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86222 Communication and Construction: Synthesis

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: Architecture
Credit points: 6 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

This subject is the final in a series of skill-based, communication and construction documentation subjects. It closes and consolidates three years of learning in technical, graphic and construction representation techniques through interior architecture practice.

Context subjects explore communication and construction through orthographic drawing and construction practice. This subject continues to interrogate these codes of production through the development of a drawing package suitable for tendering a small interior architecture project. The drawing package is of industry standard consisting of a numbered drawing index and corresponding drawings of suitable scale and complexity for a builder to price an interior fit out. Skills developed in this subject include observation and the production of measured drawings, the development of integrated and cross-referenced architectural drawings including plans, internal elevations, joinery, lighting, electrical and data layout, furniture and material schedules, and signage.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. Demonstrate understanding of Interior Architecture industry standard documentation.
2. Identify and study Interior Architecture construction and processes related to tendering.
3. Identify, select and specify a range of Interior Architecture technologies including lighting, joinery, wall, floor and ceiling finishes, furniture and signage.
4. Produce a numbered drawing package integrating sufficient scale and complexity to tender.
5. Actively collaborate in the management and production of documents, either individually or collectively.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes:

  • Ability to take autonomous responsibility for actions and decisions (A.1)
  • Ability to work cooperatively as part of a team, initiate partnerships with others, take a leadership role when required and constructively contribute to peer learning and critique (C.1)
  • Ability to initiate and execute meaningful self-directed iterative processes (I.3)
  • Ability to apply and utilise appropriate communication techniques, knowledge and understanding to enable practical applications in spatial design (P.1)
  • Ability to rigorously explore, apply and extend multiple representational techniques (P.2)
  • Ability to apply and deploy disciplinary learning, with a continuing commitment to professional development (P.3)
  • Ability to independently select and apply appropriate research methodologies to carry out investigative study (R.1)
  • Ability to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of interior and spatial design precedent and to contextualise one's work within the extended discipline (R.3)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

The term CAPRi is used for the five Design, Architecture and Building faculty graduate attributes. The course content, learning strategies and assessment structure is explicitly designed with these attributes in mind.

C = communication and groupwork

A = attributes and values

P = practical and professional

R = research and critique

I = innovation and creativity

Teaching and learning strategies

Context: Synthesis is studio based. It consists of 3-hour weekly studio sessions and a shared interactive lecture series. Studio sessions are composed of specially designed, task-specific exercises that encourage interactive and collaborative learning experiences through student/tutor and peer-to-peer dialogues. During the semester, students are presented with core theoretical and practical components essential in satisfying the 5 subject learning objectives. The series includes practitioner and expert presentations open to all years to encourage a highly engaged learning experience throughout the course.

Studio sessions are forums for ongoing tutor feedback peer feedback, the exchange of ideas and knowledge, and the production of subject specific material. Formative feedback is designed to help students improve their performance in time for the submission of an assessment item. For this to occur students need to respond constructively to the feedback provided. This involves critically reflecting on advice given and in response, altering the approach taken to a given assessment. Formative feedback may also, on occasion, be provided by other students. It is delivered informally, either in conversation during a tutorial or in the course of discussion at the scale of the whole class. It is the student’s responsibility to record any feedback given during meetings or studio sessions.

Context uses an inquiry-based learning strategy that engages students in the research and development of their own individual/group understanding of the learning objectives. Therefore, student attendance in all classes is required in order to facilitate a proper working environment where the exchange of ideas and knowledge can take place. All subject documents, content specific information and communication will occur through UTSOnline.

Summative feedback is provided in written form with all assessed work. It is published along with indicative grades in REVIEW through UTSOnline. Summative feedback focuses on assessment outcomes. It is used to indicate how successfully a student has performed in terms of specific assessment criteria.

Content (topics)

The subject addresses the following issues and topics:

1. Research and analysis specific to producing Interior Architecture documentation

2. Construction Principles of Interior Architecture

3. The production of a numbered drawing package for tendering

4. Interior Architecture Technologies

5. Materials, Lighting and Furniture specifications

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Assessment Task 1

Intent:

The subject is structured in three parts to reflect the way documentation is produced in Industry. Part 1 is focused on the production of plans and four internal elevations.

  • A100 Site Plan: 1:200
  • A101 Floor Plan: 1:50
  • A102 Reflected Ceiling Plan 1:50
  • A103 Lighting Plan 1:50
  • A104 Data & Electrical Plan 1:50
  • A200 Elevation _ Façade 1:50
  • A201 Internal Elevations 1/2 1:50
  • A202 Internal Elevations 3/4 1:50
  • A402 Lighting Schedule

Student feedback will be provided weekly through reviews, studio discussion, drawing critique and mark up sessions. Students have the opportunity to self assess using REVIEW where self-assessment can be viewed in relation to tutor feedback. Feedback on REVIEW is generally available within 7-10 days of submission.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 3 and 5

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

C.1, P.1, P.2 and P.3

Type: Project
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 40%

Assessment task 2: Assessment Task 2

Intent:

Assessment 02 is a continuation of A01. Stage two is focused on a greater level of detail in Detailed Joinery and the selection of materials and furniture.

