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89215 Narrative Media Studio: Investigation

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: Design
Credit points: 12 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

Description

In the context of this studio, students build on skills acquired in the previous two Narrative Media studios and the Technology workshops. Students can work with their preferred genre, technique, technology and medium. They are required to propose a central project and line of investigation centred on experimentation and innovation in a specific area of narrative animation. Projects must take a position on some social and culturally relevant issue and explore new possibilities for narrative animation. All students are encouraged to develop their unique personal direction and express their own voice through their work.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. Demonstrate a capacity to position work within a wider social and cultural context displayed through research and perceptive concept development
2. Develop presentation skills that effectively communicate complex ideas, workflows and narratives
3. Demonstrate high level visual communication skills through supporting documentation
4. Demonstrate a capacity to analyse and synthesise complex ideas into compelling and innovative narrative forms.
5. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of cinematic design aesthetics in the creation of mise-en-scène to support an audience’s understanding of narrative.
6. Demonstrate a capacity to construct compelling narratives using a sophisticated approach to editing, assemblage and sound design.
7. Demonstrate a capacity to demonstrate a high level of craft skills and production values across analogue and digital processes
8. Demonstrate a capacity to use critically appraisal and self-reflection to develop, iterate and redirect design ideas
9. Demonstrate a willingness to experiment, take risks, and explore alternative directions

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes:

  • Ability to understand an international context, where Animation is seen as an integral part of cultural production. (A.4)
  • Ability to communicate animation concepts and ideas in a professional and convincing manner (C.3)
  • Ability to produce inspirational responses in the integration of animation learning experiences (I.3)
  • Ability to innovatively use and apply animation technologies and materials (I.4)
  • Ability to demonstrate professional skills in Animation production (P.2)
  • Ability to critically select and utilise both analogue and digital animation technologies (P.3)
  • Ability to locate and document appropriate animation research resources and to make active use of this information (R.1)
  • Ability to reflect and engage in self-critique and critical thinking (R.4)

Teaching and learning strategies

This subject is comprised of weekly lectures and studio-based workshops and tutorials. Students will be participating in individual tutorials, group discussions and team-based activities throughout the semester. Activities will include demonstrations, presentations, visual tasks and exercises, seminars, case studies and external visits. The subject includes active learning experiences where ongoing feedback is provided weekly in on-campus engagements such as interactive lecture sessions, studios and computer labs. It is therefore imperative that students attend all on-campus engagements.

This subject uses the problem-based learning strategy that involves students in researching and developing their own solutions to complex design challenges ensuring that all content and tasks are relevant to current professional practice in a global context. The lecture sessions will provide knowledge relevant to the subject, enabling students to work on their design projects. Added to this, there is an expectation of approx. 10 hours of self-directed practice outside class hours each week.

In the studios, students will work on their design projects. In each studio the lecturer will discuss with the entire group the challenges they are facing with their projects prompting students faced by similar challenges to facilitate collaborative discussions. The lecturer will be reviewing the work weekly and will provide feedback verbally. It is the students' responsibility to record any feedback provided in studio. During presentations students will be expected to actively participate in collaborative peer review feedback exercises.

Grades, marks and a summary of feedback on final design submissions will be provided through Review.

Content (topics)

The subject is organised around an initial research and ideas development period of weekly exercises to strengthen student's conceptual and narrative skills followed by the production of a final project.

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Research and project proposal

Intent:

1. Project proposal communication document with research and development based on a specific brief.

2. Animatic with initial sound design based on a specific brief.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 3, 6, 7 and 9

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

C.3, I.3, I.4, P.2, P.3 and R.1

Type: Project
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 35%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Ability to communicate animation concepts and ideas in a professional and convincing manner. 10 2 P.2
Evidence of risk-taking and experimenting with alternative narrative forms. 15 9 I.4
Strength of concept. Imagination, creativity and originality of visual design. 30 1 I.3
Effective visual communication of concept and narrative ideas appropriate to the brief. 10 3 R.1
Strength and communication of narrative ideas successfully within the animatic. 25 6 C.3
Quality of technical execution of animatic, sound and vision. 10 7 P.3
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Completed project and presentation material

Intent:

1. Fully completed animated film project with full sound design based on specific brief.
2. Supporting media promotion kit based on a specific response to the brief.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 4, 5, 7, 8 and 9

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.4, C.3, I.3, I.4, P.3 and R.4

Type: Presentation
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 65%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Effective Communication of concept, research, cultural context and narrative ideas appropriate to the developed brief. 10 1 A.4
Quality of execution of final Animated Project. 20 7 P.3
Evidence of risk-taking and experimenting with innovative narrative forms. 10 9 C.3
Strength of imagination and narrative concept development. 20 4 I.4
Strength of creativity and originality of visual design and effective communication of narrative ideas within the animated film 30 5 I.3
Ability to critically appraise, develop or redirect design ideas. 10 8 R.4
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Minimum requirements

To pass this subject 80% attendance in all activities (lectures, tutorials) is expected. The listed assessment tasks should be submitted on the due date/time. The combined assessment grades should equal a pass grade or above. Note that grade penalties apply to work considered to be unsatisfactory at interim deadlines. Assessment criteria relate to the learning objectives listed in this document. See briefs for specific details of assessment criteria for each project. To pass an assessment, work submitted should show satisfactory achievement in all learning objectives.

Recommended texts

Ament, V 2009, The foley grail: the art of performing sound for films, games and animation, Focal Press, Elsevier, Boston, USA.

Amidi, A 2006, Cartoon modern: style and design in fifties animation, Chronicle books, San Francisco, USA. Bacher, H 2007, Dreamworlds: production design for animation, Focal Press, Oxford , UK.

