University of Technology Sydney

48240 Design and Innovation Fundamentals

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2022 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Engineering: Professional Practice and Leadership
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Undergraduate and Postgraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

Requisite(s): 33130 Mathematics 1 AND 48230 Introduction to Engineering Projects
These requisites may not apply to students in certain courses. See access conditions.

Description

Design and innovation are explored as fundamental engineering activities through a contextualised, authentic project. Students work in groups to develop an engineering prototype. The project promotes learning in the following areas:

  • design context and requirements: approaches to design, problem framing and creativity; requirements analysis involving legal, regulatory, technical and business requirements
  • design analysis: concepts of risks and uncertainties in engineering; use of engineering and system modelling approaches and methods and techniques for assessing engineering design trade-offs, engineering decision-making in the presence of risks and uncertainties and optimisation
  • new process, product and service development: role of engineers in evaluation and delivering new processes, products and services; designing for manufacture, sustainability, safety, innovation and business driven outcomes; risk management and design communication, documentation and review.

Students explore these concepts and use them to critique designed products, processes and systems. Students develop an understanding of the models of design and innovation processes and the responsibilities and authentic practice of engineers through application of these concepts (as well as scientific principles learnt in their field of practice subjects) to their project.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:

1. Select and apply a variety of thinking and problem-solving approaches within the engineering design process from problem definition and concept generation through to prototype development with a focus on innovative solutions.
2. Identify and apply the appropriate system-wide requirements (e.g. risk assessment, safety, business requirements etc.) for engineering design, demonstrating and justifying the application of trade-offs in the design process.
3. Apply professional communication skills to document the full design process.
4. Plan and monitor group work, manage group dynamics and appraise own and team member contributions.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

  • Socially Responsible: FEIT graduates identify, engage, interpret and analyse stakeholder needs and cultural perspectives, establish priorities and goals, and identify constraints, uncertainties and risks (social, ethical, cultural, legislative, environmental, economics etc.) to define the system requirements. (B.1)
  • Design Oriented: FEIT graduates apply problem solving, design and decision-making methodologies to develop components, systems and processes to meet specified requirements. (C.1)
  • Collaborative and Communicative: FEIT graduates work as an effective member or leader of diverse teams, communicating effectively and operating within cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural contexts in the workplace. (E.1)
  • Reflective: FEIT graduates critically self-review their performance to improve themselves, their teams, and the broader community and society. (F.1)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

Engineers Australia Stage 1 Competencies

This subject contributes to the development of the following Engineers Australia Stage 1 Competencies:

  • 1.5. Knowledge of engineering design practice and contextual factors impacting the engineering discipline.
  • 2.3. Application of systematic engineering synthesis and design processes.
  • 3.2. Effective oral and written communication in professional and lay domains.
  • 3.3. Creative, innovative and pro-active demeanour.
  • 3.4. Professional use and management of information.
  • 3.5. Orderly management of self, and professional conduct.
  • 3.6. Effective team membership and team leadership.

Teaching and learning strategies

The subject aims to develop students’ understanding of the engineering design process and to provide them with the skills to develop an engineering project from initial concept to the production of a prototype. A combination of workshops and tutorials are used to examine each stage of the design process. Special attention is given to balancing trade-offs in the design process and to techniques for safe design including using a number of tools to identify and treat risks that may arise in the engineering design process. Workshops and tutorials review and practice the important skills of written and oral communication.

The ability to work in project teams is an important attribute for any engineer – particularly related to design teams. Students will be required to work in teams during on activities which guide their project work and on their project deliverables to finally produce a prototype product, reports, and make an oral presentation. Teams of four students are selected by tutors (with input from students) in the tutorial session in Week 2 and finalised in Week 3. It is critical to students’ success in this subject that they engage with team work from team formation stage.

An aim of this subject is to help you develop academic and professional language and communication skills to succeed at university and in the workplace. During the course of this subject, you will complete milestone assessment tasks

that will, in addition to assessing your subject-specific learning objectives, assess the level of your academic and professional language.

To promote the development of professional skills including teamwork, critical evaluation, feedback and communication skills as well as academic honesty, a process of self and peer assessment will be used in this subject. This will be used both to provide constructive feedback to students on their engineering and teamwork skills including how they are contributing to their teams, as well as to determine individual assignment marks by appropriate adjustments to the group marks.

