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83621 Studio: Foundations in Patternmaking and Construction 1

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: Design
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Undergraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

This subject introduces students to the principles of pattern making and garment construction, as a means to begin interpreting fashion design ideas into realisable garment outcomes. Students learn how to translate fashion drawings into flat pattern form, and to translate flat pattern pieces into three-dimensional form. In this subject students investigate material qualities essential to begin creating accurate and professional fashion garments, and learn industry techniques used for creating and interpreting production garment patterns. Students are introduced to garment block patterns, and investigate essential garment forms, and details applicable to these forms. Students undertake accreditation and OH&S training relevant to working in the specialised industrial sewing workshop.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. Demonstrate self-directed learning and decision-making in pattern making and construction
2. Demonstrate appropriate levels of technical skills for patternmaking and garment construction
3. Develop accuracy, rigour and care for patternmaking and construction documentation
4. Develop an understanding of methods to enable accuracy, rigour and care when constructing finished patterns and garments
5. Utilise a variety of research methods for patternmaking and construction including visual research

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes:

  • Demonstrated self-directed learning and self-initiated problem-solving (P.1)
  • Ability to use, acquire and integrate relevant technical skills (P.2)
  • Accuracy, rigour and care (P.5)
  • Capacity to interpret complex ideas (R.4)

Teaching and learning strategies

2-hour Patternmaking Studio and 2-hour Construction Workshop per week.

This subject is offered face-to-face and incorporates a range of teaching and learning strategies including demonstrations, studio activities, hands-on making, and discussion. These are complemented by preparation activities including online readings and videos, independent research, reflections on studio tasks and practical activities.

Collaborative tasks involve working with other students in specific studios, and contributing towards weekly discussions and observations about garment components and details.

The studio tasks develop week-to-week, with student participation outside of the studio. Informal feedback on week-to-week tasks is provided in studio by tutors, and requires students to present work in progress for feedback and constructive criticism. The Informal feedback assists students in progressing weekly in the subject, and achieve assessment objectives.

Construction workshop involves working with industrial sewing and pressing machinery, and developing sample techniques for garment making. Patternmaking studio involves the application of specialist technical skills related to developing and completing patternmaking construction drafts and pattern exercises, including representing these thorugh 1/3 scale pattern techniques. All workshop activities include; pre-reading, visual and technical research, sketching, photography and documentation through note taking and additional research.

Content (topics)

Studios are practice based, with separate patternmaking and construction workshops. Assessments are project based, combining in-class demonstrations and individual learning.

  1. Understand garment pattern blocks and how they relate to the human body
  2. Adapt patternmaking skills to achieve specific outcomes
  3. Identify specific garment features and pattern shapes in order to construct them
  4. Demonstrate basic methods of garment construction and finish variations
  5. Operate workshop machinery safely
  6. Develop an understanding of the different methods of construction for specific fabric types
  7. Sourcing and referencing of information.

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Patternmaking Skirt Foundation

Intent:

Assessment 1 Brief can be downloaded from UTSOnline/Subject Documents. This includes complete information for this assessment. Assessment criteria is available at any time in the REVIEW assessment system at https://uts.review-edu.com/uts/ and you are encouraged to engage with them by self-assessing your work prior to the deadline for this task.

This assessment task introduces students to methods of flat patternmaking, with a focus on the skirt. Students will learn new terminology relevant to patternmaking for fashion industry practice. Principles and tools of flat patternmaking will be introduced, and assessed through practical examples, resulting in a submitted garment pattern.

Students are introduced to the patternmaking research journal, which forms part of this assessment.

In-class progress is taken into consideration for assessment, involves students demonstrating progress in-class week-to-week, responding to feedback, and undertaking preparatory activities.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2 and 3

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

P.1, P.2 and R.4

Type: Design/drawing/plan/sketch
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 30%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Finished pattern demonstrates appropriate levels of patternmaking skills including complete labelling, notches, and all pieces 33 2 P.2
Patternmaking research journal includes the most important images and annotations for weekly tasks including sourced imagery. 33 3 R.4
Participation in class including preparation for weekly classes, and in-class progress 34 1 P.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Construction Fashion Skirt

Intent:

The assessment project brief can be downloaded from UTSOnline/Subject Documents. This includes complete information for this assessment. Assessment criteria is available any time in the REVIEW assessment system at https://uts.review-edu.com/uts/ and you are encouraged to engage with them by self-assessing your work prior to the deadline for this task.

This assessment task introduces students to methods of construction for fashion garments with a focus on a fashion skirt. Students will learn new terminology relevant to construction for fashion industry practice, to assist the process of fashion design. Students will learn new processes using industrial machinery in the sewing workshop, and demonstrate understanding of foundational methods of garment making for fashion. Assessment is made through practical samples, resulting in the submission of a complete fashion garment.

