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87631 VC Design Studio: Text and Image 1

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: Design
Credit points: 12 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

This intensive studio subject introduces the core formal and theoretical foundations of visual communication design. A series of studio-based briefs explore the fundamentals of image, text and their interrelationship in professional design practice. In response to these briefs and through secondary and primary research, students develop understandings of form, colour, composition, typography, hierarchy, juxtaposition and sequencing through the practical application of hand and computer skills. These skills are developed alongside an understanding of the dynamic communicative role that image and text play in contemporary visual communication practice.

The lecture series introduces key theoretical understandings of visual communication, embedding the briefs within the larger conceptual framework of practice and visual culture in a contemporary intercultural, global setting. The subject provides practical activities in which students can take ownership of ideas encountered in preparatory reading, research and the lectures, develop skills as a design practitioner with assistance from studio leaders, and collaborate in peer group feedback sessions.

In addition to the subject outline, students are given briefing documents for each of the seven individual projects and their groupings into assessable items. These documents describe how they form the basis of the two portfolio review assessments for the subject.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. Present visual work professionally in print (including written components)
2. Display awareness, sensitivity and respectful behaviour in indigenous contexts
3. Demonstrate ability to use own reflections to inform design decisions (in writing as well as visually)
4. Develop and maintain high level craft skills for the production, presentation and documentation of own work
5. Display awareness of and engage in relevant design communities
6. Understand professional as well as academic ethics and copyright issues
7. Develop relevant insights and arguments from research (in writing as well as visually)
8. Develop the capacity to create designs that respond to their context in formally or conceptually innovative ways
9. Advance ideas through an exploratory and iterative design process

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes:

  • Reflective approaches to design practice (A.3)
  • Cultural awareness required to work sensitively in Indigenous contexts (A.4)
  • Professional and academic visual, oral and written presentation skills (C.1)
  • Capacity to create designs that respond to their context in formally or conceptually innovative ways (I.1)
  • Advance ideas through an exploratory and iterative design process (I.2)
  • Independent development of high level technical and craft skills for the production, presentation and documentation of your work (P.1)
  • Awareness of and/or engagement with the local and global design community (P.2)
  • Understanding of academic and professional ethics, copyright and appropriate acknowledgement of intellectual property (P.3)
  • Development of relevant insights and arguments from research (R.1)

Teaching and learning strategies

Activities for this subject are structured according to the following:

Project Lectures (Tuesdays) act as point of contact for each individual project brief. These lectures will clarify the current topic area, the project you are working on and position both in the broader context of your learning in the subject.

Practice-oriented learning in level 7 Studio Sessions (Tuesdays and Fridays) will give you the opportunity to discuss questions about the weekly topic/content with your peers and with an expert studio leader, to collaborate on practical activities directly relevant to key ideas and to develop your skills as a design practitioner with assistance from your studio leader. Studio sessions will provide you with the opportunity to take ownership of the ideas encountered in preparatory reading, research and the lectures. Your studio leader will facilitate discussion and offer expert insight and direction where needed, but as students you are primarily responsible for the mood of the studio session.

Computer Workshops (Tuesdays) are compulsory. They are designed to both add stand-alone exercises to your assessable portfolio and support the project work in your studio class.

Lecture Series (Fridays) lectures are designed to introduce key theoretical understandings of visual communication, situating you as a professional design practitioner and your work within larger conceptual understandings of practice and visual culture. They will add to your understanding and give your work meaning in a historical and cultural context and the contemporary intercultural global setting.

Portfolio Reviews by an assessment panel mark the middle and end of each semester’s work. In these sessions, you will present the final outcome of each project undertaken in the previous weeks. You will receive a list of assessable items before each session. You will receive feedback on your portfolios by a subject staff member and an industry expert, who will contribute a professional, practice based view; the feedback will be recorded. Each student's presentation and feedback will not exceed 20 minutes.

Pre-work sections for each week are included in the program, describing what you need to do to prepare for and what you need to bring to lectures, studio tutorials and computer workshops. Please read the Pre-work section for the next session at the end of the day’s activities. In general, Tuesday is the day you will discuss the reading you received in the previous week, while Friday is the day you look at the visual form of the reading and work on your analysis of one double page spread from that reading. Each weekly reading and your analysis of its visual form are part of the brief that is the focus of your work at the end of the semester.

