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92026 Reproductive and Sexual Health: A Population Health Approach

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2019 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Health
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Postgraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

This subject aims to further develop students' specialty knowledge around reproductive and sexual health using a health promotion framework. It is aimed at those working or intending to work in reproductive and sexual health such as: clinicians, health care workers, policy advisors, Aboriginal health workers, social researchers and counsellors. Master classes delivered by subject matter experts working in key affected populations provide a strong focus on the current population health approaches that guide strategies and policies to enable optimal evidence-based care. Self-directed learning strategies are used for students to deeply explore issues surrounding the facilitation of care for these key affected populations: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people; people with disability; and people who are same-sex attracted, intersex and gender diverse.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:
A. Appraise the application of a human rights framework for the enhancement of reproductive and sexual health.
B. Evaluate how international, national and state-based reproductive and sexual health strategies have been applied to address the needs of key affected populations.
C. Synthesise approaches to the planning and management of reproductive and sexual health services in relation to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures.
D. Investigate the impact of changing models of disability, community opinion, healthcare policy and service accessibility on the reproductive and sexual health of people with disability.
E. Critique the impact of heterosexism on the reproductive and sexual health of people who are same-sex attracted, intersex, and gender diverse (SSAIGD).

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the following graduate attributes:

  • Are reflective critical thinkers who contribute to practice, policy and research to enhance health care and health outcomes (1.0)
  • Are socially, culturally and ethically accountable and consider health care in a global context (3.0)
  • Embody the professional qualities appropriate to the scope of their role (5.0)
  • Demonstrate professional cultural competency which contributes to the health and wellbeing of Indigenous Australians, inclusive of physical, social, emotional and spiritual wellness (6.0)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

This subject also contributes specifically to the following graduate attributes:

1. Demonstrate reflective critical thinking to enable critical appraisal of current practice, policy and research with the aim to enhance health care and health care outcomes, and transform health (CRITICAL THINKING)

3. Are socially, culturally and ethically accountable when engaging with individuals, families, interdisciplinary teams, communities, organisations and jurisdictions) (ACCOUNTABILITY)

5. Embody the international standard of professional qualities appropriate to the scope of their role in regional, national and global health (PROFESSIONAL QUALITIES)

6. Demonstrate professional cultural competency which contributes to the health and wellbeing of Indigenous Australians, inclusive of physical, social, emotional and spiritual wellness (INDIGENOUS CULTURAL RESPECT)

Teaching and learning strategies

The subject will actively involve students in practical exercises before, during and after the face to face workshops that will build the required skills and knowledge to appraise research and examine service and information provision in reproductive and sexual health. On-line and in class workshop activities will collaboratively engage students in the examination of case studies of actual research and service contexts that will be augmented by presentations in the workshops. Activities and mini lectures in workshops will be provided and facilitated by subject matter experts working with key affected populations including researchers, service providers and consumers who will deliver professional and personal insights on evidence based health care. Students will be required to prepare for face to face workshops through their participation in guided exercises in the weeks before each workshop. The on-line activities will take 3 hours per week and engage students in discussions of real life issues that will also prepare students for the assessment tasks in an iterative manner.

Content (topics)

  • introduction to reproductive and sexual health
  • health promotion
  • reproductive and sexual health rights
  • priority populations
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander reproductive and sexual health care
  • reproductive and sexual health care for people with disability
  • reproductive and sexual health care for people who are SSAIGD
  • public health initiatives and strategies
  • consumer experience

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Analysis of the Research Evidence

Intent:

This task will assess students’ ability to evaluate current evidence relating to reproductive and sexual health care needs of key affected populations.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A, B, C and D

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

1.0 and 3.0

Type: Annotated bibliography
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 30%
Length:

2000 words

Assessment task 2: Reproductive and Sexual Health Program Assessment

Intent:

This case study will assess the student’s ability to explore the planning, organization and services provided by the chosen organization relating to reproductive and sexual health.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

B, C, D and E

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

1.0, 5.0 and 6.0

Type: Case study
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 40%
Length:

2500 words

Assessment task 3: Participation in online learning activities for each of the 8 weeks of this program.

Intent:

This task will assess students’ understanding of the online readings and activities relating to reproductive and sexual health care needs of key affected populations.

