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83923 Research: Fashion Concept Lab

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: Design
Credit points: 12 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

This subject requires students to research a project that supports their personal design philosophy, or interest, within a fashion and textile design field. The in-depth design project provides a structured experience for students by offering a self-directed design project that combines theoretical and conceptual research methodologies and an expanded approach to fashion practice.

The subject is supported by a series of interactive lectures, tutorials, demonstrations and workshops that address current fashion and textile design issues. The interactive lecture series introduces students to methods of practice, visualisation and making, expanded fashion practices, both globally as well as nationally, and includes visits from industry sponsors. The workshops offer a series of tasks and demonstrations which allow the students to apply an explorative and experimental approach to their work.

Design studios offer an opportunity for students to gain formative feedback from the studio lecturers across both technical, design and textiles. The subject culminates in students utilising the skills they have developed throughout the session to create a final body of experimental design work that documents the research and design process. This final presentation is accompanied by critique from an academic panel.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. Demonstrate an understanding of how theory and design practices are interwoven.
2. Research, analyse and assimilate data into innovative and effective outcomes.
3. Demonstrate an understanding of designing for an international fashion market.
4. Effectively communicate a systematic approach to convert design ideas into a finished product.
5. Effectively demonstrate a high level of competency in managing time, communicating visual and verbal concepts.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes:

  • Advanced communication skills for industry professional context (C.1)
  • Advanced aesthetic sensibility (I.1)
  • Advanced engagement with professional and global fashion industry practices (P.2)
  • Appreciation of global business and marketing frameworks and processes (P.3)
  • Ability to use a variety of research methodologies (R.3)

Teaching and learning strategies

This subject is delivered in weekly sessions between Weeks 2 to 12 in the form of one-hour interactive lectures, 2.5-hour technical workshops, and 2.5-hour design studios. The activities for this subject are centred on self-initiated learning. Students are expected to conduct independent research, attend all lectures and tutorials and follow suggested progress patterns for each of their individual project.

This subject incorporates a range of teaching and learning strategies which includes; interactive lectures, discussions, demonstrations, studio activities, design thinking and making. Each class is complemented by prior reading, research and reflection on studio work, collaborative and individual tasks. Collaborative tasks involve working in a group to explore how diverse research processes and methodologies can be used to create an expanded fashion practice.

Lecture and studio activities include, visual and technical research, illustration, photography, mixed media. Studios offer students an opportunity to have formative feedback from studio lectures and peers. The iterative process of conceptualising and realising the project outcomes are documented in an A3 journal, which demonstrates visual and written research, creative ideas and design development. The final panel presentation offers formative and summative feedback to students on their project outcomes.

There is opportunity for students to undertake a Global Studio as a part of the project and travel overseas to work with specialist technicians and crafts people within the Asian region.

Content (topics)

This subject is facilitated through a combination of lectures, workshops and student supervision. Students are encouraged to become independent researchers and designers by working individually on proposed projects in consultation with a specialist supervisor. The subject contains:

  1. Workshops and tutorials will assist in the development of a personal aesthetic and design philosophy
  2. The development of a design project, which is informed and underpinned by a conceptual and aesthetic research
  3. Design decisions and complex problem solving
  4. The opportunity for students to develop conceptual and experimental design outcomes
  5. Critical analysis and reflection throughout research inquiry and the design process.

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Visual Research Journal and Design / Shape Development / Conceptual Garment Proposal

Intent:

Start of development of a body of visual and conceptual research work that conveys a thematic and aesthetic viewpoint

The assessment task project brief can be downloaded from UTSonline/subject documents.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2 and 5

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

C.1, P.2 and R.3

Type: Design/drawing/plan/sketch
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 50%
Criteria:

1. Visual research & shape development journal (60%)

  • Easy to read, visually dynamic and content rich;
  • Demonstrates an understanding of how research informs design process;
  • Engages with issues that relate to contemporary global fashion design practices;
  • Illustrates how theoretical ideas can be translated visually;
  • Demonstrates an effective analysis of research data and assimilate findings into an innovative and creative proposal.

