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96090 Specialist Practice

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Health (GEM)
Credit points: 6 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

This subject gives students the opportunity to learn about selected advanced and specialised physiotherapy practice. Students demonstrate advanced clinical reasoning in cases of complex disorders or specialised areas of practice including clients with specialised and complex conditions or emerging areas of practice, such as intensive care (adult/paediatric/neonatal), burns/plastics, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, gender health, amputees, hand therapy, acquired head injury and emergency department physiotherapy. Cases are selected to challenge students to apply recent scientific evidence-based findings relating to the pathophysiology of conditions, their clinical investigation, immediate treatment and long-term management. Students are encouraged to analyse clinical findings and develop appropriate interventions, based on sound clinical reasoning, to advance their understanding and care of patients with specialised and complex disorders. Students have the opportunity to discuss and debate advanced practice and advanced practitioner roles and identify emerging and potential leadership opportunities in these contexts.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

02. Link structural and/or functional pathophysiology to a client’s clinical presentation
05. Integrate appropriate supplementary information in the diagnosis of a client’s condition
06. Apply clinical reasoning to determine best physiotherapy care
07. Conduct a culturally responsive objective examination
11. Interpret assessment results
12. Develop a problem list
14. Execute a differential diagnosis for a given case
19. Provide an evidence-based justification for the selection of a particular intervention
22. Execute an effective intervention
28. Provide feedback to clients during an intervention
29. Design a discharge and/or ongoing care plan for the client
33. Integrate new technologies into physiotherapy care

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

This subject contributes to producing evidence-informed, practice-ready graduates, as it builds on many of the clinical subjects covered in the course by extending physiotherapy management to complex and specialised cases. Students gain an understanding of specialised and advanced physiotherapy practice.

Teaching and learning strategies

Prep work

Prep work is undertaken prior to masterclasses and workshops. Prep work can include watching a video, reading a blog entry/website/textbook chapter/journal article/magazine article and/or listening to a podcast/video/interview. Questions often accompany the prep work so students read with intent which encourage deep reading. Content covered in prep work is strongly linked to content covered in masterclasses and workshops. Please ensure prep work is carried out so that you have spent some time accessing and making sense of ideas. Attending the masterclasses and workshops will allow you to test these ideas and get feedback from your teachers and peers which will further consolidate your learning. Your knowledge and understanding of the prep work will be tested and applied using quizzes, group discussions and practical activities in masterclasses and workshops.

Masterclasses

Masterclasses are conducted in groups of 60 or more. There is usually a presentation of content by the teacher followed by activities which build on the prep work and the content presented. These activities are varied and require students to work alone, work in pairs or work in groups of 3 or more.

Examples of these activities include short quizzes, group discussions and “One Minute Paper” where students reflect on what they have learnt in class and share this with the class. Group discussions often involve solving a problem or answering a question based on case studies or the content topic. All activities are facilitated by the teacher. Feedback is provided by the teacher where there is discrepancy in the knowledge and understanding of the content or disagreement in opinions between groups. Feedback can also be provided by peers.

Workshops

Workshops are conducted in groups of 30-35. Content in classes often include the practice of practical skills and further consolidation of information gained in masterclasses. These activities are varied and often require students to work in pairs or work in groups of 3 or more. Examples of these activities include the practice of practical skills, simulated role play of patients in case studies, group discussions, debates, brainstorming session and “One Minute Paper”. In the classes where practical skills are taught, the teacher demonstrates these practical skills and provide guidance on how feedback should be provided. After the demonstration, students work in small groups of 3 or more to practise. Feedback on their techniques are provided by the teacher or their peers. The content of feedback will cover professionalism, communication, equipment set-up, environment set-up, positioning of patient, positioning of therapist and manual handling/manual guidance. Feedback on common errors and suggestions for improvement will also be included. In the classes where theoretical content are consolidated and applied, feedback is provided by the teacher where there is discrepancy in the knowledge and understanding of the content or disagreement in opinions between groups. Feedback can also be provided by peers.

Content (topics)

This subject contributes to producing evidence-informed, practice-ready graduates, as it builds on many of the clinical subjects covered in the course by extending physiotherapy management to complex and specialised cases. Students will gain an understanding of specialised and advanced physiotherapy practice.

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Practical exam (Individual) - MUST PASS

Intent:

This assessment task will give students the opportunity to demonstrate their skills in conducting an assessment and treatment session for a patient with a spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury or limb amputation. The content to be assessed includes all content covered in weeks 2 to 5.

