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83001 Fashion and Textile Design Special Project

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Design, Architecture and Building: Design
Credit points: 6 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

Description

This subject presents students with an opportunity to study abroad and enhance their awareness of fashion and textiles within a broader cultural context. This travel experience allows students to comprehend global and cultural contexts for fashion and understand their relevance within the site-specific context of Florence, Italy. The project enriches students' understanding of creative, industrial and cultural issues for fashion, and students are inspired by Florence's history, industry and position in the global fashion context. Learning may include but is not limited to independent and self-directed activity framed by a structured program of studio-based tutorials/workshops alongside site visits and exposure to industry in Florence. Students are expected to fulfil assessment requirements that include presentations, research and design outcomes. Students require approval from the fashion and textiles course director to enrol in this subject.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

On successful completion of this subject, students should be able to:

1. Behave ethically and responsibly within communities outside of the studio.
2. Demonstrate curiosity and understanding of international communities and cultures.
3. Generate research and creative approaches for fashion design problems inherent to Florence
4. Foster and develop an original aesthetic sensibility through working with materials and creating an accessory
5. Curate and present research in media relevant to fashion design
6. Develop a practice for fashion research outside of the studio and an enquiring approach to design
7. Collect and curate relevant research that informs your design practice

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes to the following Course Intended Learning Outcomes:

  • Awareness of social and ethical responsibilities (A.2)
  • Ability to collaborate and work with others, including within diverse social and cultural contexts (C.1)
  • Development of an original aesthetic sensibility (I.1)
  • Ability to speculate, experiment, challenge boundaries and take risks (I.2)
  • Ability to undertake in-depth research, including both visual and written forms (R.1)
  • Ability to construct well-supported arguments and rationale (R.2)
  • Ability to reflect on practice and research (R.3)
  • Capacity to interpret complex ideas (R.4)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

The term CAPRI is used for the five Design, Architecture and Building faculty graduate attribute categories where:

C = communication and groupwork

A = attitudes and values

P = practical and professional

R = research and critique

I = innovation and creativity.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs) are linked to these categories using codes (e.g. C-1, A-3, P-4, etc.).

Teaching and learning strategies

Studio workshops Students will particpate in studio workshops, guided by Polimoda technical and design staff, during these studio-based workshops students will learn how to work with leather materials, relevant leather working machinery, and techniques for making leather bags and accessories. These design and systems workshops are crucial in ensuring students can deploy the design thinking and technical expertise required in this subject.

Lectures Lectures will be delivered by Polimoda staff in a studio setting where student discussion and participation is encouraged. Lecture series will refer to intersections of culture and fashion inherent to Florence and that align to the subject’s overarching themes, activities and learning methods. These lecture series inform students learning and knowledge of the

Site Visits This subject will consist of several site visits which are designed to inform students understanding of the cultural, industrial and historical setting of Florence. Students are to make their own way to several locations. Site visits are supported by continual learning activities within the studio sessions and content delivered by Polimoda staff and UTS tutor for the subject.

Project Based Learning The curriculum uses project-based learning activities to provoke participatory discussions. For this reason, studio, in conjunction with the lectures, use a progressive, sequential project-based approach to design. All students are expected to attend all lecture and studio sessions, and follow suggested learning patterns and activities. Students are also encouraged to participate actively in the group discussions that occur during the studio sessions.

Formative feedback will be provided during the learning process, typically provided verbally by the subject's teaching staff. It will address the content of work and a student's approach to learning, both in general and more specific ‘assessment orientated’ terms. It is designed to help students improve their performance in time for the submission of an assessment item. For this to occur students need to respond constructively to the feedback provided. This involves critically reflecting on advice given and in response altering the approach taken to a given assessment. Formative feedback may also, on occasion, be provided by other students. It is delivered informally, either in conversation during a tutorial or in the course of discussion at the scale of the whole class. It is the student’s responsibility to record any feedback given during meetings or studio sessions.

Content (topics)

This subject will address the following issues and topics:

Fashion History

Contemporary Fashion

Aesthetics / Menswear

Craft to Business

Textile Science

Accessories Design

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Journal and Conceptual Design Development

Intent:

Students are required to document the Global Studio across several media including a written journal and gathering of ephemera, digital images and videography. Students are also required to engage in all discussions, studios, site visits and immerse themselves within the cultural experience of being in Florence and document this. This documentation is also required to outline the development of the conceptual grounding for the object design that they will be undertaking in Assessment Task 2. Further Assessment Task details and information is outlined within the brief which is a separate document accessible on UTSonline.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 5, 6 and 7

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

A.2, I.2, R.1, R.3 and R.4

Type: Portfolio
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 50%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Images, vidoes and reflections shows self-intiated and responsible engagement with studios, visits and other workshops undertaken 20 1 A.2
The documentation displays development of individual visual presentation skills 20 5 R.1
Images, videos and other documentation of the experience in Florence, shows curiosity and focus as a research method. 20 6 I.2
Quaity of the written analysis of images, films and other collected documentation. 20 6 R.3
Documentation has been expanded through other media including illustration, text and further research 20 7 R.4
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Design Outcome

Intent:

Designed outcomes for this assessment task is a body accessory displaying a clear synthesis and sensitivity to cultural, industrial and contemporary fashion intersections that are inherent to Florence. Designed accessories are to engage with the body, be positioned within a global contemporary fashion context and call upon the skills learned in the experience of studying in Florence. Focus for this assessment task is on the conceptual underpinnings of the designed object and these are to be expanded within written and visual communication in accompanying media. Further Assessment Task details and information is outlined within the brief which is a separate document accessible on UTSonline.

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

2, 3, 4, 6 and 7

This task also addresses the following course intended learning outcomes that are linked with a code to indicate one of the five CAPRI graduate attribute categories (e.g. C.1, A.3, P.4, etc.):

C.1, I.1, I.2, R.1, R.2 and R.3

Type: Project
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 50%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Designed accessory displays a synthesis of complex ideas in relation to fashion (cultural/historical/industrial) that you have engaged with during your time in Florence 16 7 R.3
Visual interpretation of accessory displays a clarity and synthesis of complex ideas including cultural, historical and industrial concepts inherent to Florence. 14 4 R.1
Accessory displays a relationship to the body. 14 6 I.2
Accessory displays an aesthetic sensitivity and materiality is considered. 14 4 I.1
Accessory shows a clear conceptual focus that is informed by the experience of studying in Florence. 14 2 C.1
Written explanation of the designed outcome is clear and clarifies the conceptual relationship between concepts and the finished object. 14 7 R.2
Appropriate technical approaches have been employed in the creation of the accessory 14 3 I.2
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Minimum requirements

The DAB attendance policy requires students to attend no less than 80% of formal teaching sessions (lectures and tutorials) for each class they are enrolled in to remain eligible for assessment.