[no content]

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A, B, C, D and E

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

1.0, 5.0 and 6.0

Type: Exercises
Groupwork: Group, group and individually assessed
Weight: 30%

Required texts

Readings for each lecture day session are provided in the learning activities and workshop materials, available on UTSOnline.

NB. Announcements will be made on UTSOnline when additional material is posted to UTSOnline but an email will not be sent on each occasion. UTSOnline will also list other readings that form the basis of the lectures or that students may find useful in preparing for their assignments.

Recommended texts

Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW 2014, Early detection and treatment of STIs and BBVs: A manual for improving access to early detection and treatment of STIs and BBVs within Aboriginal Communities in NSW, 2nd ed, AH&MRC, Sydney.

Arabena, K. 2006, ’Preachers, policies and power: the reproductive health of adolescent Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Australia’, Health Promotion Journal of Australia, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 85-90.

Ard, KL. & Makadon, HJ. 2012, Improving the health care of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people: Understanding and eliminating health disparities, The Fenway Community Health Center, Boston, viewed 12 November 2014, <www.lgbthealtheducation.org/wp-content/uploads/12-054_LGBTHealtharticle_v3_07-09-12.pdf>

Australian Clearinghouse for Youth Studies. 2014, Face the facts: Young Australians and sexual health, vol. 1, no. 5, pp. 1-28, viewed 8 October 2014,<www.acys.info/facts>

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2010, Health of Australians with disability: health status and risk factors, bulletin no. 83, cat. No. AUS 132, AIHW, Canberra.

Baum, F. 2008, The new public health, 3rd edn, Oxford, Australia.

Bryant, J., Ward, J., Worth, H., Hull, P., Solar, S. & Bailey, S. 2011, ‘Safer sex and condom use: a convenience sample of Aboriginal young people in New South Wales’, Sexual Health, vol.8, no. 3, pp.378-83.

Department of Health. 2014, Fourth national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander blood-borne viruses and sexually transmissible infections strategy 2014-2017, Department of Health, Canberra, viewed 8 October 2014, <www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/4CBA8EFCE045DFA9CA257BF00020A9D0/$File/ATSI-BBV-STI-Strategy2014-v3.pdf>

Dossetor, D., White, D. & Whatson, L. (eds) 2011, Mental health of children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities: A framework for professional practice, IP Communications, Melbourne.

Eastgate, G. 2011, ‘Sex and intellectual disability: Dealing with sexual health issues’, Australian Family Physician, vol. 40, no.4, pp. 188-191.

Family Planning NSW. 2011, Reproductive and sexual health in New South Wales and Australia: differentials, trends and assessment of data sources, FPNSW, Ashfield.

Fileborn, B. 2012, Sexual violence and gay, lesbian, bisexual, trans, intersex, and queer communities, Australian Centre for the Study of Sexual Assault, Victoria, viewed 12 November 2014, <www.aifs.gov.au/acssa/pubs/sheets/rs3/>

Haswell,M.R., Blignault, I., Fitzpatrick, S. & Jackson Pulver, L. 2013, The social and emotional wellbeing of Indigenous youth: reviewing and extending the evidence and examining its implications for policy and practice, Muru Marri, UNSW, Sydney, viewed 8 October 2014, <www.naccho.org.au/download/aboriginal-health/IYSEWB_ResearchReport_MM.pdf.>

Houtrow, A.J. 2014, ‘Addressing the sexual health needs of youth with disabilities’, AAP News, vol. 35, no.9, pp.15.

Irwin, L. 2007, ‘Homophobia and heterosexism: implications for nursing and nursing practice’, Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol.25, no.1, pp.70-76.

Jones C, & Chivers J (eds). 2011, ‘Promoting health sexual lives for young people with learning difficulties’, in D. Dossetor, D. White, & L. Whatson (eds), Mental health of children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities: A framework for professional practice, IP Communications, Melbourne.

