University of Technology Sydney

68001 Advanced Physics

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Science: Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Credit points: 6 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

The aim of this coursework subject is to enhance students' understandings of physical principles and build the capacity to engage at an advanced level in several areas of contemporary significance in physics. The subject develops the theoretical background for experimental techniques such as x-ray and neutron diffraction and advanced electron microscopy and develops student skills in computational science applied to physical systems.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:

1. Understand and correctly use the relevant terminology and concepts of the topics presented
2. Apply advanced physical concepts in order to solve scientific problems
3. Analyse and explain the areas in the context of application to nanoscience nanotechnology and other areas of modern applied physics research
4. Extract, assess, and synthesise information drawn from journal publications in the field of physics

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the development of following course intended learning outcomes:

  • Apply: Develop an understanding of experimental skills in advanced analytical techniques and their application in applied physics. (1.1)
  • Analyse: Examine and combine knowledge of applied physics as well as relevant areas in materials science, chemistry and nanotechnology. (1.2)
  • Synthesise: Apply appropriate analytical and computational techniques to critically analyse and provide solutions to solve problems in complex research contexts. (1.3)
  • Synthesise: Design complex experiments to tackle real-world problems using scientific literature and practices. (2.3)
  • Apply: Demonstrate advanced writing and oral presentation skills to communicate scientific findings effectively to peers and other scientific audiences. (5.1)
  • Analyse: Establish high-quality writing skills to effectively communicate reports and other relevant documents in the workplace. (5.2)
  • Synthesise: Communicate the relevant of applied physics in society to broader non-scientific audiences. (5.3)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

The Faculty of Science has determined that our courses will aim to develop a range of attributes in students at the completion of their course of study. This subject has been designed to develop the following attributes.

Graduate Attribute 1.0: Disciplinary Knowledge

On successful completion of this course, graduates will have developed:

Knowledge of nanotechnology to demonstrate depth, breadth, application, and interrelationships of relevant discipline areas.

On successful completion of this course, graduates will be able to:

- Apply: Develop experimental skills in established and emerging nanotechnology techniques in research contexts.

- Analyse: Examine and utilise in-depth technical knowledge of nanotechnology as well as relevant areas in chemistry, physics, and materials science.

- Synthesise: Apply analytical and computational techniques to analyse and suggest solutions to solve nanotechnology problems.

Graduate Attribute 2.0: Research, inquiry, and critical thinking

On successful completion of this course, graduates will have developed:

The ability to frame hypotheses to solve problems through the application of the scientific method and experiment, and to test current nanotechnology knowledge through critical evaluation and data analysis.

On successful completion of this course, graduates will be able to:

- Apply: Analytically predict the behaviour of real-world complex systems by using physical models with underlying assumptions, and suggested demonstrations and experiments.

- Analyse: Combine information from a variety of sources and apply that knowledge to solving research problems.

- Synthesise: Tackle the challenge of real-world problems by identifying the underlying physics and critically evaluating different solutions with consideration of uncertainties arising from experimental investigations.

Graduate Attribute 5.0: Communication

On successful completion of this course, graduates will have developed:

Effective and professional communication skills for a range of scientific audiences.

On successful completion of this course, graduates will be able to:

- Apply: Prepare and deliver presentations on topics in nanotechnology and research outcomes to different audiences using a variety of media.

- Analyse: Construct a report on a research investigation, demonstrating understanding of theoretical concepts, appropriate graphical literacy, and interpretation of results.

- Synthesise: Extend professional interpersonal communication skills to peers.

Teaching and learning strategies

The subject consists of 3 modules, each comprising 12 hours of lectures designed to develop disciplinary knowledge and its application in the broad area of condensed-matter and materials physics at a level suitable for Honours students. These modules will be drawn from the research expertise in the School.

One 3-hour combined lecture/tutorial per week will be run throughout the Session. You will read material from UTSonline and other sources and/or progress ongoing investigations as directed by the lecturer before attending class. Face-to-face meetings will be used to develop answers for assessment, by discussing concepts, solution strategies, and technical knowledge; and receive immediate verbal feedback from mentor and peers. The collaborative activities will depend on the nature of the content and assessment, but could include brainstorming research questions or industry pitches, developing mathematical models, and implementing computer simulations. You are expected to continue your learning in your own time, and will have the opportunity to receive feedback from the lecturer on a draft or outline.

