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96727 Palliative Care

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2019 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Health
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Postgraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

This subject supports students in consolidating and synthesising knowledge in relation to palliative care provided across varied health care contexts and globally. Teaching and learning strategies focus on developing skills in the following core areas: effective communication at the end of life, symptom assessment (physical and psychosocial) and management for people with advanced progressive life-limiting illness, optimising care across interdisciplinary healthcare teams and across differing health settings, decision making grounded in best evidence, cultural and spiritual care, and grief and loss. In the master classes, students are supported to challenge and extend their knowledge of symptom management and end of life care to enable them to better describe the provision of optimal care for patients with palliative care needs, and their families/carers. Finally, strategies to enable resilience, emotional health and wellbeing, foster knowledge and skills for a supportive working culture.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:
A. Distinguish key practices and principles of a palliative approach to care, delivered within a range of contexts for different patient populations
B. Examine and apply effective communication knowledge and skills in the context of working with people who have palliative and end-of-life care needs, and their families/carers
C. Develop and apply capabilities in the assessment and evidence based management of common symptoms in palliative care
D. Critically reflect upon and articulate ‘compassion values’ and ethical care, and how this knowledge and learning can uphold the care of vulnerable groups and support self-care.
E. Critically appraise and apply the theory, research and evidence based palliative care literature to their own clinical practice and clinical decision making.
F. Critically assess and evaluate perspectives and knowledge of palliative care and make links to acquisition of new learning.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the following graduate attributes:

  • Are reflective critical thinkers who contribute to practice, policy and research to enhance health care and health outcomes (1.0)
  • Are effective, collaborative and responsive leaders (2.0)
  • Communicate appropriately and consistently in diverse situations (4.0)
  • Embody the professional qualities appropriate to the scope of their role (5.0)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

The aim of this subject is for students to identify learning needs in the domain of palliative care and develop knowledge, skills, critical thinking and reflective capabilities for care and service provision to individuals with life limiting illnesses, and their families/carers. This subject will broaden the students' orientation to understanding the needs and capabilities of individuals, communities, and health, social and government services, in managing the care of people in the palliative phase.

Teaching and learning strategies

Students will attend three days of interactive workshops that will include opportunities to interact with the lecturer, students from different disciplines and palliative care industry and academic experts. The teaching and learning approach in the workshops will be active and collaborative and include case scenario group work and simulated role play, round table discussions, social media engagement. Students will complete pre-workshop activities online. Face to face interactive workshops will enable student collaborations and extend knowledge gained in online activities and blog activities. Interactions with industry experts from the field will allow for collaborative learning and additionally exposure to industry leaders will provide students with a broad view of change and improvement in the palliative care context.

Content (topics)

  • Overview of the history, practice and philosophy of palliative care
  • Communication at the end of life
  • Symptom (physical and psychosocial) assessment and management for people with advanced life-limiting illness
  • Apply theory to practice for decision making to achieve best palliative care outcomes for patients, their families/carers and communities
  • Optimising care across healthcare teams and across differing health settings
  • Cultural and spiritual care for people with advanced life limiting illness
  • Legal and ethical aspects related to the care for people with advanced life limiting illness
  • Supporting people in the context of grief and loss
  • Self-care and resilience for staff and services involved in the provision of palliative care

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Critical incident reflection

Intent:

Reflection is an important component of experiential learning. Critical incident reflection focusses o a particualr incident (not necessarily dramatic), that had an impact on personal and professsional learning It brings together components of experience for making considered changes and improvements to practice, knowledge and meaning. This activity aims to facilitate an examination of learning needs in a particular area of palliative care.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A and F

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

1.0 and 5.0

Type: Reflection
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 15%
Length:

600 words

Criteria:

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A and F

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s): 1.0 and 5.0

Assessment task 2: Development of Infographic

Intent:

Infographics are data and/or information rich visualisations, used to educate and inform in a digital platform for social media. Students will work in groups to research and collate content in a way that is captivating and accessible to a range of consumers.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A, B, C and E

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

1.0 and 4.0

Type: Design/drawing/plan/sketch
Groupwork: Group, group assessed
Weight: 30%
Criteria:

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A, B, C and E

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s): 1.0 and 4.0

Assessment task 3: Case scenario background

Intent:

The intent of this assessment is for students to address their learning needs identified in assessment 1 (critical reflection) through the development of a case study background. This assessment structures the problem and context for the unfolding case scenario in Assessment 4.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A and E

