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91559 Bacterial Pathogenesis

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2019 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Science: Life Sciences
Credit points: 6 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

This subject is designed to provide students with fundamental and cutting-edge information on the molecular mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis. This subject looks at the genetic, molecular and biochemical strategies used by bacterial pathogens to cause infection. Host immune responses to bacterial infections are covered as well as the mechanisms that bacterial pathogens use to avoid these responses. Individual mechanisms of pathogenesis by different major pathogens are explored. New approaches in advancing our knowledge of bacterial pathogenesis, such as pathogenomics and functional genomics, are viewed. Antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens is explained with detailed reference to the genetic mechanisms that have led to this problem. Approaches in the discovery of new antibiotics are also examined.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:

1. Evaluate and describe the mechanisms by which bacteria cause disease.
2. Interpret and recognise common themes in bacterial pathogenesis and discriminate between different bacterial pathogens with regard to their molecular mechanism of disease causation.
3. Evaluate and describe host responses to bacterial pathogenesis and relate back to the mechanisms bacteria use to subvert these responses.
4. Identify and explain different mechanisms of antibiotic resistance, including their genetic basis, and relate the affect of antibiotic resistance on society.
5. Analyse and interpret how and when to apply methodological approaches in bacterial pathogenesis.
6. Work professionally in a team environment to provide quality feedback to co-workers.
7. Critically evaluate scientific literature to research a topic in bacterial pathogenesis and present this in written and oral formats.
8. Apply discipline-specific knowledge for constructing evidence-based public health responses and/or policy development.
9. Acquire and use communication skills to transmit knowledge and ideas to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the development of following course intended learning outcomes:

  • An understanding of the nature, practice and application of the chosen science discipline. (1.0)
  • Encompasses problem solving, critical thinking and analysis attributes and an understanding of the scientific method knowledge acquisition. (2.0)
  • The ability to acquire, develop, employ and integrate a range of technical, practical and professional skills, in appropriate and ethical ways within a professional context, autonomously and collaboratively and across a range of disciplinary and professional areas, e.g. time management skills, personal organisation skills, teamwork skills, computing skills, laboratory skills, data handling, quantitative and graphical literacy skills. (3.0)
  • An awareness of the role of science within a global culture and willingness to contribute actively to the shaping of community views on complex issues where the methods and findings of science are relevant. (5.0)
  • An understanding of the different forms of communication - writing, reading, speaking, listening - including visual and graphical, within science and beyond and the ability to apply these appropriately and effectively for different audiences. (6.0)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

1. Disciplinary knowledge and its appropriate application

Your disciplinary knowledge is assessed in the written brief and final examination (Assessment tasks 1 and 4). You will apply knowledge and its application in both tasks, and as a collaborative effort in Assessment task 1.

2. An Inquiry-oriented approach

Your inquiry-oreinted approach is assessed in the written brief (Assessment Task 1). You will research background material that is relevant to this assignment, in the same collaborative group as that for the other two assignments (Assessment Tasks 2 and 3).

5. Engagement with the needs of society

Your engagement with the needs of society is assessed in the written brief, and pamphlet, fact sheet or video (Assessment Tasks 1 and 3). In these tasks, you will pitch your written assignments to the medical profession and the public so that the importance of your research is relevant in the public context.

6. Communication skills

Your communication skills are assessed in the written brief, presentation, and ad pamphlet, fact sheet or video (Assessment Tasks 1, 2 and 3). Your communication skills will be assesed in each of these three tasks, in both written and oral contexts.

Teaching and learning strategies

Lectures: 20 one-hour lectures. These sessions give you an overview of the course content. You will have access to this content in the form of notes, reference material, and videos which can be accessed in UTS Online before each lecture, which you should do in preparation for each lecture session. During the class you will discuss in pairs and small groups and answer questions from and to the lecturer. Lectures are mostly research-oriented and selected from each lecturer's research portfolio.

Workshops: 10 two-hour workshops. These are designed to encourage critical thinking. The material for each session follows on from the related lecture content and any pre-preparation will be flagged by each lecturer, either in the lecture, or in UTS Online, prior to the workshop. You will achieve this outcome by taking part in these active group sessions, discussing problems/cases and applying knowledge and enquiry based thinking to problem sets.

You are expected to monitor UTS Online on a regular basis for information or changes to scheduling, assessment tasks, lectures and tutorial times and locations.

You will get feedback from your peers using the SPARK mid-session online assessment as scores for your work from your peers; and at the end of the session as assessment marks. You also get feedback after your assignment (talk, brief and pamphlet) in the form of a marked rubric, which will be available in UTS Online at the conclusion of each assignment task.

Content (topics)

This subject deals with bacterial pathogens, infectious microorganisms that have afflicted humanity over the recorded history of mankind. The management of these infectious microorganisms is multi-dimensional requiring the input of multiple stakeholders including Researchers, Government, Health Professionals, Industry and the Community. Therefore, when approaching the problem of infectious bacteria – multiple skills and perspectives are required.

Graduates of Bacterial Pathogenesis 91559 should have a holistic understanding of bacterial pathogenesis, not only at the molecular level but also at the socio-political level. Such a task requires the efforts of multiple people and is the reason for the Group Assessment.

There is always a potential for conflict in groups, for instance, a group member failing to follow through on an agreed task(s) or failing to attend meetings. Should conflict arise, the Group Leader, or any individual, should bring this to the attention of the Subject Coordinator.

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Written brief

Intent:

This task assesses the following Graduate Attributes:

1. Disciplinary knowledge and its appropriate application

2. An Enquiry-oriented approach

3. Professional skills and their appropriate application

5. Engagement with the needs of Society

6. Communication skills

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8 and 9

This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):

1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 5.0 and 6.0

Groupwork: Group, individually assessed
Weight: 30%
Criteria:

The marking guide is given in the rubric in UTSOnline.

Assessment task 2: Presentation

Intent:

This task assesses the following Graduate Attributes:

3. Professional Skills and their appropriate application

6. Communication Skills

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

6 and 9

This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):

3.0 and 6.0

Groupwork: Group, group assessed
Weight: 15%
Criteria:

The marking guide is given in the rubric in UTSOnline. Two academics will assess each presentation.

Assessment task 3: Pamphlet, fact sheet or video

Intent:

This task assesses the following Graduate Attributes:

5. engagement with the needs of society
6. communication skills

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

9

This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):

5.0 and 6.0

Groupwork: Group, group assessed
Weight: 15%
Criteria:

The marking guide is given in the rubric in UTSOnline.

Assessment task 4: Final exam

Intent:

This task assesses the following Graduate Attributes:

1. Disciplinary knowledge and its appropriate application

2. An Enquiry-oriented approach

6. Communication skills

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

4, 5, 8 and 9

This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):

1.0, 2.0 and 6.0

Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 40%
Length:

There will be 50 MCQs to be answered in two hours.

Criteria:

Correctness of answers

Quality of reflection of experience of groupwork, lectures, and workshops

Ease of understanding of items and detail communicated

Minimum requirements

  • Any assessment task worth 40% or more requires the student to gain at least 40% of the mark for that task. If 40% is not reached, an X grade may be awarded for the subject irrespective of an overall mark greater than 50.
  • In order to pass this subject, students must obtain at least 50% of the total combined mark available for the assessment tasks.
  • Tutorial attendance is compulsory. Student must attend at least 80% of all tutorials or may be given an X grade.