Graduate Attributes: Practice ready

Objective(s):

This task is aligned with the following subject learning objectives:

07, 11, 22 and 28

Type: Examination
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 30%
Length:

15 minutes (including 5 mins reading time)

Criteria:

Please refer to marking criteria on UTSOnline.

Assessment task 2: Written assignment - Clinical reasoning for treatment planning (Individual)

Intent:

This assessment task will give students the opportunity to demonstrate their clinical reasoning skills in determining a treatment plan for a patient with a complex condition (multi-trauma). The content to be assessed includes all content covered from weeks 2 to 9.

Graduate Attributes: Practice ready, person-centred, culturally competent, research enabled

Objective(s):

This task is aligned with the following subject learning objectives:

02, 05, 06, 11, 14 and 29

Type: Case study
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 40%
Length:

No more than 5 pages for the assessment and treatment plans

Criteria:

Please refer to UTSOnline for the marking criteria for this assessment task. Marks have been allocated to the assessment plan (20%) and treatment plan (20%). Students can find the assessment and treatment plans at the end of the case study.

Assessment task 3: Clinical written examination (Individual)

Intent:

This assessment task will give students the opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge and clinical reasoning process in various topics covered in weeks 2 to 13.

Graduate Attributes: Practice ready, research enabled, professionally competent, person centred

Objective(s):

This task is aligned with the following subject learning objectives:

02, 11, 12, 19 and 33

Type: Examination
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 30%
Length:

2 hours

Criteria:

Marks have been allocated to each question in the written exam (marks in bold add up to 30%). Your total grade on the written exam will depend on the number of correct answers/marks obtained for each question.

Minimum requirements

In order to pass the subject, you are required to

  • complete all assessments items,
  • pass the practical exam,
  • achieve an overall grade of ≥ 50, and
  • attend a minimum of 85% of classes.

Required texts

Coursework Assessments Policy

Coursework Assessments Procedures

Graduate School of Health Policy, Guidelines and Procedures (login required)

Recommended texts

Harvey L (2008) Management of Spinal Cord Injuries: A Guide for Physiotherapists. London: Churchill Livingstone, Elsevier.

Shumway-Cook A and Woollacott MH (2016) Motor Control: Translating Research into Clinical Practice (5th edition) Philadelphia, US: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Carr J and Shepherd R (2010) Neurological Rehabilitation: Optimizing Motor Performance. London, UK: Churchill Livingstone, Elsevier.

Stokes M and Stack E (2013) Physical Management for Neurological Conditions. London, UK: Churchill Livingstone, Elsevier.

Brukner P and Khan KQC (2012) Brukner & Khan's Clinical Sports Medicine. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Main E and Denehy L (2016) Cardiorespiratory Physiotherapy Adults and Paediatrics (5th edition). Formerly Physiotherapy for Respiratory and Cardiac Problems. London, UK: Churchill Livingstone, Elsevier.

Other resources

Intensive care (paediatric, neonatal)

ICN (2016): The Intensive Care Network (ICN) Resources: http://intensivecarenetwork.com/ [Accessed 04 April 2016]

Spinal cord injury

SCIRE (2010) Spinal Cord Injury Research Evidence [Online]. Available at: http://www.scireproject.com/about-scire [Accessed 11 March 2016]

ASIA (2016) American Spinal Injury Association – ASIA Learning Centre [Online]. Available at: http://www.asia-spinalinjury.org/elearning/elearning.php [Accessed 11 March 2016]

SCIA (2005) Spinal Cord Injuries Australia – For people with Spinal Cord Injury [Online]. Available at: https://scia.org.au/sci-resources [Accessed 11 March 2016]

Traumatic brain injury

Physiotherapy for the Acute Care Management of Traumatic Brain Injury developed by NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation http://www.aci.health.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0003/159456/physiotherapy_for_tbi.pdf [Accessed 04 April 2016]

Traumatic Brain injury Resources. Available at http://synapse.org.au/ [Accessed 04 April 2016]

Amputees

AustPAR (2016) Australian Physiotherapists in Amputee Rehabilitation [Online]. Available at: http://www.austpar.com/portals/gait/tools.php [Accessed 11 March 2016]

Burns

Clinical practice guidelines: Burn patient management developed by NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation

http://www.aci.health.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0009/250020/Burn_Patient_Management_-_Clinical_Practice_Guidelines.pdf [Accessed 04 April 2016]

ACI Statewide Burn Injury Service Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy Clinical Practice Guidelines developed by NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation http://www.aci.health.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0018/236151/Clinical-Practice-Guidelines-Burns-Physiotherapy-and-Occupational-Therapy.pdf [Accessed 04 April 2016]