University of Technology Sydney

42905 Marketing Technology

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2022 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Information Technology: Information, Systems and Modelling
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Postgraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

This subject gives non-marketers, especially managers with a technical background, a new way of thinking about customers and their organisation. In this respect, it treats marketing as the process of accessing new customers and understanding their needs, thereby creating value for the organisation. This subject covers the fundamentals of marketing with special emphasis upon the marketing of technology and the way technology is changing the practice of marketing. The subject also challenges students to critically analyse the field of marketing's contribution to environmental sustainability and social change. After introducing essential marketing concepts, the subject relates these to technology industries, focusing on the way innovation in technology is changing marketing practice. Throughout the subject, participants are challenged to consider the wider socioeconomic and environmental impacts and challenges facing contemporary marketing practices.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:

1. Identify the key components of product marketing in organisations
2. Develop and critically analyse marketing plans and tactics
3. Demonstrate insight into the marketing of services, software and B2B transactions
4. Assess the impact of technology on marketing practice
5. Actively critique the practice of marketing against emerging issues of ethics, environmental sustainability and social change
6. Demonstrate skill in the formal and informal presentation of ideas and strategies

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

  • Socially Responsible: FEIT graduates identify, engage, and influence stakeholders, and apply expert judgment establishing and managing constraints, conflicts and uncertainties within a hazards and risk framework to define system requirements and interactivity. (B.1)
  • Design Oriented: FEIT graduates apply problem solving, design thinking and decision-making methodologies in new contexts or to novel problems, to explore, test, analyse and synthesise complex ideas, theories or concepts. (C.1)
  • Technically Proficient: FEIT graduates apply theoretical, conceptual, software and physical tools and advanced discipline knowledge to research, evaluate and predict future performance of systems characterised by complexity. (D.1)
  • Collaborative and Communicative: FEIT graduates work as an effective member or leader of diverse teams, communicating effectively and operating autonomously within cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural contexts in the workplace. (E.1)

Teaching and learning strategies

Lectures, interactive class processes, case studies; guest speakers from industry, workshop presentations, and work-based assessment tasks.

Content (topics)

Topics have been designed to develop quickly the participants’ understanding of essential marketing concepts. These are then considered in the context of technology industries. Participants are then guided to consider the wider socio-economic and environmental impacts of, and challenges to, contemporary marketing practices.

Topic 1: Product marketing fundamentals

This topic provides a broad introduction to marketing covering the key terminology and concepts. Specific issues explored in this topic are:

  • Marketing philosophy and the role of marketing in the organisation
  • The strategic marketing framework
  • Market analysis for decision making and the importance of the brand
  • Product design, new product development and pricing considerations
  • Go-to-market choices such as advertising, promotion and channel selection

Topic 2: Marketing of technology products

This topic explores the characteristics of marketing software and IT services to other businesses. These transactions make up more than 60% of all goods sold. Specific issues covered in this topic area are:

  • B2B Organisational buying behaviour
  • B2B Inter-organisational relationships and networks
  • The characteristics of a service
  • Service quality and the service quality model
  • Strategic issues in marketing services
  • Marketing of software products

Topic 3: Emerging technological impacts on marketsand marketing

Technology is changing the way marketing is performed and how organisations interact with their customers. It is also fundamentally changing the way individuals interact with each other and with organisations. This topic explores the impact of technological change on marketing practice at the micro-economic level. Specific issues covered by this topic are:

  • The role of IT in marketing innovation
  • Technology’s influence on contemporary social change
  • Social networking and its influence on customer-organisation interactions
  • The rise of customer self-service and self marketing and its implications for marketing practice
  • Building and destroying a brand in the internet era
  • The explosion of data and data analysis and its impact on the practice of marketing

Topic 4: Societal change and marketing – the future of product marketing

This topic challenges students to critically analyse the practice of marketing and its role and culpability in supporting or stifling organisational, social and environmental change from both a micro-economic and macro-economic perspective. Specific issues covered by this topic are:

  • Environmental sustainability versus traditional notions of production and organisational growth
  • Lifetime product responsibility and the changing paradigm of production
  • Ethical and legal consequences of marketing
  • Marketing in a world of corporate social responsibility
  • The rise of individualism and the challenge to organisations
  • Marketing in a knowledge economy

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Case Study presentation

Intent:

This assignment gives you the opportunity to consider a marketing topic or case in depth. You will be provided with a 1-5 page reading, along with specific questions that must be answered.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1, 2, 3, 4 and 6

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

B.1, C.1, D.1 and E.1

Type: Presentation
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 40%
Length:

20 minute presentation (plus 5 minutes for answering questions)

Criteria:

Workshop Marking Guide

  • Answering the question & insight 10
  • Application of marketing concepts or depth of research 10
  • Quality of presentation 10
  • Creativity and promotion of discussion 10

Assessment task 2: Workplace Marketing Project

Intent:

This assignment gives you the opportunity to apply marketing concepts through the development of a comprehensive marketing plan for a new service or product.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs):

B.1, C.1, D.1 and E.1

Type: Report
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 60%
Length:

Written assignment. No set length

Criteria:

• Is the product feasible, realistic and easily understood?
• Is the differentiation of the product, the value proposition, target market and market positioning clearly stated and logical
• Has the organisational and industry context for the marketing plan including identification of any constraints or structural industry opportunities been clearly defined.
• Have the marketing concepts covered during the course been applied in the marketing plan
• Is the marketing plan appropriate for the particular class of product that is proposed (eg: the marketing requirements for a luxury good will differ from that of industrial software)
• Is the marketing plan well structured and easy to understand, do the conclusions follow logically throughout the plan

Minimum requirements

In order to pass the subject, a student must achieve an overall mark of 50% or more.

