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88006 Textiles: Dye Methods

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: Design
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Undergraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

Recommended studies:

Experience with textile studies is a benefit but is not essential.

Description

This subject introduces students to the principles of dye, colour and resist patterning as they relate to the fashion and textiles industry. Through a series of dye workshops, students are introduced to both traditional and contemporary dye techniques and are encouraged to investigate innovative approaches to colouring and patterning cloth. In studios, students experiment with natural dyes, mordants and commercial dyes including acid and reactive dyes. Students explore rich cultural textile histories including the ancient arts of Japanese Shibori and Indigo dyeing.

This subject introduces students to methods of generating resist textile patterning through techniques such as binding, stitching, tying and pleating. The studio explores natural fibers and fabrics and their relationship to dye techniques. Through material experimentation, students develop textile concepts and colour sensibilities in a sophisticated and individual way. An emphasis throughout the subject is placed on a professional and sustainable print room practice.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. Develop a fundamental understanding of the elements of textile and surface design.
2. Gain knowledge into commercial dyes and their applications in industry.
3. Explore ancient forms of dyestuff and mordants.
4. Experiment with various Shibori techniques together with an understanding of cultural significance in dyes and patterning.
5. Apply dye techniques to various textile surfaces.
6. Demonstrate professional workshop practice and knowledge of Workplace Health and Safety requirements in the Print workshop.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes:

  • Appreciation of the importance of sustainable practices and issues (A.1)
  • Ability to speculate, experiment, challenge boundaries and take risks (I.2)
  • Ability to use technology competently, appropriately and creatively (I.3)
  • Ability to use, acquire and integrate relevant technical skills (P.2)
  • Accuracy, rigour and care (P.5)
  • Ability to undertake in-depth research, including both visual and written forms (R.1)
  • Ability to reflect on practice and research (R.3)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

The term CAPRI is used for the five Design, Architecture and Building graduate attribute categories where:

C = communication and group work

A = attitudes and values

P = practical and professional

R = research and critique

I = innovation and creativity

This subject encourages student learning to develop these graduate attributes. The course content, learning strategies and assessment structure is explicitly designed with these attributes in mind.

Teaching and learning strategies

This subject is delivered in three hours of studio-based learning per week. The activities for this subject are centred on self-initiated learning, reinforcing the independent approach to building knowledge and skills. Students are expected to conduct independent research, attend all classes and follow up on design development required for the following week for each of their individual projects. Students must refer to the subject program for clarification of required assessment and weekly tasks.

STUDIO WORKSHOPS

The three hours of weekly studio contact operates as guided studio-based workshops. During these sessions students will learn how to integrate the principles of textile dye and pattern in their designs. Dye workshops introduce students to creative approaches to colour through experimentation in dyeing. These workshops provide students with opportunities to experiment with methods and techniques used in fashion and textile industries.

Emphasising creative exploration, learning in all facets of studio workshops is crucial to ensuring students deploy the design thinking and technical expertise required in this subject and the field. All students are expected to attend studio sessions, and follow suggested learning patterns and activities. Students are also encouraged to participate actively in the group discussions that occur during the studio sessions.

WORKPLACE HEALTH AND SAFETY (WHS)

An emphasis throughout the subject is placed on a professional and sustainable print room practice. Students are expected to demonstrate professional workshop practice and knowledge of WHS requirements in the Print Room at all time.

RESEARCH

Students are expected to conduct independent research supported by recommended texts accessible via UTS Online. Readings assist students to develop essential content knowledge related to both fashion and textile design principles, textile trends and technical systems. Independent research increases student capacity to experiment and develop confidence in testing, justifying and evaluating new and traditional methods of practice.

ONLINE COURSEWORK

Resources for this subject are located on UTS Online. These are used to support the learning objectives of this subject. A detailed overview of the pedagogy and associated tasks and assessment items are included in the subject documents. In addition, a comprehensive reading list comprising recommended texts is accessible from UTS Online.

From time to time, students will be required to visit industry specialists or related exhibitions to support their learning. Students will be advised in advance and/or exhibitions will be recommended for students to visit for their research.

