University of Technology Sydney

84711 User-centred Design

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2021 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: Design
Credit points: 12 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

Requisite(s): 84610 Inside Design AND 84111 Understanding Three-dimensional Form AND 84116 Product Design Communication A AND 84611 Integrated Product Design AND 84117 Product Design Communication B AND 84118 Informing Product Design

Description

User-centred design involves the selective application of research and design methods focused on understanding the needs and limitations of the end-user in the development of new products, interfaces and systems solutions. The development of designs of optimum useability and performance involves the analysis of users, their environment and circumstance through the methodological application of interventions, testing methods and experimentation supported by literature and empirical research.

The subject aims to support students in creative exploration, analysis and reflection of the problem space and solution concepts through design thinking reliant on the use of prototyping skills in the pursuit of innovative solutions that meet both ergonomic (the application of scientific information about human capabilities and limitations) and commercial goals.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. Demonstrate a capacity to access, compile and interpret relevant ergonomics and anthropometric data.
2. Demonstrate a capacity to apply design methods and generate process in the development of integrated product designs.
3. Demonstrate an understanding of product design in a systems context taking into account cognitive, social and behavioural human factors
4. Demonstrate a capacity to test designs through modelling
5. Demonstrate a capacity to report on design progress through drawings and sketches
6. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of structure, form and material
7. Demonstrate a capacity to produce professional communication of design outcomes including production drawings

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes:

  • Demonstrated engagement with ideas and learning (A.1)
  • Commitment to ethical practices (A.2)
  • Value for richly diverse and sustainable human cultures and environmental ecologies (A.4)
  • Effective tangible 3D representation (C.3)
  • Demonstration of versatility, curiosity and imagination (I.2)
  • Industry specific practical and digital skills (P.1)
  • Ability to self-manage, including task initiation, allocation of time and realisation of outcomes (P.3)
  • Identify and execute research methods appropriate to the project (R.1)
  • Analyse complex contexts for design (R.2)
  • Develop reasoned arguments supported by research (R.3)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

The term CAPRI is used for the five Design, Architecture and Building faculty graduate attribute categories where:

C = communication and groupwork

A = attitudes and values

P = practical and professional

R = research and critique

I = innovation and creativity.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs) are linked to these categories using codes (e.g. C-1, A-3, P-4, etc.).

Teaching and learning strategies

This subject uses an inquiry-based learning strategy that involves students in researching and developing their own solutions to complex design challenges. The subject uses design professionals as mentors and guest lecturers to ensure that all content and tasks are relevant to current professional practice in a global context. This subject includes active learning experiences where ongoing feedback is provided weekly in all on campus engagements such as interactive lecture sessions, studios and CAD computer labs. It is therefore imperative that students attend all on campus engagements. The subject combines one 1 hour online lecture, two 2 hour studios and one 2 hour CAD computer lab, per week. The interactive lecture sessions will provide knowledge, relevant to the subject, and that will enable students to work on their design projects. The knowledge provided includes information on the principles of ergonomics, anthropometry and design methods to be used in the development of human centred designs. Prior to key lectures, students will be required to prepare questions or complete tasks for the lecturer relating to the weekly lecture content, and the design projects they are working on. Students will be able to do this by reviewing reference material relevant to each interactive lecture session. The weekly lecture topic and where to find reference materials is listed in the Program. In the studio's, students will work on their design projects with a mentor. At the beginning of each studio the mentor will discuss with the entire group the challenges they are facing with their projects. The mentor will then prompt students faced by similar challenges to form small groups to facilitate collaborative discussions. The mentor will be reviewing the work weekly and will provide feedback verbally.

It shall be the students responsibility to record any feedback provided in studio. During pin-up presentations students will be expected to actively participate in collaborative peer review feedback exercises. The CAD computer workshops are provided to support students in the development of their designs for discussion, and later, presentation in studio. Prior to each CAD computer workshop students will be required to prepare questions for the mentor in relation to the design projects they are working on. Students will also be supported by the level 2, Faculty Workshop in the construction of presentation models and prototypes. Grades, marks and feedback on final design submissions will be provided through Re.View.

