University of Technology Sydney

60907 Managing Science-based Enterprises

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2022 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Science
Credit points: 6 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

Cross-cultural management, career management of staff, management of research and development programs and projects, intellectual property management, management of creativity, and risk management are critical competencies of managers in science-based enterprises. This subject provides the essential knowledge and concepts to facilitate skill development that is appropriate for managers in science-based enterprises. Case studies of different organisational structures and cultures is discussed.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:

1. Understand theories of organizations
2. Demonstrate knowledge of theories of culture
3. Understand the importance of culture in influencing workplace behaviour
4. Be able to manage their own career and those of others
5. Understand risk management
6. Appreciate the OH&S responsibilities of managers

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

The Faculty of Science has determined that our courses will aim to develop the following attributes in students at the completion of their course of study. Each subject will contribute to the development of these attributes in ways appropriate to the subject and the stage of progression, thus not all attributes are expected to be addressed in all subjects.

Disciplinary knowledge and its appropriate application: the disciplinary knowledge in this subject is from the management science sphere and there is a focus on the appropriate application of these perspectives to case studies from science-based enterprises and institutions.

An Inquiry-oriented approach: this subject develops a deep understanding of the practice of management in science-based enterprises and institutions. Management, leadership and related practices are explored from various relevant perspectives. Skills in critical thinking and problem solving are specifically addressed.

Professional skills and their appropriate application: the principal professional skills that are further developed include a high capacity for critical thinking, soundness of judgment, and a superior level of comprehension. Skills in communication and teamwork are also addressed.

The ability to be a Lifelong Learner: specific exercises in literature searching and information retrieval enhance skills that students may have acquired as undergraduates.

Engagement with the needs of Society: greater awareness of the role of science-based industry in the global economy within a global culture is developed. Cross-cultural management is a specific topic that is explored in considerable detail. Students will gain a greater understanding of the scope of science to contribute to the community.

Communication skills: these skills are specifically developed with opportunities for communication in written, verbal and visual forms beyond the normal expectations for undergraduate students.

Initiative and innovative ability: as a postgraduate subject there is an increased expectation that students will take responsibility for their own learning. There is flexibility in negotiating the work that the students can undertake so that they can demonstrate innovation and initiative.

Teaching and learning strategies

Classes will be held on three Saturdays within the semester. The first two days will be full-day sessions and the third Saturday will be a half-day involving individual presentations. The format for the 10th and 24th March classes will be presentations on the topics discussed and then considerable time allowing students the opportunity to discuss their own experiences.

This subject gives the opportunity for students to understand themselves better as managers or potential managers in a science-based enterprise. The class sessions will offer a ‘safe environment’ where students can explore some issues relating to management, culture, career management etc.

A great deal of the learning in this subject occurs through interaction in the class sessions. It is expected that every student will do their best to contribute to discussions. Students will treat the classes as they would a work commitment. There should be a level of obligation to your fellow students and the staff members involved. Students are expected to attend every class and arrive on time. If students will be absent they are required to contact the staff member in advance to explain their absence.

Content (topics)

  • The nature of Organizations
  • Organizational culture
  • Managing workforce diversity
  • Dimensions of culture: visible and invisible
  • Values and culture
  • The global workforce: issues and challenges
  • Goal setting
  • Managing Creativity
  • Risk Management
  • OH&S responsibilities of Managers

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Assignment on Management Case Study: analysis and solutions

Weight: 40%
Length:

Word count: ca 2500 words

Criteria:

Assessment will focus on content and the clarity of the written work including evidence of research. Students are expected to include considerable discussion of management theory in the assignment.

These assessment criteria relate directly to the following graduate attributes (please refer to list above for more detailed explication):

  • Disciplinary knowledge and its appropriate application;
  • Professional skills and their appropriate application;
  • Engagement with the needs of Society;
  • The ability to be a lifelong learner;
  • Communication skills;
  • Initiative and innovative ability.

Assessment task 2: Commentary on articles

Weight: 25%
Criteria:

The evidence of background research / planning; the capacity to engage with complex issues; good written communication skills.

These assessment criteria relate directly to the following graduate attributes (please refer to list above for more detailed explication):

  • Disciplinary knowledge and its appropriate application;
  • Professional skills and their appropriate application;
  • Engagement with the needs of Society;
  • Communication skills;
  • Initiative and innovative ability.

Assessment task 3: Individual Presentation

Weight: 25%
Criteria:

The evidence of background research / planning; the capacity to engage with complex issues; good presentation skills, demonstration of a capacity to understand and discuss the issues of leadership.

These assessment criteria relate directly to the following graduate attributes (please refer to list above for more detailed explication):

  • Disciplinary knowledge and its appropriate application;
  • Professional skills and their appropriate application;
  • Engagement with the needs of Society
  • Communication skills;
  • Initiative and innovative ability.

Assessment task 4: Class participation

Weight: 10%
Criteria:

Extent to which participation shows evidence of preparation and background reading; evidence of the capacity for reflection and planning; evidence of capacity to explore complex issues; evidence of understanding of major issues.

These assessment criteria relate directly to the following graduate attributes (please refer to list above for more detailed explication):

  • Disciplinary knowledge and its appropriate application;
  • Professional skills and their appropriate application;
  • Engagement with the needs of Society;
  • The ability to be a lifelong learner;
  • Communication skills;
  • Initiative and innovative ability.

NB All submitted papers making use of published materials, should be properly referenced and with a properly completed bibliography.

Minimum requirements

All assessment items must be completed in order to achieve a passing grade in the subject.

Any assessment task worth 40% or more requires the student to gain at least 40% of the mark for that task. If 40% is not reached, an X grade fail may be awarded for the subject, irrespective of an overall mark greater than 50.

Recommended texts

S. Clegg, M. Kornberger and T. Pitsis, Managing and Organizations: An Introduction to Theory and Practice, 2nd edition, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2008.