University of Technology Sydney

49029 Environmental Policy for Energy Systems

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2022 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Engineering: Information, Systems and Modelling
Credit points: 6 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

Effective environmental policy response is needed to redress the impacts of the energy sector on the environment. This subject aims to develop an understanding of the nature and characteristics of energy–environment linkages, concepts and methods of environmental policy analysis, and technical, economic and social dimensions of environmental policies in the context of energy systems.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:

1. Describe environmental policy contexts for energy systems
2. Explain basic concepts, principles and methods for analysing impacts of environmental policy options (e.g., carbon tax, emissions trading); and
3. Analyse and critically appraise contemporary issues in environmental policy debate at national, regional and international levels.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

  • Socially Responsible: FEIT graduates identify, engage, and influence stakeholders, and apply expert judgment establishing and managing constraints, conflicts and uncertainties within a hazards and risk framework to define system requirements and interactivity. (B.1)
  • Technically Proficient: FEIT graduates apply theoretical, conceptual, software and physical tools and advanced discipline knowledge to research, evaluate and predict future performance of systems characterised by complexity. (D.1)

Teaching and learning strategies

This subject is offered in block mode, involving three (two day each) modules, spread over a 12 week session.

Each block follows a similar structure, in that students are required to access pre-class review of subject reading/viewing material on Canvas. The material is designed to enable students to engage in meaningful discussions in class. Communication is integral to each class and the pre-reading material informs these conversations.

In workshops, students will have a formal lecture to re-assess understanding of concepts and methods and their applications in real-life situations using case studies. Students engage in extensive collaborative consultations to complete set exercises. These exercises provide opportunities for developing an understanding of concepts and methods relevant to the subject.

Content (topics)

1. Environmental policy context for energy systems

  • Overview of global environmental problems
  • Energy-economy-environmental interface
  • Rationale for environmental policy
  • Nature of environmental policy analysis
  • Historical perspective and experience
  • Institutional and policy contexts

2. Global environmental challenges

  • Pollution
  • Acid rain
  • Global warming

3. Environmental policy approaches

  • Voluntary
  • Command-and-control
  • Market-oriented
  • Hybrid

4. Command-and-control approaches

  • Standards
  • Regulation
  • Taxes

5. Market-oriented approach: emissions trading

  • Concepts
  • Methods
  • Issues

6. Other approaches

  • Clean development mechanisms (CDMs)
  • Activities implemented jointly (AIJ)
  • Energy efficiency

7. Selected topics

  • Carbon markets
  • Carbon trade
  • The issue of 'risk' in environmental policies
  • Environmental modelling
  • Environmental policy frameworks
  • Institutional and regulatory issues
  • Economic, social and political dimensions of environmental policies
  • Cultural perspectives

8. Case studies and applications

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Assignment 1

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1 and 2

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

B.1 and D.1

Type: Report
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 15%

Assessment task 2: Quiz 1

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1 and 2

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

B.1 and D.1

Type: Quiz/test
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 25%

Assessment task 3: Assignment 2

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1, 2 and 3

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

B.1 and D.1

Type: Report
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 15%

Assessment task 4: Quiz 2

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1, 2 and 3

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

B.1 and D.1

Type: Quiz/test
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 25%

Assessment task 5: Assignment 3

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1, 2 and 3

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

B.1 and D.1

Type: Report
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 10%

Assessment task 6: Class Participation

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1, 2 and 3

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

B.1 and D.1

Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 10%

Minimum requirements

In order to pass the subject, a student must achieve an overall mark of 50% or more.

Required texts

None prescribed. Selective lecture notes, journal articles and other readings are indicated on Canvas.