Beiman, Nancy. Prepare to Board: Creating Story and Characters for Animated Features and Shorts, Focal Press USA 2007.

Bendazzi, Giannalberto. Cartoons: One Hundred Years Of Cinema Animation, Indiana University Press, Bloomington and Indianapolis, 1994.

Birn, Jeremy. Digital Lighting and Rendering,New Riders, Berkley CA, 2006 Brain, Dave. Drawing for Animation, GDC Publishing, Washington USA, 2006.

Beiman, N 2007, Prepare to Board: Creating Story and Characters for Animated Features and Shorts, Focal Press USA. Bendazzi, G 1994, Cartoons: One Hundred Years Of Cinema Animation, Indiana University Press, Bloomington Indianapolis, USA.

Beauchamp, R 2005, Designing sound for animation, Focal Press, Burlington, USA. Birn, J 2006

Digital Lighting and Rendering,New Riders, Berkley CA. Brain, D 2006

Drawing for Animation, GDC Publishing, Washington USA. Canemaker, J 2001

Walt Disney’s nine old men and the art of animation, Disney Editions, New York, USA. Corsaro, S & Parrott, C 2004

Hollywood 2D Digital Animation: The New Flash Production Revolution, Macromedia Press, USA. Faber, L & Walters H 2004

Animation Unlimited: Innovative Short Films Since 1940, Laurence King Publishing, London. Flaxman, T 2007

Maya Character Modelling and Animation, Charles River Media, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Gray, C 2004

Visualizing research : a guide to the research process in art and design, Ashgate, Burlington, USA. Greenebaum, K and Ronen, B 2004

Audio Anecdotes: Tools, Tips, and Techniques for Digital Audio, A K Peters Ltd, London, UK.

Faber, Liz and Helen Walters. Animation Unlimited: Innovative Short Films Since 1940, Laurence King Publishing, London, 2004.

Flaxman, Tereza. Maya Character Modelling and Animation, Charles River Media, Boston, Massachissets 2007.

Greenebaum, Ken and Ronen Barzel. Audio Anecdotes: Tools, Tips, and Techniques for Digital Audio, A K Peters, Ltd, 2004.

Halas, John. Masters Of Animation, BBC Books, London, 1987.

Halas, John & Whitaker, Harold. Timing for Animation, Focal Press/ Elsevier USA 2002

Hart, John. The Art of the Storyboard. Focal Press/ Elsevier USA 1999

Thinking Animation : Bridging the Gap Between 2D and CG, Thomson Course Technology PTR, USA 2007

Animation unlimited: innovative short films since 1940, Laurence King, London, UK. Halas, J 1987

Masters Of Animation, BBC Books, London, UK. Halas, J & Whitaker, H 2002

Timing for Animation, Focal Press/ Elsevier, USA. Hart, J 1999

The Art of the Storyboard, Focal Press/ Elsevier USA . Jones, A and Oliff, J 2007

Thinking Animation : Bridging the Gap Between 2D and CG, Thomson CourseTechnology PTR, USA. Hooks, E 2003

Acting for animators: a complete guide to performance animation, Heinemann, Portsmouth, USA. Krasner, J.S , 2004

Motion graphic design, fine art animation: principles and practices, Focal Press, Boston, USA. Levy, D.B c2009

Animation development: from pitch to production, Allworth Press, New York, USA. Milic, L 2006

The animation producer’s handbook, Allen & Unwin, Sydney, Australia. Osipa, J 2005

Stop Staring: Facial Modeling and Animation Done Right, Wiley c2010 O'Hailey, T c2010

Hybrid animation : integrating 2D and 3D Assets, Focal Press, Burlington, MA. Pilling, J 2001

Animation: 2D and beyond, Rotovision, Hove, UK. Preibe, K.A . 2011

The Advanced Art of Stop Motion Animation, Boston Course Technology, Boston, USA. Roberts, S 2007

Character Animation in 3D: 2D skills for better 3D, Focal Press, Burlington,USA Zarra, M 2010

Core animation : simplified animation techniques for Mac and iPhone development, Addison Wesley Professional, Toronto, Canada. Robinson,R 2005

Unsung Heroes of Animation, John Libbey Publishing, Hertfordshire, UK. Russett, R & Starr, C. 1988

Experimental Animation: Origins Of A New Art, (Rev. ed.), Da Capo Press, London & New York. Shaw, S 2003

Stop Motion: Craft Skills for Model Animation, Focal Press/ Elsevier USA.

Roberts, Steve Character Animation in 3D, : Use traditional drawing techniques to produce stunning CGI animation, Focal Press/ Elsevier USA 2004

Russett, Robert and Cecile Starr. Experimental Animation: Origins Of A New Art, (Rev. ed.), Da Capo Press, London and New York, 1988.

Shaw, Susannah. Stop Motion: Craft Skills for Model Animation, Focal Press/ Elsevier USA 2003

Tumminello, Wendy. Exploring Storyboarding, Thomson/Delmar Learning, New York, 2005 Webster, Chris.

Animation: The Mechanics of Motion, Focal Press/ Elsevier USA 2005TumminelloW 2005

Exploring Storyboarding, Thomson/Delmar Learning, New York. Webster, C 2005

Animation: The Mechanics of Motion, Focal Press/ Elsevier USA. Wells, P 2008

Re-imaging animation: the changing face of the moving image, Worthing AVA Academia, UK. Whitaker, H 2002

Timing for animation, Focal Press, Oxford, UK. Williams, R 2008

Animation masterclass presents: the animators survival kit animated DVD set, Faber, London. Winder, C 2001

Producing animation, Focal Press, Boston, USA. Withrow, S c2009, Secrets of digital animation : a master class in innovative tools and techniques, Rotovision, Hove, UK.