Thursday studio leaders.

Please note:

The Studio is to be understood as a professional working environment, make sure you are on time and stay for the duration. We will not tolerate any distracting apps such as gaming, social media, etc. running in the background, so leave your laptops in your bag.

We will not review or give feedback on any work shown to us on a screen, such as a smartphone, tablet or computer. All 2D work must be shown to us in printed hard copy, on paper and this includes photos and CAD renderings. We must do it this way so we can physically sketch over the work we are reviewing and discuss design details with you.

We will not review or give feedback on photos of models. All 3D objects such as foam models and sketch models must be physically brought to studio. We must do it this way so we can physically feel and interact with the form and discuss design details with you.

If you fail to bring in 2D hardcopies or actual models your work will not be signed off and will therefore, not be marked as completed for that week. So, make sure you plan ahead and prepare your work before you come to studio.

Overview

Reporting and reflection tasks to develop the students' ability to design iteratively and to assess manufacturing and basic engineering knowledge as an integral part of industrial design practice.

Aim

To design a product iteratively, to present a product design at various stages of its development, to demonstrate knowledge gained from interactive lecture sessions.

Deliverables

These items are due at various stages of the project:

Part 1 Iterative Design Development and In-Studio Participation Assessed every week, from week 1 to 12.

In this studio you must present, every week, the iterative progress you are making with all aspects of your Consumer Product. You must present the work you have completed in your Tuesday studio. Your Thursday studio leader will review the work you are presenting each week and provide verbal feedback on all aspects of your project. It is important for you to understand that in order to pass this assessment you must attend all three weekly studios (Tuesday, Thursday and Friday) and complete all in-studio exercises.

For example, during the Tuesday studio you may be required to complete a number of pages of free hand concept sketches. At the end of the Tuesday studio your studio leader will then sign and date all of your drawings. You are then to bring all signed and dated drawings to your Thursday studio for review. Failure to do so will result in you failing that week's assessment.

For this assessment task you must:

1. Attend all Tuesday studios and complete all Tuesday in-studio exercises and/or homework.

2. Attend all Thursday studios and present your design iterations.

3. Attend all Friday CAD labs and complete all CAD exercises and/or homework.

Please note: If you are unable to attend, for example due to illness, you must have a supporting doctor’s certificate or other relevant document that substantiates your reason for being absent.

Part 2 Knowledge Review Week 12, Thursday 04.06.20

Multiple choice exam using IF-AT (Immediate Feedback Assessment Technique) cards and completed in the first one hour of studio. This is an open-book exam and questions will be drawn from material delivered in the lecture series.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 3, 4, 5 and 6

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.1, A.3, A.4, C.2, I.2, I.3, I.4, R.1 and R.2

Type: Reflection
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 30%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Part 1, Week 1: Iterative Design Development and in-studio participation 7 3 A.1
Part 1, Week 2: Iterative Design Development and in-studio participation 7 4 A.3
Part 1, Week 3: Iterative Design Development and in-studio participation 7 5 I.2
Part 1, Week 4: Iterative Design Development and in-studio participation 7 6 R.2
Part 1, Week 5: Iterative Design Development and in-studio participation 7 3 C.2
Part 1, Week 6: Iterative Design Development and in-studio participation 7 4 I.4
Part 1, Week 7: Iterative Design Development and in-studio participation 7 5 I.3
Part 1, Week 8: Iterative Design Development and in-studio participation 7 6 R.1
Part 1, Week 9: Iterative Design Development and in-studio participation 8 3 I.4
Part 1, Week 10: Iterative Design Development and in-studio participation 8 4 I.2
Part 1, Week 11: Iterative Design Development and in-studio participation 8 5 A.4
Part 2, Knowledge Review 20 1 A.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 3: Structure and basic manufacturing in product design

Intent:

This task is assessed by your Friday CAD lab leader.

