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92614 Child and Family Health Nursing 1

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2019 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Health
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Postgraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

The clinical focus of this subject is intended to give students essential skills for practice in working with families with young children from birth to age five. It includes the practical application of the parameters of normal development in early childhood, with particular focus on attachment theory in infancy and normal variations in child behaviours. It supports the health role of the child and family health nurse in undertaking comprehensive assessments of infants and young children 0–5 years of age and in providing anticipatory guidance to alleviate distress and worry in parents. The subject increases students' abilities to support and instil confidence in parents caring for a young baby, and to provide opportunities for social support and education. The subject requires the successful completion of a clinical experience program of 40 hours, undertaken as five single 8-hour days in an early childhood health centre.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:
A. Demonstrate a beginning understanding and application of attachment theory and early brain development in practice
B. Explain and apply the evidence-based knowledge of normal variations in behaviour of infants and support parents to choose and implement management strategies that are specific to the child and family’s needs
C. Explain the feeding interaction as being central to the quality of first relationships
D. Communicate and reflect on respectful approaches to working in partnership with families that values world view differences
E. Collaborate with parents to competently perform comprehensive developmental, physical and socio-emotional health assessments of an infant and their parent to identify health and developmental problems using a range of evidence based assessment tools
F. Collaborate with families to develop, initiate and evaluate evidence based intervention strategies

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the following graduate attributes:

  • A graduate of this course practices within a strengths-based, relationship-focused, family-partnership wellness model (1.0)
  • A graduate of this course demonstrates cognitive flexibility and reflective functioning when working with families and young children (2.0)
  • A graduate of this course promotes the primacy of early childhood and the importance of first relationships in relation to health and wellbeing outcomes throughout the lifespan (3.0)
  • A graduate of this course exhibits specialist nursing knowledge and skills in the care of young children, parents and families at beginning practitioner level (4.0)
  • A graduate of this course is a critical thinker who is able to assess a body of evidence and integrate it into practice (5.0)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

This subject contributes to the following graduate attributes:

  • Practices within a strengths-based, relationship-focused, family partnership wellness model (relationships).
  • Demonstrates cognitive flexibility and reflective functioning when working with families and young children (EQ).
  • Promotes the primacy of early childhood and the importance of first relationships in relation to health and wellbeing outcomes throughout the lifespan (health).
  • Exhibits specialist nursing knowledge and skills in the care of young children, parents and families at beginning practitioner level (professional competence).
  • A critical thinker who is able to assess a body of evidence and integrate it into practice (Evidence based practice).

Teaching and learning strategies

This subject utilizes a range of teaching and learning strategies, including:

Learning guide: This subject benefits from the provision of a learning guide, which provides students with an overall plan for the subject, learning strategies and resources. The guide includes preparatory readings in infant growth and development and child health issues, and follow up activities, including reflective questions.

On-campus study days: Students benefit from on campus study days, where they have the opportunity to to participate in health and wellbeing scenarios and role plays facilitated by clinicians and teaching staff. These scenarios depict families of infants, in order to explore concepts, consider clinical judgment and develop critical thinking. Feedback is provided by the teaching staff, clinicians and peers to develop and guide student’s clinical judgment.

Learning portfolio: Students undertake learning activities as part of this subject that will contribute to their professional portfolio. This record encourages students to take an active role in the documentation, observation, and review of their own progress. It is a powerful tool for focusing the student’s awareness on their own strengths and development as a child and family health nurse, and provides them with evidence for the purpose of seeking employment in child and family health.

Clinical placement: Students complete 40 hours of clinical placement experience. Placements are provided in level 1 universal child and family health clinics in metropolitan, rural and regional settings. Students have the opportunity to explore and assess growth and development, and practice health assessment, communication skills and provide nursing care under the supervision of child and family health nurses and in partnership with families and other health care professionals.

Content (topics)

Unit 1: Growth and development in the early years

  • Review theories and principles of growth and development in infancy
  • Initiation of management strategies where variations from normal are identified
  • The effect of the psychosocial environment on brain development in the early years of life
  • Attachment theory and development in infancy

Unit 2: Comprehensive health assessment of the infant.

  • Accepted methods and tools for assessing the health and developmental status of infants and young children
  • Identification of health problems through health screening and child surveillance
  • Early identification of social and environmental factors that affect growth and development
  • Appropriate referral networks to assist the parents to access necessary and appropriate health care or community agencies and other support services

Unit 3: Sleep and settling as a developmental issue

  • Physiology of normal sleep in infancy
  • Techniques to manage unsettled behaviours
  • Assessment of child sleep disorders at the various developmental stages, including consideration of the family dynamics
  • Effects of sleep deprivation on the family unit

Unit 4: Health problems in infancy

  • Nursing management of common health problems in infancy
  • Recognition of the unwell infant
  • Caring for the premature infant in the home environment
  • Identifying risk of harm and protecting children
  • Child safety in infancy
  • Sudden infant death syndrome

Unit 5: Nutrition in the early years.