Content (topics)

This subject combines topics related to the microstructural analysis of materials with the necessary foundations in physics and material science. The content of this subject will cover three modules drawn from the following list. Up to12 hours of contact time will be dedicated to each module depending on student requirements.

a. Microanalysis of materials using electron microscopy: fundamental properties of electronic materials; theoretical considerations; available experimental techniques including scanning electron microscopy, cathodoluminescence microscopy and spectroscopy, electron back scattered diffraction, electron beam induced current microscopy; applicability of the techniques; experimental considerations and practical limitations

b. Transmission electron microscopy for nanostructural characterisation: theory of electron optics; physics and instrumentation of transmission electron microscopy; operating principles; specimen preparation techniques; image processing; X-ray microanalysis; applications to optoelectronic materials

c. Molecular dynamics: numerical techniques for simulating the dynamics of large and complex systems; available computational techniques including interactive optimization, ab initio and Monte Carlo; processing and visualisation of computational results

d. Synchrotron, X-ray and neutron techniques: fundamentals of crystal structure; generation and applications of synchrotron radiation, interaction of X-rays and neutrons with matter; theory of diffraction; magnetic neutron scattering; powder and single crystal techniques; Rietveld profile analysis; application in studies of material structure and dynamics

e. Electrical characterisation of optoelectronic semiconductors: electrical properties of semiconductors and devices; theoretical considerations; available experimental techniques including four-point probe, Hall effect method, photoconductivity; application of the techniques to optoelectronic semiconductors; experimental considerations and practical limitations

f. Optical modelling and its applications to nanomaterials: methods for simulating optical properties of materials; matrix manipulation; differential equation solvers, applications to nanomaterials and nanodevices.

g. Electron beam induced growth, processing and analysis of nanostructured materials: adsorption, desorption and diffusion at solid surfaces; electron interactions with gases, solids and adsorbates; electron beam induced processing: microstructure modification, etching & deposition; techniques for imaging and analysis of electron induced processes in low, high and ultra-high vacuum environments; gas-mediated thermal and ion beam induced processing.

h. Research planning. Strategies for finding and pursuing research questions.

i. Literature reviews. Strategies for finding, reading, organizing and presenting scientific literature.

j. Optical microscopy and applications: diffraction limit, depth of field and resolution, examples of advanced microscopy (confocal, fluorescence, Raman, Brillouin) & superresolution (STED, STORM).

h. Superconducting quantum circuits: measurement hardware, cavity QED, superconducting circuits, basic qubit and resonator physics, transmon qubits, dispersive coupling, microwave spectroscopy and time-domain experiments, noise and coherence processes.

i. Integrated quantum photonics based on fabrication and properties of solid-state single photon emitters and devices that serve as building blocks of photonic quantum circuits.

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Report

Intent:

The following Graduate Attributes are assessed in this task:

1. Disciplinary knowledge and its appropriate application
2. Research, enquiry and critical thinking
5. Communication

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

1, 2, 3 and 4

This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):

1.1, 1.3, 2.3 and 5.2

Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 33%
Criteria:

Are based on demonstrated attainment of the graduate attributes, especially being able to mesh diverse information and apply it to understanding the lecture material. Submissions will be judged on the ability to clearly articulate scope and context, the appropriate selection of key strategies or themes, the depth of reasoning applied, and the soundness of the conclusions.

Assessment task 2: Journal article review

Intent:

The following Graduate Attributes are assessed in this task:

1. Disciplinary knowledge and its appropriate application
5. Communication skills

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

1, 2, 3 and 4

This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):

1.1, 1.2 and 5.2

Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 33%
Criteria:

Accurate description of key goals and results of literature

Correct application of physical reasoning for interpretation

Justified critical assessment of literature

Active participation in interacting with peers

Assessment task 3: Case-study presentation

Intent:

The following Graduate Attributes are assessed in this task:

1. Disciplinary knowledge
5. Communication

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

1, 2, 3 and 4

This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):

5.1 and 5.3

Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 34%
Criteria:

Accurate description and appraisal of technology

Correct description of relevant physical processes

Scientific clarity of presentation

Active contribution to discussion

Minimum requirements

Students must obtain at least 40% of the marks available in each module in order to pass this subject. If they do not, they will be awarded an X (fail) grade regardless of the total marks obtained in the subject.

Recommended texts

Teaching resources will be drawn from a variety of sources including textbooks, the Internet and journal articles. Reading recommendations will be advised by the lecturers.