Students are introduced to research methods for garment construction, and the construction research journal, which forms part of this assessment.

In-class progress is taken into consideration for assessment, and involves students demonstrating progress in-class week-to-week, responding to feedback, and undertaking preparatory activities.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2 and 5

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

P.1, P.2 and R.4

Type: Design/drawing/plan/sketch
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 30%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Participation in class including preparation for weekly classes, and in-class progress 33 1 P.1
Fashion Skirt demonstrates appropriate levels of technical skills reflecting your understanding of construction techniques in the finished outcome. 33 2 P.2
Construction research journal includes the most important notes and images, which demonstrate your understanding of weekly tasks, and supplementary research. All samples included. 34 5 R.4
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 3: Patternmaking and Construction Fashion Top

Intent:

The assessment project brief can be downloaded from UTSOnline/Subject Documents. This includes complete information for this assessment. Assessment criteria is available at any time in the REVIEW assessment system at https://uts.review-edu.com/uts/ and you are encouraged to engage with them by self-assessing your work prior to the deadline for this task.

This assessment is focused on the 'Fashion Box Top' and is linking the foundational skills of patternmaking and construction to create a fashion garment. This assessment task continues to develop foundational patternmaking and construction skills, supported by research journal methods development, construction samples, and patternmaking exercises. Assessment is made through practical application of patternmaking and construction skills, to develop accuracy, consistency and rigor in the finished garment, pattern and journal outcomes.

In-class progress is taken into consideration for assessment, and involves students demonstrating progress in-class week-to-week, responding to feedback, and undertaking preparatory activities.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 3 and 4

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

P.1, P.5 and R.4

Type: Design/drawing/plan/sketch
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 40%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Patternmaking participation in class including preparation for weekly classes, and in-class progress 10 1 P.1
Patternmaking research journal demonstrates accuracy, rigor and care, including important annotations for weekly tasks and sourced imagery. 20 3 R.4
Finished pattern demonstrates your ability to translate patternmaking skills consistently and accurately including all technical marks and information. 20 4 P.5
Construction participation in class including preparation for weekly classes and in-class progress 10 1 P.1
Construction research journal demonstrates accuracy, rigor and care including important notes, sourced images and samples for weekly tasks. 20 3 R.4
Completed 'Fashion Box Top demonstrates your ability to translate foundational construction skills, into a quality garment outcome, with care taken for how it is presented. 20 4 P.5
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Minimum requirements

Minimum 80% class attendance is required.

Recommended texts

You may find any or all of these texts helpful. They are in the UTS Library.

Aldrich, W. 2008, Metric Pattern Cutting for Women's Wear, 5th ed., Blackwell Publishing, Oxford

Aldrich, C. 2007, Fabric, Form and Flat Pattern Cutting, 2nd ed., Blackwell Publishing, Oxford

Assembil, How Patterns Work: The Fundamental Principles of Patternmaking & Sewing in Fashion Design

Barnfield, J. & Richards, A. 2012, Pattern Cutting Primer, Bloomsbury, London

Cole, J. & Czachor, S. 2009, Professional Sewing Techniques for Designers, Fairchild Books, New York

Fischer, A. 2009, Basics: Fashion Design 03: Construction, AVA Publishing, Switzerland.
Liechty, E. Pottberg, D. Rasband, J. 2006, Fitting & Pattern Alteration: A Multi-Method Approach, Fairfield Fashion & Merchandising Group, New York.
McKelvey, K. 2006, Fashion Source Book, 2nd ed., Blackwell Science.
Shaeffer, C. 2001, Sewing for the Apparel Industry, Prentice Hill, New Jersey
Shaeffer, C.B. 2001, The Couture Sewing Techniques, Taunton Press.
Singer, 2009, The Complete Photo Guide to Sewing, Creative Publishing International, Minneapolis
Skills Institute Press, Illustrated Guide to Sewing: A Complete Course on Making Clothing for Fit and Fashion, Fox Chapel Publishing, East Petersburg.
Smith, A. 2009, The Sewing Book, DK Publishing, New York
Sorger, R. & Udale, J. 2006, The Fundamentals of Fashion Design, AVA Publishing, Switzerland
Stecker, P. 2009, The Fashion Design Manual 2, Palgrave Macmillan, South Yarra.
Szkutnicka, B. 2010, Technical Drawing for Fashion, Laurence King Publishing Ltd, London.

Visit: https://createspace.com/4128493
Order for Kindle or iPad If you would prefer to purchase a digital version of the book for Kindle or iPad you will find links to these versions via our website: www.assembil.com

References

WEB RESOURCES USED IN THIS SUBJECT

VOGUE RUNWAY http://www.vogue.com/fashion-shows

THE CUTTING CLASS
http://thecuttingclass.com

UTS FASHION VIDEOS
https://vimeo.com/utsfashion/videos

Other resources are advised as necessary, via UTSOnline and emai