FEEDBACK

Students will have several opportunities to receive feedback during the subject. The feedback provided will vary in form, purpose and in its degree of formality. Typically, the format of feedback is verbal and /or written. All feedback on assignments will be cross-reference to the briefing/assessment documents.

Formative feedback will be provided during the learning process, typically provided verbally by the subject's teaching staff during studio sessions. It will address the content of work and a student's approach to learning, both in general and more specific ‘assessment orientated’ terms. It is designed to help students improve their performance in time for the submission of an assessment item. For this to occur students need to respond constructively to the feedback provided. This involves critically reflecting on advice given and in response altering the approach taken to a given assessment. Formative feedback may also, on occasion, be provided by other students. It is delivered informally, either in conversation during a tutorial or in the course of discussion at the scale of the whole class. It is the student’s responsibility to record any feedback given during meetings or studio sessions.

Summative feedback is provided in written form with all assessed work. It is published along with indicative grades online at UTS REVIEW. Summative feedback focuses on assessment outcomes. It is used to indicate how successfully a student has performed in terms of specific assessment criteria. Feedback, grades and assessment criteria will also be available to students via the REVIEW assessment system 2-3 weeks after the submisson.

Content (topics)

  • Natural dyes including eucalyptus, madder, onions skins, indigo
  • Shibori techniques
  • Rust, Tannic and Indigo dying/mordants
  • Patterning and resist dye and binding techniques
  • Commercial dyes
  • Disperse dying techniques/ gradation dyeing
  • Fibre/ fabric selection
  • Research of traditional and cultural textiles

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Natural dye research project

Intent:

The intention behind this subject is for students to gain an understanding of natural dye processes and the role of mordants in the natural dye process. Through an intensive workshop into natural dye students will learn how to achieve a variety of colours through natural dyes and mordants. They will experiment with a variety of fibre selections and gain an understanding of the effects of each dye substance according to each different fibre type. They will explore colour and through applied colour exercises gain knowledge in recording technical data and keeping records of dye pattern cards. They will learn professional studio practice and maintaining printroom health and safety practice.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 5 and 6

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

I.3, P.2, P.5 and R.3

Type: Project
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 50%
Length:

Details of submission dye tests will be in assessment 1, document online

Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Demonstrate knowledge gained through an exploration into ancient forms of dyestuff and mordants. 30 1 I.3
Demonstrate knowledge gained through an exploration of dye techniques to various textile surfaces. 30 5 R.3
Demonstrate a detailed documentation and professional presentation of colour dye charts. 30 2 P.2
Demonstrate professional understanding of Health & Saftey workshop procedures 10 6 P.5
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Commercial dye research project

Intent:

By the end of this assessment task students will be familiar with a wide variety of resist techniques and commercial dye processes and be able to create designs that extend the conventions of surface design. Students will have developed an increased understanding of the way patterning cloth can be used to communicate concepts and ideas. This project builds upon existing knowledge through a creative response to research, class discussion and experimentation.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 3, 4, 5 and 6

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.1, I.2, I.3, P.5 and R.1

Type: Project
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 50%
Length:

Please check details in assessment brief on UTS online

Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
In depth research that demonstrates innovative and extensive development of the processes explored. 25 1 I.3
Demonstrate an in depth design investigation into resist patterning throughout the dye experimentation sessions. 25 4 I.2
Experiments, tests, failures - demonstrate innovative design thinking in the variety of colours achieved throughout workshop. 20 5 R.1
Professional documentation of process - demonstrate an ability to reflect and analyse on dye results using photos/diagrams/notes 25 3 P.5
Demonstrate professional understanding of Workplace Health & Saftey workshop procedures 5 6 A.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Minimum requirements

To attend workshop classes and submit each assessment task according to the brief. Students need to attend at least 80% of the workshop classes.

Required texts

Black, Sandy, Eco-Chic, The Fashion Paradox,Black Dog Publishing, London, 2008

Flint, India, Eco Colour, Sustainable Dyes for Fashion

Wada, Y., Rice, K., Barton, M. Shibori: the inventive art of Japanese shaped resist dyeing: tradition, techniques, innovation.

