University of Technology Sydney

11170 Landform

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2022 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: Architecture
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Undergraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

This subject provides an introduction to the physical properties and design applications of landform. The subject investigates topography through the study of landscape influences such as geology, geomorphology and hydrology; and explores topographic archetypes, such as slopes, ramps, stairs, terraces through international precedents. Two- and three-dimensional representational forms and techniques to generate, analyse and communicate topographies using analogue and digital techniques including hand-drawn studies, digital production methods and physical model-making are explored.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. Acquire an understanding of physical attributes of a site to analyse and appreciate topography.
2. Founded on standards and researched design principles, develop techniques at a detailed scale that address landform modulation.
3. Create physically accurate and materially expressive two and three dimensional representations of existing and proposed topographies, using disciplinary conventions and scale to good effect.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes:

  • Apply an informed, ethical position towards social, technical and environmental issues and practices. (A.1)
  • Acknowledge, respect and engage with indigenous, cultural and historical knowledge systems. (A.2)
  • Communicate ideas professionally. (C.2)
  • Create designs that respond to their context in formally or conceptually innovative ways. (I.1)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

The term CAPRI is used for the five Design, Architecture and Building faculty graduate attribute categories where:

C = communication and groupwork

A = attitudes and values

P = practical and professional

R = research and critique

I = innovation and creativity.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs) are linked to these categories using codes (e.g. C-1, A-3, P-4, etc.).

Teaching and learning strategies

How to read the subject’s documentation?

This document, the subject outline, provides key information about 11170. Supplementary information including briefs and programs are on Canvas.

How is the subject structured?

The subject is structured around a series of weekly seminars and inter-related assessment tasks. Field trips will be organised for all students. Computer labs and workshops will be available.

What preparation is needed for class?

The work produced for each of the program’s steps forms the basis of discussions in class. Student must come to class with work.

Feedback

There will be numerous opportunities for students to receive feedback during the session. The feedback provided will vary in form, purpose and in its degree of formality:

a) Formative Feedback

Formative feedback is provided during the learning process, when work for an assessment task is in production. Students should keep a written record of the feedback they receive. If a student is confused about a particular aspect of their feedback they should seek clarification from the teaching team.

b) Summative feedback

Summative feedback focuses on assessment outcomes. It is used to indicate how successfully a student has performed in terms of specific assessment criteria. Students should direct any queries about summative feedback to the subject coordinator. In the first instance this should be done by email.

Content (topics)

  • Landscape analysis of geology, hydrology and geomorphology
  • Design principles, building codes and standards to address landform
  • Archetypal topographic forms
  • Design processes for landform manipulation, across digital and analogue domains
  • Topographic representational strategies: tools for investigation and communication

Assessment

Assessment task 1: 3 ways up

Intent:

Students will develop a detailed physical, material and experiential understanding of topography by addressing access. This understanding will be evidenced through a range of design iterations, and 2 and 3 dimensional representations.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2 and 3

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.1, C.2 and I.1

Type: Design/drawing/plan/sketch
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 40%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Analysis and appreciation of landform and its influences represented at multiple scales 20 1 A.1
Development of design options that respond to the landform and its influences. 40 2 I.1
Clear and accurate communication that represents the proposal. 40 3 C.2
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: 3 platforms

Intent:

Students will develop a detailed physical, material and experiential understanding of topography by addressing flatness. This understanding will be evidenced through a range of design iterations, and 2 and 3 dimensional representations.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2 and 3

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.2, C.2 and I.1

Type: Design/drawing/plan/sketch
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 60%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Understanding of the site and all its influences. 20 1 A.2
Considered exploration of the possibilities that landform manipulation offers 40 2 I.1
Advanced representation in drawing and model 40 3 C.2
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Minimum requirements

Attendance

The Faculty of DAB expects students to attend at least 80% of the scheduled contact hours for each enrolled subject. Achievement of subject aims is difficult if classes are not attended. Where assessment tasks are to be presented personally in class, attendance is mandatory.

Pursuant to “UTS Rule 3.8.2”, students who do not satisfy attendance requirements, may be refused permission by the Responsible Academic Officer to be considered for assessment for this subject.

Late and Incomplete Assignments

Assignments submitted after the due time/date will incur the late penalties listed below. Late submissions will not incur the late penalties listed, only if a formal extension of time has been granted by the Subject Coordinator. This should be approved BEFORE the submission deadline where possible. Work submitted more than 5 working days after the stated submission date, will not be accepted for assessment unless a formal extension of time has been granted by the Subject Coordinator on receipt of a Special Consideration Form.

(Please refer to the “Exemptions and Absence” and “Special Consideration” sections of the DAB Subject Information Book).

Late Penalties

Work submitted up to 5 days* later than the deadline should have an “Extensions and Absence form” attached (with appropriate Doctor’s Certificate or equivalent documentation). Depending on the circumstances, the Subject Coordinator may apply the following penalties:

Up to 1 day late: 10% late reduction **(24 hours from the specified deadline)

Up to 2 days late: 20% late reduction

Up to 3 days late: 30% late reduction

Up to 4 days late: 40% late reduction

Up to 5 days late: 50% late reduction

Over 5 days late: NOT ACCEPTED

• The 10% per day penalty is applied to the mark that would have been received if the submission had been on time.

• Any work submitted after 5 working days late would need a ‘Special Consideration’ document to be accepted for assessment.

• Students cannot expect to receive verbal or written feedback for work submitted more than 5 days late.

* If equipment or software is not available for students to complete the late work, then the Subject Coordinator may decide to exclude weekends from the number of days late in calculating the penalty.

** Where no exact time is specified for a deadline it will be assumed that the deadline is 9am on the date specified.