  • Reflection on own, the community and health professional attitudes towards breastfeeding, formula feeding and weaning
  • Assessment and evaluation of the role of the nurse in the breastfeeding process
  • Initiation and management of breastfeeding including breast feeding difficulties which may arise and appropriate management .
  • The process of weaning and management strategies.
  • Principles and management of formula feeding
  • Healthy eating patterns and nutritional requirements in infancy and early childhood.
  • Introduction and management of solid foods in the diet of infants and young children.
  • The management of food sensitivities, allergies and intolerance.

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Pre-clinical Examination

Intent:

The intent of this assessment item is to assist students to apply knowledge of infant health and wellbeing in response to realistic case studies developed from practice.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A, B and C

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

1.0, 3.0 and 4.0

Weight: 50%
Length:

Two hours

Assessment task 2: Clinical Reflection: Critical Analysis of a Mother-Infant Relationship

Intent:

The intent of this assessment is to provide students with an opportunity to perform a clinically based assessment task, reflect and have feedback on their findings.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A, B, D, E and F

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.0

Weight: 50%
Length:

2000 words

Assessment task 3: Clinical Placement

Intent:

Participation in a clinical placement provides an opportunity to explore the application of theoretical concepts and the development of skills relevant to child and family health nursing practice. The major focus of placement in this subject is to develop confidence and competence in the health assessments of infants and children and infant nutrition (including breastfeeding).

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A, B, C, D, E and F

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.0

Weight: Mandatory task that does not contribute to subject mark
Criteria:

Students develop clinical learning objectives in collaboration with teaching staff as part of their preparation for the placement.

Students will be assessed as satisfactory or unsatisfactory against these objectives and completion of clinical assessment tasks.

Required texts

There are no set texts for this subject. Students will be directed to readings.

Recommended texts

Berk, L. 2013, Child development, 9th edn, Pearson, Boston.

Mares, S. Newman, L. & Warren, B. 2011, Clinical skills in infant mental health: the first three years, 2nd edn, ACER Press, Melbourne.

Sheridan, M. Sharma, A. & Cockerill, H. 2014, From Birth to Five Years: children’s developmental progress, 4th edn, Routledge, UK.

Please refer to UTSOnline for a full list of recommended readings.

References

Australian Association for Infant Mental Health Inc. 2004, Position Paper 1: Controlled Crying

Australian Association for Infant Mental Health Inc. 2006, Position paper 2: Responding to Babies Cues

Berk, L.E. 2013, Child Development (9th ed.). Boston: Pearson.

Brodribb, W. 2011, Breastfeeding management (4th ed.)., Melbourne, Australian Breastfeeding Association.

Mares, S. Newman, L. & Warren, B. 2011, Clinical skills in infant mental health: the first three years, 2nd edn, ACER Press, Melbourne.

National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), 2014, Dietary guidelines for children and adolescents: incorporating the infant feeding guidelines for health workers, Canberra,Commonwealth Department of Health.

National Health & Medical Research Council (NHMRC), 2002, Child health screening and surveillance: a critical review of the evidence, Canberra, AGPS.

Sheridan, M. Sharma, A. & Cockerill, H. 2014, From Birth to Five Years: children’s developmental progress, 4th edn, Routledge, UK.

Other resources

UTS Student Centres
Building 10
Monday to Friday: 9am - 5pm
Tel: 1300 ASK UTS (1300 275 887)

Details for student centres: www.uts.edu.au/current-students/contacts/general-contacts
For other resources/information refer to the Faculty of Health website (www.uts.edu.au/about/faculty-health), the Health Student Guide (www.uts.edu.au/sites/default/files/uts-health-student-guide.pdf) and UTSOnline at: https://online.uts.edu.au/webapps/login/

UTS Library
The Library has a wide range of resources, facilities and services to support you including textbooks, subject readings, old exam papers, academic writing guides, health literature databases, workshops, a gaming room and bookable group study rooms. There is also a team of librarians to help you with all your questions.
W: lib.uts.edu.au, Facebook: utslibrary, Twitter: @utslibrary Tel: (02) 9514 3666

Improve your academic and English language skills
Marks for all assessment tasks such as assignments and examinations are given not only for what you write but also for how you write. If you would like the opportunity to improve your academic and English language skills, make an appointment with the HELPS (Higher Education Language & Presentation Support) Service in Student Services.

HELPS (Higher Education Language & Presentation Support)
HELPS provides assistance with English language proficiency and academic language. Students who need to develop their written and/or spoken English should make use of the free services offered by HELPS, including academic language workshops, vacation intensive courses, drop-in consultations, individual appointments and Conversations@UTS (www.ssu.uts.edu.au/helps). HELPS staff are also available for drop-in consultations at the UTS Library. Phone (02) 9514 9733

Please see www.uts.edu.au for additional information on other resources provided to students by UTS.