Wells, K. 1997, Fabric Printing and Dyeing, Conran Octupus, London.

Recommended texts

Ash & Dyson. 1970. Introducing Dyeing & Printing, Watson-Guptill Publications, New York

Balfour-Paul, J. c1998, Indigo, British Museum Press, London.

Bawden, J. 1994, The Art and Craft of the Fabric Decorator, Reed Consumer Books, Great Britain.

Belfer, N. 1972, Designing in batik and tie dye, Davis Publications, Worcester, Mass.

Braddock, S., O'Mahony, M. c1998. Techno textiles: revolutionary fabrics for fashion and design, Thames and Hudson, London, England

Braddock, S., O'Mahony, M. c2005. Techno textiles 2: revolutionary fabrics for fashion and design, Thames and Hudson, London, England

De Boer Janet. 1987. Dyeing for Fibres & Fabrics, Kangaroo Press Ltd

Eisha Nakano. 1982. Japanese Stencil Dyeing, Weatherhill, New York, Tokyo

Elliot Marion.1993 Painting Fabric, Henry Holt & Company, New York

Fukui Sadako. 1992. Japanese Indigo Design, Kyoto Shoin

Gentile, T A. 1982, Printed Textiles a Guide to creative Fundamentals, Prentice-Hall, New Jersey.

Isset Ruth, 1998. Colour on Paper & Fabric, Batsford, London

Indigo Prints of China, Nam San Publisher, Hong Kong

Joyce, C. 1993, Textile Design the Complete Guide to Printed Textiles for Apparel and Home Furnishings., Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, N.J.

Johnston Ann. 1997. Colour by accident, Low Water immersion dyeing, Published by Ann Johnston

Kawashima Keiko, Reuter Laurel. 2002. Art Textiles of the World, Vol 2, Japan. Telos Publishing

Korolnik- Andersch Annette. 2002. The colour of Henna, Arnoldsche, Art Publishers

Lesch Alma. 1970, Vegetable Dyeing, Watson-Guptill Publishers, New York

Lloyd Joyce. 1974. Dyes from Plants of Australia & New Zealand. A.H & A.W.Reed Wellington Sydney/London

Lowe John, 1983 Japanese Crafts, John Murray Publishers London

Maile, A. Tie-and-dye as a present day craft, Ballantine Books, New York [1971, c1963]

Mc Carty and McQuaid Matilda Surface and Structure Contemporary Japanese Textiles MOMA 1999

McNamara, A and Snelling,P.Design and Practice for printed Textiles.Oxford,Melbourne.1995

Meller, S.,Elfers, J. 1991, Textile Designs. 200 Years of Patterns for Printed Fabrics arranged by Motif, Colour, Period and Design, Thames and Hudson, London.

Nea, S K. 1971, English Tie-dye: designs, materials, technique, Van Nostrand, Reinhold New York.

Peverill, S. 1988, The Fabric Decorator, Macdonald and Co, London.

Sadao Hibi. 1987, Japanese Detail Fashion, Chronicle Books

Sigrid Wortmann Weltge, 1993, Bauhaus Textiles, Women artists and the weaving workshop,

Thames & Hudson Ltd, London

Simmons Max. 1983. Dyes & Dyeing, Nelson Publishers

Storey, J. 1975, The Thames and Hudson manual of Textile Printing,Thames and Hudson, London.

Tompson frances & Tony. Synthetic Dyeing for Spinners, Weavers, Knitters & Embroiderers. Nelson Publishers

Toshihiko Isa. 1987. Dyeing By Toshihiko Isa, Yobisha Co, Ltd

Von Eztdorf Georgina. 1998, Sensuality, Art & Fabric, Thames and Hudson, London

Wada, Y., Rice, K., Barton, M. Shibori: the inventive art of Japanese shaped resist dyeing: tradition, techniques, innovation.

Wells, K. 1997, Fabric Printing and Dyeing, Conran Octupus, London.

Other resources

Other resources will be provided with each assessment task in class, please check UTS online notice boards