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

4.0 and 5.0

Type: Case study
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 10%
Length:

500 words

Criteria:

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A and E

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s): 4.0 and 5.0

Assessment task 4: Unfolding case scenario

Intent:

This assessment contributes to student learning by developing clinical reasoning skills and well integrated contextualized knowledge through the creation of an unfolding case scenario. The activity facilitates understanding for complexity of situations in a palliative care context, aligned to the students identified learning needs

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A, B, D, E and F

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

1.0, 2.0, 4.0 and 5.0

Type: Case study
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 30%
Length:

1500-2000 words

Criteria:

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A, B, D, E and F

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s): 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 and 5.0

Assessment task 5: Contribution to forums

Intent:

This assessment facilitates student engagement outside of face to face teaching through reflective and collaborative communication in three moderated forums that consider the concept of suffering in palliative care.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A, B, D, E and F

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

2.0, 4.0 and 5.0

Type: Reflection
Groupwork: Group, individually assessed
Weight: 15%
Length:

3 x 250 word forum discussion posts and responses

Criteria:

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A, B, D, E and F

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s): 2.0, 4.0 and 5.0.

Required texts

There is no prescibed text for this elective subject. Linkage to resources material will be provided for the subject in UTSOnline.

References

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2014, Palliative care services in Australia 2014, Cat. no. HWI 128, AIHW, Canberra.

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2011, Trends in palliative care in Australian hospitals, Cat. no. HWI 112, AIHW, Canberra.

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2011, Identifying palliative care separations in admitted patient data: technical paper, Cat. no. HWI 113, AIHW, Canberra.

McCabe M.S. & Coyle, N., Ethical and Legal Issues in Palliative Care, 2014, Seminars in Oncology Nursing, 30 (4), 287–295.

Mills, J. Rosenberg, J.P. & McInerney, F. 2015, Building community capacity for end of life: an investigation of community capacity and its implications for health promoting palliative care in the Australian Capital Territory, Critical Public Health, 25 (2): 218-230.

Sandsdalen, T. Hov, R. Høye, S. Rystedt, I. & Wilde-Larsson, B. 2015, Patients’ preferences in palliative care: A systematic mixed study, Palliative Medicine, 29 (5): 399-419.

Smith, G. Bernacki, R. & Block, S.D.2015 The Role of Palliative Care in Population Management and Accountable Care Organizations, Journal of Palliative Medicine, 18(6): 486-494.

Weil, J. Weiland, T.J. Lane, H. Jelinek, A. Boughey, M. Marck, C.H. & Philip, J. 2015 What's in a name? A qualitative exploration of what is understood by "palliative care" in the emergency department, Palliative Medicine, 29 (4): 293-301.

Wittenberg-Lyles, E. Goldsmith, J. Platt, C. Palliative Care Communication, 2014, Seminars in Oncology Nursing, 30 (4): 280-289.

Other resources

UTS Student Centre
Building 10
Monday to Friday: 9am - 5pm
Tel: 1300 ASK UTS (1300 275 887)

Details for student centres: www.uts.edu.au/current-students/contacts/general-contacts
For other resources/information refer to the Faculty of Health website (www.uts.edu.au/about/faculty-health), the Health Student Guide (www.uts.edu.au/sites/default/files/uts-health-student-guide.pdf) and UTSOnline at: https://online.uts.edu.au/webapps/login/

UTS Library
The Library has a wide range of resources, facilities and services to support you including textbooks, subject readings, old exam papers, academic writing guides, health literature databases, workshops, a gaming room and bookable group study rooms. There is also a team of librarians to help you with all your questions.
W: lib.uts.edu.au, Facebook: utslibrary, Twitter: @utslibrary Tel: (02) 9514 3666

Improve your academic and English language skills
Marks for all assessment tasks such as assignments and examinations are given not only for what you write but also for how you write. If you would like the opportunity to improve your academic and English language skills, make an appointment with the HELPS (Higher Education Language & Presentation Support) Service in Student Services.

HELPS (Higher Education Language & Presentation Support)
HELPS provides assistance with English language proficiency and academic language. Students who need to develop their written and/or spoken English should make use of the free services offered by HELPS, including academic language workshops, vacation intensive courses, drop-in consultations, individual appointments and Conversations@UTS (www.ssu.uts.edu.au/helps). HELPS staff are also available for drop-in consultations at the UTS Library. Phone (02) 9514 9733

Please see www.uts.edu.au for additional information on other resources provided to students by UTS.