  • A300 Detailed Joinery 01 _ Counters 1:20 / 1:5
  • A301 Detailed Joinery 02 _ Banquettes 1:20 / 1:5
  • A302 Detailed Joinery 03 _ Shelving 1:20 / 1:5
  • A400 Materials Schedule
  • A401 Furniture Schedule

Student feedback will be provided weekly through reviews, studio discussion, model-making critique and technique advice. Students have the opportunity to self assess using REVIEW where self-assessment can be viewed in relation to tutor feedback. Feedback on REVIEW is generally available within 7-10 days of submission.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

2, 3 and 4

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

C.1, I.3, P.1 and R.3

Type: Project
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 30%

Assessment task 3: Assessment Task 3

Intent:

Assessment Task 3 extends upon assessments 1 and 2. It is focussed on the resolution of the numbered and fully detailed documentation of professional standard.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 3 and 4

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.1, P.1, P.3 and R.1

Type: Project
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 30%
Criteria:

Deliverables for Assessment Task 3 are extensions from A01 and A02.

Each drawing package will include:

  • cover sheet with index
  • title blocks on each sheet
  • checking and refinement
  • addition of finishes codes
  • final printing and collation
  • A303 Mystery Sheet _ Custom Feature 1:20 / 1:5

Student feedback will be provided weekly through reviews, studio discussion and advice on graphic representation techniques. Students have the opportunity to self assess using REVIEW where self-assessment can be viewed in relation to tutor feedback. Feedback on REVIEW is generally available within 7-10 days of submission.

Minimum requirements

  1. The Faculty of DAB expects that students attend 80% of classes for all enrolled subjects. Adequate achievement of subject criteria is difficult if classes are not attended. Attendance is mandatory where assessment tasks are to be presented during class.
  2. Pursuant to UTS rule 2.5.1 – students who do not satisfy attendance requirements may be refused permission to be considered for assessment by a Responsible Academic Officer.

Recommended texts

Soriano, Federico. (2014) "Grammaticals". Madrid, Fisuras.

Evans, R. (1997). Translations from drawing to building. MIT Press.

Ware, C. (2012). Building stories. New York: Pantheon Books.

Tsukamoto, Y., & Kaijima, M. (2007). Graphic anatomy. Tokyo: TOTO Shuppan.

Atelier Bow-wow (2014) - Graphic Anatomy 2. Tokyo: TOTO Shuppan.

Kaijima, M., & Kuroda, J. (2001). Made in Tokyo. Tokyo: Kajima Inst. Publ.

Yoshida, N. (2012). House genealogy, Atelier Bow-Wow: All 42 houses. Tokyo: Shinkenchiku-sha.

Gameren, D. (2014). Stijlkamers = Interiors on display. Rotterdam: Nai010 uitgevers/.

Ishigami, J. (2010). Junya Ishigami: Another scale of architecture. Kyoto: Seigensha Art Publishing.

Levene, R., & Cecilia, F. (2015). Lacaton et Vassal: 1993 2015; horizonte post-mediatico, post-media horizon. Madrid: El Croquis.

20 / Narrative Winter 13. (2013, December 13). Retrieved July 1, 2015, from http://www.mascontext.com/20-narrative-winter-2013/

Pyo, M., & Kim, S. (2012). Architectural and program diagrams. Berlin: DOM.

Colomina, B., & Preciado, B. (2006). La domesticidad en guerra. Actar.

Di Mari, A. (2013). Operative design: a catalogue of spatial verbs. BIS Publishers.

Bow-Wow, A. (2001). Pet Architecture Guide Book. World photo Press.

Lim, C. J., & Liu, E. (2011). Short Stories: London in two-and-a-half dimensions. Routledge.

Moussavi, F., & Kubo, M. (Eds.). (2009). The function of form. Actar.

Moussavi, F., & Kubo, M. (Eds.). (2006). The function of ornament. Actar.

Moussavi, F., & Kubo, M. (Eds.). (2006). The function of Style. Actar.

Ibelings, H., Rijk, T., Pontzen, R. and Parry, R. (2015). Rob Parry. Amsterdam: The Architecture Observer.

Design Parts Collection In Japanese Traditional Style Architecture. (2015). Tokyo: Design Book.

Other resources

LEARNING RESOURCES

Student support and other information

UTS Library

http://www.lib.uts.edu.au

Library Subject guide link

http://www.lib.uts.edu.au/information/subject_guides/design/interior_design.html

UTS-Online

http://online.uts.edu.au

The BELL (Becoming an Effective Lifelong Learner)

http://www.bell.uts.edu.au/bells/

The ELSSA (English Language and Study Skills Assistance) Centre

http://www.uts.edu.au/div/elssa/

Mathematics, Statistics and Introductory Computer skills

http://it.uts.edu.au/activities/msc/

Computer logins, passwords and computer labs

Contact the ITD (Information Technology Division) help desk if you are having difficulty logging on to the UTS Website, your UTS Email or UTSOnline. Phone: 02 9514 2222 Email: helpdesk@uts.edu.au

Organising your study, motivating and managing yourself

Contact Student Services: http://www.uts.edu.au/div/ssu/index.html