Please note:

The CAD Lab is to be understood as a professional working environment. Make sure you are on time and stay for the duration. We also will not tolerate any distracting apps such as gaming, social media, etc. running in the background on either the Lab desktops computers or personal laptops.

Overview

A design project to develop and assess the students' understanding of structure and basic manufacturing principles as an integrated part of product design process through digital modelling and production methods such as CAD and 3D printing.

Aim

To develop a digital CAD version of the Consumer Product (Assessment task 1) and to physically verify part geometry through 3D printing.

Deliverables

These items are due at various stages of the project:

Part 1 Build a CAD file of an existing component Due week 5, Thursday 09.04.20 (12am midnight) uploaded to UTSOnline.

For this submission you must produce: A CAD model of an injection moulded or die cast component. You are to physically disassemble an existing consumer product and select a component with complex geometry. Before you commence CAD modelling you must verify that your chosen component is suitable for this task with your studio leader.

Submit your physical component the following week 6, Friday 17.04.20

Part 2

SolidWorks assembly of your Consumer Product Due week 11, Friday 29.05.20, (12am midnight) uploaded to UTSOnline.

For this submission you must produce: A zipped folder containing the Solidworks assembly file of your consumer product, all individual part files and any referenced source/multibody part files.

Part 3 One 3D printed component of your Consumer Product Due Friday19.06.20, in box outside office CB06.06.053 (Berto’s office).

For this submission you must produce: A physical 3D print of one of the major components from your Consumer Product.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2 and 7

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

C.3, P.3 and R.2

Type: Project
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 20%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Part 1: Ability to demonstrate self directed learning in the accurate translation of an existing physical part to a CAD model. 25 2 P.3
Part 2: Demonstrate accuracy and rigour and care in the generation of a complete product assembly evident in the CAD model of you Consumer Product. 50 1 R.2
Part 3: Effective 3D printed component from your consumer product. 25 7 C.3
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Minimum requirements

The DAB attendance policy requires students to attend no less than 80% of formal teaching sessions (lectures and tutorials) for each class they are enrolled in to remain eligible for assessment.

Each project includes an assessment criteria that grades the students level of commitment and engagement in class and to the subject generally. Poor, unexplained attendance at any stage during the semester will certainly mean that the student will receive a fail grade for this criteria, significantly affecting their overall subject grade.

Required texts

Thompson, R. 2007, Manufacturing Processes for Design Professionals, Thames & Hudson, London

Recommended texts

Kuprenas, J. and Frederick, M. 2013, 101 Things I Learned in Engineering School, Grand Central Publishing, NY
Malloy, R. A. 2011, Plastic Part Design for Injection Moulding: An Introduction, 2nd. Ed., Hanser, München
Ivanoff, V., 1998. Mechanical engineering science, an introduction. Sydney: Mc Graw Hill.
Norman, E., Cubitt, J., Urry, S. & Whttaker, M., 2000. Advanced Design and Technology 3rd Ed. London: Longman.
Wyatt, K., J., 2002. Principles of Structure, revised ed., UNSW Press.
Lefteri, C., 2007. Making it: Manufacturing techniques for product design. London: Laurence King.
Ashby, M. & Johnson, K., 2002. Materials and Design: The Art and Science of Material Selection in Product design.
Burlington MA: Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann.
Lesko, J., 2008. Materials and Manufacturing guide – Industrial Design 2nd Ed. John Wiley and sons.
Williams, R.A., 1993. Engineering drawing handbook. Sydney: Standards Australia.
Shigley, J.E., Mischke, C.R., 1996. Standard Handbook of Machine Design 2nd Ed. Mc Graw Hill.
Oberg, E., Jones, F.D., Horton, H.L. & Ryfell, H.H., 2000. Machinery’s Handbook 26th Ed. Industrial Press.
Olofsson, E. & Sjolen, K., 2005. Design Sketching 2nd Ed. Sweden: KEEOS Design Books AB.