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92030 Assisted Reproduction

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Health
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Postgraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

Description

The aim of this subject is to expand on the student's understanding of the fertility pathway. The subject increases the complexity of the concepts inherent in the fertility pathway and further develops the individual toward undertaking or expanding their career in the Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) sector. The application of anatomy, physiology, endocrinology and pharmacological theory is expanded to encompass third-party reproduction, pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, reporting obligations and outcomes of treatment. This subject challenges students by exploring a more complicated pathway to achieving a pregnancy through ART. This is achieved by following a detailed case study approach considering risk management, genetics, and complex pre-implantation genetic diagnosis scenario. By utilising library resources, students further develop skills in researching current evidence, critically appraising information and writing academically.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:
A. Analyse complexities in trajectories of assisted reproduction
B. Identify, plan, implement and evaluate collaborative healthcare for consumers undergoing assisted reproduction
C. Evaluate the outcomes of assisted reproductive technologies including methods to reduce the risk and impact of potential adverse outcomes
D. Recognise the diversity of consumers and families undergoing assisted reproduction and integrate this knowledge into planning and implementing effective healthcare
E. Interpret and discuss genetics as it relates to fertility investigations, interventions and birth outcomes
F. Critically analyse issues associated with third party reproduction

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the following graduate attributes:

  • Translate and integrate evidence to identify and address human fertility needs, to ensure the delivery of quality health care (1.1)
  • Locate and apply knowledge of the physiology and pathophysiology of fertility and infertility to deliver effective and appropriate health care (1.2)
  • Apply context specific knowledge and judgment to the development and delivery of human fertility and assisted reproduction services (3.3)
  • Evaluate current and emerging issues in human fertility and assisted reproduction to improve health outcomes, promote consumer engagement and facilitate evidence-based decision-making (5.1)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

This subject also contributes specifically to the development of the following graduate attributes:

1.1 Translate and integrate evidence to identify and address human fertility needs, to ensure the delivery of quality healthcare

1.2 Locate and apply knowledge of the physiology and pathophysiology of fertility and infertility to deliver effective and appropriate healthcare

3.3 Apply context specific knowledge and judgment to the development and delivery of human fertility and assisted reproduction services

5.1 Evaluate current and emerging issues in human fertility and assisted reproduction to improve health outcomes, promote consumer engagement and facilitate evidence based decision making

Teaching and learning strategies

This subject is taught using a variety of teaching and learning strategies. The strategies used emphasize the active application of knowledge. Learning in this subject will involve self-directed learning activities for each of the modules, attending the two-day workshop at UTS and actively participating in group discussions online. To this end students will be required to read provided material, and source any relevant media in order to prepare for the weekly learning activities and exercises. Resources will be provided on UTSonline.

You will be provided with valuable, on-line discussion stimuli and feedback from teaching staff at the workshops to assist you in developing your learning and understanding your progress in this subject.

Active Learning Modules
Active learning modules are a structured, student centered set of learning activities which aim to develop significant changes in the performance, knowledge, skills, behaviours and attitudes of students. They are used widely in the health sector and are directed at adult learners by ensuring control of the learning is left in their hands. They begin with a subject outline, reading materials and brought to completion by self- review and further research if required. Students should read all assessment tasks at the commencement of the course to guide the student’s further research needs.

Online Discussion
Students read papers, source podcasts/film clips and reflect on the issues presented in order to respond to key questions and engage in debate on these issues with other students in the on-line forum. The discussion should be submitted as a thread in the discussion board of UTSonline.

Face to Face Workshop
Two compulsory workshop days will be held at UTS on 18th and 19th August and will involve discussions, group work and lectures. This strategy will incorporate the development of professional presentation skills for students and encompass theoretical content delivered through guest speaker lectures. Time and advice will be provided to assist students to develop their assessments and learning.

Content (topics)

Donors

  • Known and unknown donors; potential relationship issues
  • Donor sperm, importing sperm

Surrogacy

Interventions in depth

  • Cycles: type of cycles
  • Pre-implantation Genetic Diagnosis
  • Mitochondrial exchange
  • Medication
  • Adverse outcomes

Pregnancy

  • First trimester
  • Types of scans
  • Antenatal care
  • Multiple birth
  • Maternal complications
  • Pregnancy abnormalities
  • Rhesus incompatibility

Assessment

Assessment task 1: On-line Stimulus

Intent:

The intent of this assessment is to engage students in deeper analysis of relevant sub-topics. The provision of sustained analysis and being exposed to the opinions and observations of other students is valuable to the learning experience. In this advanced ART subject, it is not simply participation that is graded, it is the content of the responses that will determine marks.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A, B, C, D, E and F

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

1.1, 1.2, 3.3 and 5.1

Weight: 30%
Length:

300 words per stimulus question

Assessment task 2: Adjuvant Therapy Presentations

Intent:

The intent of the presentation is to prepare students for presenting to the wider ART community and to assess the student’s understanding of evidence based medicine.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A and C

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

1.1, 1.2, 3.3 and 5.1

Weight: 30%
Length:

No more than 10 minutes

Assessment task 3: Case Study

Intent:

Pre-implantation genetic testing provides the opportunity for patients to, as much as possible, prevent serious genetic conditions from passing to the next generation. Technologies currently in use are rapidly changing and staff and patients are struggling to stay abreast of these changes. In this assessment, students will engage in a case study analysis to focus on the complex relationships that exist within an IVF clinic.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A, B, C, D and E

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

1.1, 1.2, 3.3 and 5.1

Weight: 40%
Length:

2500 Words

Minimum requirements

All assessment items must be completed and submitted in order to be eligible to pass this subject.

Required texts

Fritz, M. & Speroff, L. Clinical Gynaecology Endocrinology and Infertility. Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore, USA. 8th Edition. 2011
Available via: http://find.lib.uts.edu.au/?R=OPAC_b3080776

Catt, J & Lingham, E., 2016, Embryology Training Manual and Logbook, SIRT, Parkdale

References

Refer to UTSOnline for access to up to date references for this subject.

Other resources

UTS Student Centre
Building 10
Monday to Friday: 9am - 5pm
Tel: 1300 ASK UTS (1300 275 887)

Details for student centres: www.uts.edu.au/current-students/contacts/general-contacts
For other resources/information refer to the Faculty of Health website (www.uts.edu.au/about/faculty-health), the Health Student Guide (www.uts.edu.au/sites/default/files/uts-health-student-guide.pdf) and UTSOnline at: https://online.uts.edu.au/webapps/login/

UTS Library
The Library has a wide range of resources, facilities and services to support you including textbooks, subject readings, old exam papers, academic writing guides, health literature databases, workshops, a gaming room and bookable group study rooms. There is also a team of librarians to help you with all your questions.
W: lib.uts.edu.au, Facebook: utslibrary, Twitter: @utslibrary Tel: (02) 9514 3666

Improve your academic and English language skills
Marks for all assessment tasks such as assignments and examinations are given not only for what you write but also for how you write. If you would like the opportunity to improve your academic and English language skills, make an appointment with the HELPS (Higher Education Language & Presentation Support) Service in Student Services.

HELPS (Higher Education Language & Presentation Support)
HELPS provides assistance with English language proficiency and academic language. Students who need to develop their written and/or spoken English should make use of the free services offered by HELPS, including academic language workshops, vacation intensive courses, drop-in consultations, individual appointments and Conversations@UTS (www.ssu.uts.edu.au/helps). HELPS staff are also available for drop-in consultations at the UTS Library. Phone (02) 9514 9733

Please see www.uts.edu.au for additional information on other resources provided to students by UTS.