Content (topics)

The subject covers the following content areas:

  • Engineers as designers and innovators
  • Design and Engineering thinking: Approaches for thinking and problem-solving in an engineering context
  • The design process including problem definition, concept generation, requirements analysis, system design and detailed design.
  • New process and product development; lifecycles, research, technology, development and innovation
  • Design considerations and trade-offs: including safe design, methods of managing risk and uncertainty, regulations and professionalism, sustainability, design for manufacture and business decisions involved in design and innovation
  • Team dynamics and techniques to facilitate successfully working in engineering teams.
  • Review of written and oral communication skills.

Assessment

Assessment task 1: DISCOVERY: Project Context Report

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1 and 3

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

B.1, C.1, E.1 and F.1

Type: Project
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 5%
Length:

500 words (excluding any coversheets, title page, references or appendices)

Assessment task 2: SCOPING: Group Interim Report

Intent:

The in-class assessments will allow students to demonstrate that they have developed an understanding of design considerations and decision making in an engineering context. The assessments will focus on risk and financial decision making in engineering design projects.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1, 2 and 3

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

B.1, C.1, E.1 and F.1

Type: Project
Groupwork: Group, group and individually assessed
Weight: 10%
Length:

3000 words (excluding any coversheets, title page, table of contents, references or appendices)

Assessment task 3: PITCHING: Solution Pitch and Feedback

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1, 2 and 3

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

B.1, C.1, E.1 and F.1

Type: Project
Groupwork: Group, group and individually assessed
Weight: 15%
Length:

Maximum 3-min video; 3-5 sentences per video for feedback

Assessment task 4: PITCHING: Prototype Pitch and Feedback

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1, 2 and 3

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

B.1, C.1, E.1 and F.1

Type: Project
Groupwork: Group, group and individually assessed
Weight: 15%
Length:

Maximum 3-min video; 3-5 sentences per video for feedback

Assessment task 5: REPORTING: Group Design

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1, 2 and 3

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

B.1, C.1, E.1 and F.1

Type: Project
Groupwork: Group, group and individually assessed
Weight: 25%
Length:

Report 5000 words (excluding any coversheets, title page, table of contents, references or appendices)

Assessment task 6: REFLECTION: Individual Project Collaboration Statement and Reflection

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

4

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

B.1, C.1, E.1 and F.1

Type: Project
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 15%
Length:

1000 words (excluding any coversheets, title page, table of contents, references or appendices)

Assessment task 7: Engineering Decision Making Quiz

Intent:

To demonstrate an understanding of design considerations and decision making in an engineering context.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

2

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

C.1

Type: Quiz/test
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 15%

Minimum requirements

In order to pass the subject, a student must achieve an overall mark of 50% or more.
Students are required to participate in the team forming activities in the Week 2 and Week 3 tutorial. Students who are not in a team by Wednesday of week 4 may be refused permission to attempt assessment tasks 4, 5 and 6, and a fail will be recorded for the subject. Please refer to UTS Student Rule 3.8.

English language proficiency: It is a requirement of this subject that you complete Assessment tasks 1 and 6. Should you receive an unsatisfactory English language level, you may be required to complete further language support after the completion of this subject.

It is a requirement of this subject that students enrolled in the Masters of Professional Engineering ONLY complete OPELA. Students enrolled in the Masters of Professional Engineering who receive a Basic grade in the OPELA are required to attend 80% of the Language Development Tutorials in order to pass the subject. Students enrolled in the Masters of Professional Engineering who do not complete the OPELA and/or do not attend 80% of the Language Development Tutorials if required, will be referred to the Responsible Academic Officer in accordance with Student Rule 3.8.2, and a Fail X grade will be recorded for this subject.

Required texts

The Making of an Expert Engineer - James P Trevelyan, Boca Raton CRC Press, 2014. Available as an electronic copy through the UTS Library

Recommended texts

The Field Guide to Human-Centered Design, IDEO Organisation, 2015. Available online from IDEO.org

48240: Design and Innovation Fundamentals Gerard Volland and Paul Trott, Pearson Custom Text for UTS - ISBN 9781486007103, 2013.

References

The Making of an Expert Engineer - James P Trevelyan, Boca Raton CRC Press, 2014. Available as an electronic copy through the UTS Library

Is It Real? Can We Win? Is It Worth Doing? Managing Risk and Reward in an Innovation Portfolio, by George S. Day, Harvard Business Review, December 2007

Systems Engineering Guide, MITRE Corporation, 2014

Other resources

See Canvas and the lecture notes for additional references on each lecture topic.