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92646 Introduction to Health Promotion

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Health
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Undergraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

Health promotion provides the process for increasing awareness of factors that impact on health and health enhancement strategies. This subject considers the impact of public policy on health and health behaviours. Individual and population level interventions are examined and evaluated. Students explore health promotion in relation to Indigenous health and take into account culture, diversity within populations, language and dialect differences, socioeconomic circumstance, geographical location and the continuing impact of colonisation on improving health of communities.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:
A. Describe the principles of health promotion in relation to Indigenous health
B. Review national and global strategies that support the introduction and continuation of health promotion as a public health priority
C. Discuss how the principles of health promotion apply to professional practice
D. Critically analyse a program of health promotion designed for an Indigenous population
E. Develop a health promotion resource relevant to specific Indigenous target group
F. Develop academic thinking, reading and writing skills

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the following graduate attributes:

  • Advocate for individuals and communities and supports enabling positive change (2.0)
  • Engage in research and critical thinking to integrate knowledge and translate into action (3.0)
  • Take a health equality and human rights approach to healthcare provision (5.0)
  • Demonstrate professional cultural competency which contributes to the health and wellbeing of Indigenous Australians, inclusive of physical, social, emotional and spiritual wellness (6.0)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

This subject is undertaken in a blended approach to learning with students attending two five day block workshops on campus each semester accompanied by integrated learning in the online/distance environment. This approach to teaching is responsive to the needs of the student cohort. The flexibility of the blended approach is attractive to the cohort of students who can balance study around their professional and other commitments.

Face to face workshops allow for students to collaborate together in group assessments and continue this communication through discussion boards and virtual classrooms. The multidisciplinary and national student base and engagement with experts within the field additionally allows for the collaborative learning, development of enduring relationships, future networks and citizenship within the field.

The learning and teaching strategies utilised in this subject are developed collaboratively and include cultural guidance, subject and content specialists input and learning and teaching expertise.

Teaching and learning strategies

Generic statement

This subject is undertaken in a blended approach to learning with students attending two five day block workshops on campus each semester accompanied by integrated learning in the online/distance environment.

Face to face workshops allow for students to collaborate together in group activities and assessments and continue this communication through discussion boards and virtual classrooms. The multidisciplinary and national student base and engagement with experts within the field additionally allows for the collaborative learning, development of enduring relationships, future networks and citizenship within the field.

The learning and teaching strategies utilised in this subject are developed collaboratively and include cultural guidance, subject and content specialists input and learning and teaching expertise and include:

Online learning activities

Students access online learning resources including podcasts, videos, professional and grey literature prior to attending face-to-face sessions. Attendance patterns for this subject require a reliance on the delivery of content and support of learning through distance modes. Online activities are then reviewed and discussed in class to share learning, experiences and reflections.

Stories and scenarios

Stories and scenarios are used to help students explore health and wellbeing related scenarios. Cases depict patients/consumers and their families in a primary health care setting. Students use these scenarios to learn concepts, interpret information, form judgments and develop creative solutions. Critical thinking is developed through analysis, interpretation of and reflection on issues or situations.

Oral presentations

Students design, develop and deliver presentations to the class and will receive feedback from peers and teachers not only on their knowledge of a subject area, but also their ability to communicate their thoughts, and relevant information in a clear, coherent, and confident manner.

Collaborative learning activities

The majority of the face-to-face time in this subject will involve collaborative group activities and workshops. Students will be supported to engage in content prior to attending class and class time will focus on group learning and mentored activities to support learning.

Personal, Professional and Expert Narratives

Guests are engaged to provide students with personal and professional stories in relation to the subject content. Hearing stories from both a professional and personal perspective supports students to relate learning to real world situations

Content (topics)

  • Health promotion principles
  • National and international approaches to health promotion for public health
  • Evidence based health promotion
  • Exemplars in health promotion
  • Critiquing health promotion activities
  • Indigenous health promotion programs
  • Health promotion program planning, design and evaluation

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Critical analysis of a health promotion activity or resource

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A, B, C, D, E and F

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

2.0, 3.0, 5.0 and 6.0

Weight: 50%
Length:

2000 words

Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
1 30 A 2.0
2 20 B 3.0
3 20 C 5.0
4 30 D, E, F 6.0
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Development of a health promotion resource or activity

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

C, D and F

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

3.0, 5.0 and 6.0

Weight: 50%
Length:

Variable

Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
1 50 C 3.0
2 20 D 5.0
3 30 F 6.0
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

References

Fleming, M.L. & Parker, E. 2006, Health Promotion: Principles and practice in the Australian context, Allen & Unwin, Australia.

Guzys, D. & Petrie, E. (eds) 2013, An Introduction to Community and Primary Health Care, Cambridge University Press, Melbourne.

Liamputtong, P., Fanany, R. & Verrinder, G. (eds) 2012, Health, Illness and Well-being: Perspectives and social determinants, Oxford University Press, Melbourne.