2. Conceptual outfit (30%)

  • An exploration of the relationship between garment and the body;
  • Innovative silhouette and shape detailing;
  • An ability to translate research into innovative fashion proposals;
  • An experimental exploration of shape, volume and form.

3. Time Management (10%)

The students’ time in the studio needs to demonstrate professional approach to time management and communication.

Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Visual Research & Shape Development Journal 60 2 R.3
Conceptual outfit 30 1 P.2
Time management 10 5 C.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Conceptual Design Proposal

Intent:

Shape and form development

Start of development of a body of visual and conceptual research work that conveys an exploration into how the thematic and aesthetic viewpoint is developing in reference to Shape, form, and its relationship to the body.

The assessment task project brief can be downloaded from UTSonline/subject documents.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 3, 4 and 5

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

C.1, I.1 and P.3

Type: Project
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 50%
Criteria:

1. Six look Conceptual Fashion Proposal (30%)

  • Effectively communicate the project concept and proposal with a consideration for layout and visual design.
  • An ability to translate research into innovative fashion proposals, through concept material and technique.
  • An understanding of how theory informs design process.
  • An engagement with issues that relate to contemporary fashion practice.
  • The fashion illustrations and technical drawings need to be clear, and indicative of concept and theme using an appropriate medium.

2. The three outfits (60%)

  • Demonstrate the relationship between garment and the body.
  • Express innovative silhouette and shape detailing.
  • Demonstrate an ability to translate research into innovative fashion proposals, through concept material and technique.
  • Demonstrate an experimental exploration of shape, volume and form, and appropriate construction finishes, and quality of make.
  • Colour palette shows innovation and experimentation with regards to colour combinations; and is appropriate towards collection.
  • Fabric selection and development reflects theme and speaks into concept development.

3. Presentation ( 10%)

The students’ oral presentation needs to be clear and articulate in conveying fashion proposal.

Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Conceptual fashion portfolio 30 1 C.1
Conceptual fashion outfits, design 20 2 I.1
Conceptual fashion outfits, construction 30 4 P.3
Presentation 10 5 C.1
Conceptual fashion outfits, design 10 3 I.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Minimum requirements

The faculty of DAB expects students to attend 80% of all classes for all enrolled subjects. Achievement of the subject's aims is difficult if classes are not attended. Where assessment tasks are to be presented personally in class, attendance is mandatory.

Pursuant to UTS rule 3.8.2 students who do not satisfy attendance requirements may be refused permission by the Responsible Academic Officer to be considered for assessment for this subject.

Required texts

Fashion Theory, Berg Pub, Oxford (an electronic version of this journal is available on the UTS library website)

Recommended texts

UTS Coursework Assessment Policy and Procedures Manual.

Armstrong, H. 1995, Patternmaking for Fashion Design, Harper & Row,

Relis, N. 1993, Draping For Fashion Design, Prentice Hall,

Breward, C. 1995, The Culture Of Fashion, St. Martin's Press,

Davis, F. 1992, Fashion, Culture, And Identity, University of Chicago Press, Chicago

Jaffe, H. 1997, Fashion Theory, Berg Publications, Oxford,

McRobbie, A. 1999, In The Culture Society, Routledge,

Additional references to be recommended by supervisor.

Other resources

Online resources:

Brené Brown, The Power of Vulnerability, TEDX Houston, June 2010

https://www.ted.com/talks/brene_brown_on_vulnerability?utm_source=tedcomshare&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=tedspread

Brené Brown, Listening to Shame, TED2012, March 2012

https://www.ted.com/talks/brene_brown_listening_to_shame?language=en?utm_source=tedcomshare&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=tedspread

Brené Brown, Why Your Critics Aren't The Ones Who Count, December 2013

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8-JXOnFOXQk

Isaac Mizrahi, Fashion and Creativity, TED Talks February 2008

https://www.ted.com/talks/isaac_mizrahi_on_fashion_and_creativity

Ken Robinson, Do Schools Kill Creativity?, TED Talks, February 2006

https://www.ted.com/talks/ken_robinson_says_schools_kill_creativity?language=en

Tim Urban, Inside the mind of the Master Procrastinator, TED Talks, February 2016

https://www.ted.com/talks/tim_urban_inside_the_mind_of_a_master_procrastinator?language=en