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68002 Advanced Nanomaterials

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2019 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Science: Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Credit points: 6 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

The aim of this coursework subject is to develop students' awareness and competency in the specific components of nanoscience and nanotechnology relevant to material-related research. It combines topics in nanostructures and nanomaterials with the necessary foundations that underlie the nanoscience and technology of materials. The subject covers topics selected from: nanomaterials synthesis and characterisation, advanced spectroscopic techniques, surface science, optical characterisation and modelling techniques, technology transfer from the laboratory to the industrial world.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:

1. understand and apply the relevant terminology and concepts of the topics presented
2. apply advanced physical concepts in order to solve scientific problems in the field of nanomaterials and nanotechnology
3. analyse and explain the relevance of physical concepts to nanoscience and nanotechnology applications
4. extract, assess, and synthesise information drawn from journal publications in the field of nanotechnology.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the development of following course intended learning outcomes:

  • Disciplinary knowledge and its appropriate application (1.0)
  • An inquiry-oriented approach (2.0)
  • Professional skills and their appropriate application (3.0)
  • Communication skills (6.0)
  • Initiative and innovative ability (7.0)

Contribution to the development of graduate attributes

The Faculty of Science has determined that our courses will aim to develop a range of attributes in students at the completion of their course of study. This subject has been designed to develop the following attributes, using the learning strategies outlined in the next section. Many of these attributes will be developed through most activities and assessments - for specific details please refer to the individual assessments.

1. Discipline knowledge and its appropriate application
a. A well-founded knowledge in the fields of nanomaterials and nanotechnology
b. An appreciation of the application of disciplinary practice through activities including tutorials and case studies
c. An understanding of how the knowledge can be put into context
These attributes will be developed through engagement with and reflection on subject material in all activities.

2. inquiry-oriented approach
a. Ability to undertake methodical analysis of problem solving
b. Ability to apply critical reasoning to issues through informed judgement
These will attributes will be developed through engagement with critical analysis in case studies and a methodical approach to problem-based assignments.

3. Professional skills and their appropriate application
a. Skills in accessing information from various sources including the Internet and the library
b. Ability to collect, analyse and organise information and ideas
c. Ability to learn and work independently
These attributes will be developed by preparing case studies and developing answers for topical assignments.

6. Communication skills
a. Ability to convey ideas clearly and fluently in the written form
b. Ability to present a physically based argument
The first will be developed in all activities, particularly presentations, and the second in assignments and problem-solving aspects of tests.

7. Initiative and innovative ability
a. Ability to find solutions to problems, innovate and improve current practices

This attribute is developed and assessed through assessment task 1 in the 'pitch'. A pitch may stand out above the others if it has an innovative component (for example in style of presentation, business proposition or science content).

Teaching and learning strategies

The subject consists of 3 modules, each comprising up to 12 hours of lectures designed to develop disciplinary knowledge and its application in the fields of nanomaterials and nanotechnology, at a level suitable for Honours students. These modules will be drawn from the research expertise in the School.

One 3-hour combined lecture/tutorial per week will be run throughout the Session. You will read material from UTSonline and other sources and/or progress ongoing investigations as directed by the lecturer before attending class. Face-to-face meetings will be used to develop answers for assessment, by discussing concepts, solution strategies, and technical knowledge; and receive immediate verbal feedback from mentor and peers. The collaborative activities will depend on the nature of the content and assessment, but could include brainstorming research questions or industry pitches, developing mathematical models, and implementing computer simulations. You are expected to continue your learning in your own time, and will have the opportunity to receive feedback from the lecturer on a draft or outline.

Content (topics)

This subject combines topics in nanostructures and nanomaterials with the necessary foundations in physics and material science. The content of this subject will cover three modules drawn from the following list. 12 hours of contact time will be dedicated to each module.

a. Nanostructures and nanofabrication: nanowires; quantum dots and wells; quantum confinement; fundamentals, properties and applications of nanostructures; available nanofabrication techniques including vapour-liquid-solid growth, electron beam lithography, photolithography, electron beam induced deposition, chemical vapour condensation and focused ion beam

b. Surface physics and surface analysis techniques: structure and electronic properties of solid surfaces; surface reconstruction; adsorption of atoms and molecules; electron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption techniques for surface characterisation, synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy

c. Optical modelling and its applications to nanomaterials: methods for simulating optical properties of materials; poles and resonances; differential equation solvers, applications to nanomaterials and nanodevices

d. Optical properties and spectroscopy of nanomaterials: optical properties of nanomaterials; absorption and emission; principles of optical spectroscopy; theoretical considerations; available characterisation techniques including ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescence, cathodoluminescence, ellipsometry; equipment configurations and instrumentation; specimen preparation; applications to nanomaterials

e. Case studies in technology transfer: concept and process of technology transfer from laboratory to industry; examples in the fields of nanomaterials and nanotechnology; success factors; project management; transfer strategy and implementation

f. Electron beam induced growth, processing and analysis of nanostructured materials: adsorption, desorption and diffusion at solid surfaces; electron interactions with gases, solids and adsorbates; electron beam induced processing: microstructure modification, etching & deposition; techniques for imaging and analysis of electron induced processes in low, high and ultra-high vacuum environments; gas-mediated thermal and ion beam induced processing

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Materials fabrication and characterisation

Intent:

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following graduate attributes:

1. Disciplinary knowledge and its appropriate application

6. Communication skills

7. Initiative and innovative ability

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

1, 3 and 4

This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):

1.0, 6.0 and 7.0

Type: Laboratory/practical
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 33.34%
Criteria:

Assessment of the practical component will be conducted by the lecturer based on the student's understanding and successful application of the lecture material in the laboratory environment.

Assessment task 2: Measurement of optical properties

Intent:

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following graduate attributes:

1. Disciplinary knowledge and its appropriate application

2. An Enquiry-oriented approach

3. Professional skills and their appropriate application

6. Communication skills

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

1, 2 and 4

This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):

1.0, 2.0, 3.0 and 6.0

Type: Report
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 33.33%
Criteria:

Are based on demonstrated attainment of the graduate attributes, especially being able to mesh diverse information and apply it to understanding problems in nanotechnology and nanomaterials. Submissions will be judged on the ability to clearly articulate scope and context, the appropriate selection of key strategies or themes, the depth of reasoning applied, and the soundness of the conclusions.

Assessment task 3: Nonlinear optics journal article analysis

Intent:

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following graduate attributes:

1. Disciplinary knowledge and its appropriate application

6. Communication skills

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

1 and 2

This assessment task contributes to the development of course intended learning outcome(s):

1.0 and 6.0

Type: Presentation
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 33.33%
Criteria:

Presentations will be assessed by the lecturer on the basis of demonstrated attainment of the graduate attributes, especially discipline-specific knowledge of the topics presented and understanding of relevant terminology, techniques and processes.

Recommended texts

Teaching resources will be drawn from a variety of sources including textbooks, the Internet and journal articles. Reading recommendations will be advised by the lecturers.