Content (topics)

This subject addresses the following issues and topics:

  • Introduction to ergonomics and anthropometrics
  • Introduction to design methods for gathering and interpreting information for design development purposes
  • Understanding products in a systems context
  • Examining human interface with products
  • Investigation of human physical needs with regard to age, gender, disability, diversity etc.
  • Proposing appropriate materials, manufacturing and embedded technologies
  • Creation of models, prototypes, engineering drawings and diagrams
  • Development of digital reports and process journals

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Product Design

Intent:

A design project to assess and develop the students understanding of the incorporation of behavioural human factors and research methods into the design process, for designs that are engineered for the human body, identified through the creation of new experiences that respond to cultural and technological future trends.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 3, 4, 5 and 7

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

I.2, P.1, P.3, R.1, R.2 and R.3

Type: Project
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 50%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Part 1: Synthesis of ergonomic and anthropometric knowledge evident in the compiling and interpreting of data represented in your submitted work. 12 1 R.1
Part 1: Divergent thinking to rationalise innovations for cognitive and behavioural human factors in both problem setting and problem solving evident in your submitted work. 12 4 R.2
Part 1: Demonstrated commitment to the project evident in studio participation and work ethic with regard to the use of methods and dedication to process. 12 3 R.3
Part 2: Demonstrated degree of innovation evident in your design outcome combined with the level of ergonomic and aesthetic refinement evident across all deliverables as a result of iterative modeling. 21 5 I.2
Part 2: Demonstration of effective and professional 3D representation evident in the design of the A2 presentation boards (including quality of CAD renderings) and the 3D representation.. 21 7 P.1
Part 2: Demonstrated commitment to the project evident in studio participation and work ethic with regard to the use of methods and dedication to process. 22 3 P.3
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Iterative Design and In-Studio Participation

Intent:

Reporting and reflecting on tasks to develop the students' ability to design iteratively and to assess manufacturing and basic ergonomic knowledge as an integral part of industrial design practice.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 3 and 5

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.1, A.2, A.4 and P.3

Type: Project
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 30%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Part 1, Week 1: Iterative Design: Development and in-studio participation 3 2 A.4
Part 1, Week 2: Iterative Design: Development and in-studio participation 3 3 A.2
Part 1, Week 3: Iterative Design: Development and in-studio participation 3 5 A.1
Part 1, Week 4: Iterative Design: Development and in-studio participation 3 2 A.4
Part 1, Week 5: Iterative Design: Development and in-studio participation 3 3 A.1
Part 1, Week 6: Iterative Design: Development and in-studio participation 3 5 A.2
Part 1, Week 7: Iterative Design: Development and in-studio participation 3 2 A.4
Part 1, Week 8: Iterative Design: Development and in-studio participation 3 3 A.1
Part 1, Week 10: Iterative Design: Development and in-studio participation 3 5 A.2
Part 1, Week 11: Iterative Design: Development and in-studio participation 3 2 A.4
Part 2, Week 11: Drawing Set 50 3 A.1
Part 3. Week 12: Knowledge Review 20 1 P.3
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 3: CAD

Intent:

To develop an understanding of surfacing using SolidWorks and extend existing knowledge of CAD modelling through the development of a design project.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

3 and 4

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

C.3 and P.1

Type: Laboratory/practical
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 20%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Part 1: CAD Surfacing exercises 50 3 P.1
Part 2: Individual Project Model 50 4 C.3
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Minimum requirements

The DAB attendance policy requires students to attend no less than 80% of formal teaching sessions (lectures and tutorials) for each class they are enrolled in to remain eligible for assessment.

Required texts

Tilley, A. 2002, The Measure of Man and Woman : Human Factors in Design, Rev. edn, John Wiley and Sons, NY

Recommended texts

Böhm, F. 2005, KGID: Konstantin Grcic Industrial Design, Phaidon, NY

Bridger, R. S. 2008, Introduction to Ergonomics, Taylor and Francis

Buxton, B. 2007, Sketching User Experiences - Getting the design right and the right design, Morgan Kaufmann, CA

Kumar, V. 2013, 101 Design Methods: A structured approach for driving innovation in your organisation, John Wiley & Sons, NJ

Milton, A. & Rodgers, P. 2013, Research Methods for Product Design, Laurence King Publishing, UK

Norman, D. A. 1988, The Design of Everyday Things: Revised and Expanded Edition, Basic Books (Full-text online through UTS Library: Link available through UTS Online).

Norman, D. A. 2011, Living with Complexity, MIT Press

Olofsson, E. & Sjolen, K. 2005, Design Sketching. 2nd edn, Sweden: KEEOS Design Books AB

Pheasant S., Haslegrave C.M. 2005, Bodyspace, Anthropometry, Ergonomics and the Design of Work, CRC Taylor and Francis

Sanders M.S. & McCormick E.J. 1993, Human Factors in Engineering and Design, 7th edn, McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York

Stanton N.A. et al 2005, Human Factors Methods: A Practical Guide for Engineering and Design, Ashgate

Stevenson M.G. 2003, Notes on the Principles of Ergonomics, Mike Stevenson Ergonomics, Sydney

Rodgers, Y., Sharp, H., & Preece, J., 2013, Interaction design : beyond human-computer interaction Wiley and Sons, 4th ed.

Woodson W.E., Tillman B., Tillman P. 1992, Human Factors Design Handbook, McGraw Hill Inc New York