Kuyper, L. & Keuzenkamp, S. 2013, Acceptance of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals in the Netherlands 2013, The Netherlands Institute for Social Research, The Hague, viewed 12 November 2014, <www.scp.nl/english/Publications/Publications_by_year/Publications_2013/Acceptance_of_lesbian_gay_bisexual_and_transgender_individuals_in_the_Netherlands_2013>

Laidsaar–Pwell, R., McCaffery, K., Mather, T. & Juraskova, I. 2014,‘Vaccination decision-making and HPV knowledge: How informed and engaged are young adult HPV vaccine recipients in Australia?’, Journal of Vaccines, vol. 2014, article id 495347, viewed 12 November 2014, < http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/495347>

Larkins, S.L, Page, R.P, Panaretto, K.S, 2007, ‘Attitudes and behaviours of young Indigenous people in Townsville concerning relationships, sex and contraception: the "U Mob Yarn Up" project’, Medical Journal of Australia, vol. 186, no. 10, pp.513-518.

Lupton, D. 2013, Revolting bodies: the pedagogy of disgust in public health campaigns, working paper no. 4, Sydney Health & Society Group, Sydney, viewed 12 November 2014, <http://prijipati.library.usyd.edu.au/bitstream/2123/9110/1/Working%20Paper%20No.% 204%20-%20Disgust%20in%20public%20health%20campaigns.pdf>

Mattews, C.R. & Adams, EM. 2009, ‘Using a social justice approach to prevent the mental health consequences of heterosexism’, Journal of Primary Prevention, vol.30, no.1, pp.11-16.

McNair, R. 2009, ‘Lesbian and bisexual women’s sexual health’, Australian Family Physician, vol.38, no.6, pp.388-393.

Ministerial Advisory Committee on Gay and Lesbian Health 2001, What’s the difference? Health issues of major concern to gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and intersex (GLBTI) Victorians. Rural and Regional Health and Aged Care Services Division Department of Human Services, Melbourne, viewed 12 November 2014, <www.glhv.org.au/files/difference.pdf.>

Neumayer, H. 2013, Changing the Conversation: Strengthening a rights-based holistic approach to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing: A report drafted for Indigenous Allied Health Australia, Australia, viewed 8 October 2014, <http://iaha.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/Changing-the-Conversation-Strengthening-a-rights-based-holistic-approach-to- Aboriginal-and-Torres-Strait-Islander-health-and-wellbeing.pdf.>

Pew Research Center. 2013, A survey of LGBT Americans: Attitudes, experiences and values in changing times, Pew Research Center, Washington, viewed 12 November 2014, <www.pewsocialtrends.org/2013/06/13/a-survey-of-lgbt-americans/>

Purdie, N., Dudgeon, P. & Walker, R. (eds) 2010, Working together: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Mental Health and Wellbeing principles and practice, Commonwealth of Australia, Barton ACT.

Rose, M. & Jackson Pulver, L.R. 2004, ‘Aboriginal health workers: professional qualifications to match their health promotion roles’, Health Promotion Journal of Australia, vol.15, no.3, pp. 240-4.

Russell, D., Bradford, D. & Fairley, C. 2011, Sexual health medicine, 2nd edn, IP Communications, Melbourne.

Strobel, N.A. & Ward, J. 2012, Education programs for Indigenous Australians about sexually transmitted infections and bloodborne viruses, resource sheet no.14 produced for Closing the Gap Clearinghouse, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Canberra, viewed 8 October 2014, <www.aihw.gov.au/uploadedFiles/ClosingTheGap/Content/Publications/2012/ctgc-rs14.pdf.>

Wakefield, M., Loken B. & Hornik, R. 2010, ‘Use of mass media campaigns to change health behaviour’, Lancet, vol. 376, no. 9748, pp.1261-1271.

Ward, J., Bryant, J., Wand, H., Pitts, M., Smith, A., Delaney-Thiele, D., Worth, H. & Kaldor, J. 2014, The goanna survey. Sexual health and relationships in young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: Results from the first national study assessing knowledge, risk practices and health service use in relation to sexually transmitted infections and blood borne viruses, Baker IDI Heart & Diabetes Institute, Alice Springs, viewed 8 October 2014, <www.bakeridi.edu.au/Assets/Files/Final%20Goanna%20Report%20July%202014.pdf.>

Mungabareena Aboriginal Corporation & Women’s Health Goulburn North East. 2008, Using a health promotion framework with an “Aboriginal lens”: making two worlds work, WHGNE, Goulburn, viewed 8 October 2014, <www.whealth.com.au/mtww/documents/MTWW_Health-Promotion-Framework.pdf.>

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