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88516 Furniture Industry and Development

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: Design
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Undergraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

Description

This studio-based subject is focused on the furniture industry and in developing the student's ability to clearly understand the business aspects of furniture design. The feasibility of production is discussed through project development at various scales of manufacturing. Efforts are made to provide multiple perspectives of the industry from the point-of-view of the designer, the retailer, and the manufacturer. Students are encouraged to examine the factors affecting the process of getting a product into the community. Legal constraints and information on IP protection are discussed. Concerns about marketing is discussed through case studies and site visits to manufacturers and retailers. Students gain a pragmatic and business-oriented approach to the design process.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. Understand the relationship of the whole design community to the professional discipline of furniture design
2. Develop an understanding of the furniture process from sketches to mock-ups through to the manufacturing and retailing of one piece
3. Demonstrate awareness of the various systems involved in the furniture business from small-scale production to manufacturing and distribution processes
4. Critically identify the key issues of feasibility related to furniture prototype development
5. Understand the legal requirements and intellectual property protection issues related to furniture design
6. Demonstrate a clear and progressive work method throughout each project, by keeping a journal, to encourage organisation and logical design process

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes:

  • Effective visual communication skills (C.2)
  • Effective tangible 3D representation (C.3)
  • Demonstration of versatility, curiosity and imagination (I.2)
  • Demonstration of aesthetic sensibility (I.3)
  • Ability to propose, develop and rethink ideas (I.4)
  • Industry specific practical and digital skills (P.1)
  • Accuracy, rigour and care (P.2)

Teaching and learning strategies

Face-to-face sessions will incorporate a range of active learning strategies such as experimentation, mock-ups, modelling, presentations and discussion alongside case studies, field studies, readings and reflection. These will be complimented by independent student engagement with projects through iterative exploration of design propositions, research, development and making.

Content (topics)

This subject will address the following issues and topics:

a) Critical review

b) Manufacturing and materials technologies

c) Working drawings of prototype

d) Production and supervision of prototype

e) Final review

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Concept Development Phase

Intent:

The intention for this task is to guide students through a design development phase for their individual furniture piece.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2 and 5

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

I.2, I.3 and I.4

Type: Design/drawing/plan/sketch
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 40%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Depth of exploration and degree of accuracy shown in the construction of your sketch model series. 34 2 I.2
Level of design resolution achieved in your final sketch model. 33 5 I.4
Degree of aesthetic, ergonomic and functional sensibility achieved in your 1:1 mockup. 33 1 I.3
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Production Phase

Intent:

The intention for this task is to guide students through a production phase for their individual furniture piece.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

2, 3 and 4

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

C.3, P.1 and P.2

Type: Design/drawing/plan/sketch
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 40%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Level of technical accuracy evident in your upholstered object. 34 2 C.3
Level of comfort evident in your final object. 33 4 P.2
Suitability of paper pattern. 33 3 P.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 3: Video Process Journal

Intent:

The intention for this task is to encourage students to record and reflect on their individual design process through creation of a video journal.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1 and 6

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

C.2 and I.2

Type: Journal
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 20%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Depth of design process apparent through use of visual aids (sketches, models, photos, video footage) and commentary. 50 1 I.2
Level of skill and technique evident in the presentation and communication of ideas. 50 6 C.2
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

References

Ashby, M. & Johnson, K. 2002, Materials and Design: The Art and Science of Material Selection in Product
design.
Burlington MA: Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann.

Baker F & Baker K. 2000, Twentieth-Century Furniture, Carlton Books, London.

Böhm, F. 2005, KGID (Konstantin Grcic Industrial Design), Phaidon, London.

Byars, M. 2001, The Best Tables, Chairs, Lights– Innovation and Invention in Design Products for the Home. Rotovision, Switzerland.

Dreyfuss, H. 1967, The Measure of Man: Human factors in design. Whitney Library of Design, New York.

Fiell, C & P. 2001, Chairs. Taschen, Italy, 2001.

Gates, D. & Newton-Cox, A. 2000, The essential guide to upholstery, Murdoch Books, Sydney.

Hallgrimsson, B. 2012, Prototyping and Modelmaking for Product Design, Laurence King, London.

Hanks, D & Hoy, A. 2000, Design for Living – Furniture and Lighting 1950-2000. Flammarion, Paris..

Henry, K. 2012, Drawing for product designers, Laurence King, London.

Lesko, J, 1999, Industrial Design-Materials and Manufacturing Guide. John Wiley & Sons, Canada.
Pheasant, S. T. 1987, Ergonomics: Standards and Guidelines for Designers. British Standards Institution, Great Britain.

Thompson, R. 2007, Manufacturing processes for design professionals, Thames & Hudson, London.