Required texts

The following text is highly recommended for this subject:

Elliott, G., Rundle-Thiele, S. & Waller, D., 2014, Marketing, 3rd Ed. Wiley, Australia

The following texts could be used instead of Elliott et al (2014):

Kotler, P., Burton, S., Deans, K., Brown, L. & Armstrong, G., 2013, Marketing, 9th Ed., Pearson, Australia (this is the ‘Australian’ version of this classic marketing text; you may also choose to use the international version instead)

Winer, R. & Dhar, R. 2011, Marketing Management (4th Edition), Pearson, Boston.

Recommended texts

Ellis, N. 2011, Business to Business Marketing: Relationships, Networks & Strategies , Oxford University Press, Oxford.

Hoffman, K., Bateson, J., Elliot, G. & Birch, D. 2010, Services Marketing – Concepts, Strategies & Cases, Cengage Learning, Melbourne.

References

Topic 1: Product marketing fundamentals
Elliott, G., Rundle-Thiele, S. & Waller, D., 2014, Marketing, 3rd Ed. Wiley, Australia

Kotler, P., Burton, S., Deans, K., Brown, L. & Armstrong, G., 2013, Marketing (9th Edition), Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest.
Winer, R. & Dhar, R. 2011, Marketing Management (4th Edition), Pearson, New Jersey.
Armstrong G. & Kottler P. 2011, Marketing: An Introduction (10th Edition), Prentice Hall, New Jersey.
Raju, J. & Zhang, J. 2010, Smart Pricing – How Google, Priceline and Leading Businesses use Pricing Innovation for Profitability, Pearson, New Jersey.

Topic 2: Marketing of technology products
Elliott, G., Rundle-Thiele, S. & Waller, D., 2014, Marketing, 3rd Ed. Wiley, Australia

Kotler, P., Burton, S., Deans, K., Brown, L. & Armstrong, G., 2013, Marketing (9th Edition), Pearson Australia, Frenchs Forest.
Winer, R. & Dhar, R. 2011, Marketing Management (4th Edition), Pearson, New Jersey.
Ellis, N. 2011, Business-to-Business Marketing: Relationships, Networks & Strategies, Oxford University Press, Oxford.
Edelman, D. 2010, “Branding in the digital age”, Harvard Business Review, Dec 2010, pp. 63-69.
Keller, L. 2011, “The Brand Report Card”, Harvard Business Review – Reinventing Your Marketing, Harvard Business Review eds., pp. 109-135.

Anderson, J., Narus, J. & Rossum, W. 2011, “Customer Value Propositions in Business Markets”, Harvard Business Review – Reinventing Your Marketing, 2011, Harvard Business Review eds., pp. 155-179
Hoffman, D., Bateson, J., Elliot, G. & Birch, D. 2010, Services Marketing - Concepts, Strategies & Cases, Cengage Learning, Melbourne.

Topic 3: Emerging technological impacts on markets and marketing
Elliott, G., Rundle-Thiele, S. & Waller, D., 2014, Marketing, 3rd Ed. Wiley, Australia

Rosenbaum, S. 2011, Curation Nation, McGraw Hill, New York.
Sharp, B. 2010, How Brands Grow – What Marketers Don’t Know, Oxford University Press, Oxford.
Strauss, J. & Frost, R. 2012, E-Marketing (6th Edition), Pearson, Boston.
Hoffman, D., Bateson, J., Elliot, G. & Birch, D., 2010, Services Marketing - Concepts, Strategies & Cases, Cengage Learning, Melbourne.
Armstrong G. & Kottler P., 2011, Marketing An Introduction, Prentice Hall, New jersey, 10th Ed.
Winer, R. & Dhar, R., 2011, Marketing Management, Pearson, Boston, 4th Ed.
Reiner, V., 2011, “Are you building or eroding your band?”, Professional Marketing, Australian Marketing Institute, Issue 4, Oct-Dec, pp. 22-24
Ritson 2011, “Social media: oversold and overrated”, Professional Marketing, Australian Marketing Institute, Issue 4, Oct-Dec, p.17-21

Topic 4: Societal change and marketing – the future of product marketing
Hamel, G. & Breen, B. 2007,The Future of Management, Harvard Business School Publishing, Boston
Zuboff, S. & Maxmin, J. 2003, The Support Economy – Why Corporations are Failing Individuals and the Next Generation of Capitalism, Allen Lane, London.
Chouinard, Y., Ellison, J. & Ridgeway, R., 2011, “The sustainable economy”, Harvard Business Review, Oct 2011, pp. 52-62
Manzini, E., 1995, “Prometheus of the Everyday”, Discovering Design – Explorations in Design Studies, University of Chicago Press, Eds. Buchanan & Margolin, pp. 219-243
Ehrlich & Ehrlich, 1990, The Population Explosion, Simon & Schuster, New York
Tabbey, N. 2011, “Green washing and other environmental scams”, Keeping Good Companies – Journal of Chartered Secretaries Australia Ltd, Vol. 63, No. 9.