  • Pre-Work for weekly subject ‘Lectures’ and lectures in the ‘Lecture Series’. At times, we will ask you to download, read and prepare to discuss readings (found in UTSOnline > documents > All readings); or check the Pinterest Board that runs parallel to the ‘Lecture Series’ (http://pinterest.com/textimage1/) to prepare input and for cross referencing.
  • Pre-Work for ‘Studio Tutorials’. Download all project briefs for the subject from UTSOnline. Please bring the following each week: photocopy/printing card, A3 layout paper (e.g. 70gsm Artec bond layout pad), metal ruler, compass or set square, A4 paper for notes, detail/butter paper, glue, tape, thin line black pen/marker, thicker black pen/marker, ink, brushes, sharp scalpel/knife, scissors, calligraphy pen e.g. Speedball C4 (optional).
  • Pre-Work for ‘Computer Tutorials’. Please bring the following: photocopy/printing card, USB thumb drive or any kind of portable HD Apple Mac compatible hard disk (recommended) to copy to and from the lab machines. You will need to take notes and develop sketches in the computer workshops as well. Please ensure that you have appropriate materials with you.

Content (topics)

• typography • manual skills • typographic sensitivity • similarity and contrast • noticing • image experimentation • image generation • design fundamentals • typographic rules • basic layout • reflective practice • design system and structure • design process • image text relation • typographic hierarchy • visual elements of design • design principles

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Portfolio Review 1

Intent:

Presentation and assessment of projects that have been undertaken in the weeks leading up to the Review (a list of projects being reviewed is provided prior to the session). The purpose of Portfolio Review 1 is to formally provide students with grades and feedback on the outcomes of work in Projects 01–03. The feedback at the mid-way point of the semester will give students an indication of their progress in achieving the subject learning outcomes to guide improvement of the outcomes in Portfolio Review 2.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 4, 5 and 8

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.4, C.1, I.1, P.1 and P.2

Type: Portfolio
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 50%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Professional visual and written presentation of portfolio outcome (including general presentation, clarity of organisation, typography, written expression, spelling and grammar) 12 1 C.1
High level technical and craft skills for the production, presentation and documentation of the work in portfolio folder (that includes manual cutting and pasting skills, assembling and general care) 12 4 P.1
Demonstrated awareness of the appropriate design community and their contemporary as well as historical work practices and theories (as evidenced in visual precedents in portfolio, written annotations, and/or final outcome) 12 5 P.2
Capacity to develop design outcomes - visually and conceptually - that respond to their context in innovative ways (outcomes appropriate to technical and conceptual stage in design development) 12 8 I.1
Demonstrated cultural awareness and sensitivity in work situated in an indigenous context 13 2 A.4
Capacity to develop design outcomes - visually and conceptually - that respond to their context in innovative ways (outcomes appropriate to technical and conceptual stage in design development) 13 8 I.1
High level technical skills in the use of typography (typesetting rules, spacing, type detailing and technical execution in all copies of outcomes) 13 4 P.1
Creativity in formal and conceptual outcome for solving the brief (aesthetics, unique solution, and creativity within its defined limits) 13 8 I.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Portfolio Review 2

Intent:

Presentation and assessment of projects that have been undertaken in the weeks leading up to the Review (a list of projects being reviewed is provided prior to the session). The purpose of Portfolio Review 2 is to formally assess the outcomes of work in Projects 04–08, building on achieving subject learning outcomes evidenced since Portfolio Review 1.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.3, C.1, I.1, I.2, P.1, P.2, P.3 and R.1

Type: Portfolio
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 50%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Professional visual and written presentation of portfolio outcome (including general presentation, clarity of organisation, typography, written expression, spelling, and grammar) 9 1 C.1
High level technical and craft skills for the production, presentation and documentation of your work in the portfolio (including manual pre-work, digitalisation and refinement of final outcome - digital as well as physical) 9 4 P.1
Capacity to develop design outcomes - visually and conceptually - that respond to their context in innovative ways (outcomes appropriate to technical and conceptual stage in design development) 9 8 I.1
Ability to employ an exploratory and iterative design process and curate outcomes of that process in portfolio hand-in (logo categories and outcomes, and selection process to final) 9 9 I.2
Application of relevant insights and arguments from research (logotype category examples and demonstrated link to own outcomes) 9 7 R.1
Demonstrated understanding of academic and professional ethics, copyright and appropriate acknowledgement of intellectual property (including cultural awareness and sensitivity towards indigenous cultures and artefacts) 9 6 P.3
Capacity to develop design outcomes - visually and conceptually - that respond to their context in innovative ways (outcomes appropriate to technical and conceptual stage in design development) 9 8 I.1
Demonstrated advancement of ideas through an exploratory and iterative design process as demonstrated in ‘Monoprinting’ and ‘Generative Design’ outcomes 9 9 I.2
Demonstrated awareness of relevant local and global design communities in precedent work for both outcomes (‘Monoprinting’ and ‘Generative Design’) 9 5 P.2
Development of relevant insights and arguments from research (complete and appropriately marked-up pages) to develop a professional design outcome 9 7 R.1
Demonstrated reflective approach to design practice and successful use of those reflections as basis for all outcomes (ongoing engagement with reflective writing prompts and a clear link to all the project work in the subject) 10 3 A.3
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes