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49678 Reliability Availability and Maintainability

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2020 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Engineering: Information, Systems and Modelling
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Postgraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

Description

Effectiveness of engineered systems is often judged by the extent to which they fulfil their intended purpose. For this to happen a system must be available when required and be able to be used reliably, consistent with operational needs. This subject explores the concepts of Reliability, Availability and Maintainability (RAM), and the relationships between them. RAM directly affect the effectiveness of a system. The approach taken to understanding the concepts include a treatment of each of the factors separately, together with a consideration of the relationships between them, so that a systemic view of RAM is obtained. Students are encouraged to consider the applicability of concepts and techniques used to their own experience in system acquisition and support.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:

1. Demonstrate the importance of the concepts of RAM in the context of systems and system life cycles,
2. Define and use the appropriate measures associated with each of the concepts,
3. Ensure that RAM concerns are effectively considered in the system acquisition and development cycles,
4. Demonstrate familiarity with RAM engineering and management processes,
5. Use the RAM tools and techniques considered in the subject.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the development of the following faculty Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs) and Engineers Australia (EA) Stage 1 competencies:

  • Identify, interpret and analyse stakeholder needs (A.1)
  • Establish priorities and goals (A.2)
  • Identify constraints, uncertainties and risk of the system (social, cultural, legislative, environmental, business etc.) (A.3)
  • Apply systems thinking to understand complex system behaviour including interactions between components and with other systems (social, cultural, legislative, environmental, business etc.) (A.5)
  • Identify and apply relevant problem-solving methodologies (B.1)
  • Synthesise alternative/innovative solutions, concepts and procedures (B.3)
  • Apply decision-making methodologies to evaluate solutions for efficiency, effectiveness and sustainability (B.4)
  • Demonstrate research skills (B.6)
  • Manage own time and processes effectively by prioritising competing demands to achieve personal goals (Manage self) (D.1)
  • Reflect on personal and professional experiences to engage in independent development beyond formal education for lifelong learning (D.2)
  • Communicate effectively in ways appropriate to the discipline, audience and purpose (E.1)
  • Be aware of global perspectives (needs, rules/regulations, and specifications) (F.4)

Teaching and learning strategies

Concepts and techniques are introduced in a series of core lectures and problem based class discussions, supplemented as appropriate by case studies and assignments.

Content (topics)

The topics discussed in this subject include:

  • Reliability - component and system
  • Reliability growth, evaluation and tools
  • Software reliability
  • Importance Measures
  • Maintainability - preventive and corrective
  • Reliability centred maintenance
  • Availability
  • RAM Management

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Individual Assignment 1

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1, 2 and 5

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes (CILOs):

A.1, A.2, A.5, B.1, B.4 and B.6

Type: Report
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 30%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Evidence of research and synthesis of material 33 1, 2 A.5, B.6
Correctness of solutions 33 5 A.2, B.1, B.4
Evidence of contextualising material with practice 34 1, 2 A.1, A.5, B.6
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Individual Assignment 2

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1, 2, 3 and 5

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes (CILOs):

A.1, A.2, A.5, B.1, B.4, B.6 and E.1

Type: Report
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 30%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Evidence of research and synthesis of material 25 1, 2 A.5, B.6
Correctness of solutions 25 2, 5 A.2, B.1, B.4
Evidence of contextualising material with practice 25 1, 2 A.1, A.5, B.6
Clarity and appropriateness of responses 25 1, 3 E.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 3: Individual Assignment 3

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1, 2, 3, 4 and 5

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes (CILOs):

A.1, A.2, A.3, A.5, B.1, B.3, B.4, B.6, E.1 and F.4

Type: Report
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 30%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Correctness of solutions 50 2, 5 A.2, B.1, B.4
Evidence of Evidence of contextualising RAM in a systemic context 50 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 A.1, A.3, A.5, B.1, B.3, B.4, B.6, E.1, F.4
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 4: Reflection

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1, 2, 3 and 4

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes (CILOs):

D.1, D.2, E.1 and F.4

Type: Reflection
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 10%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Evidence of contextualising material with own experience 50 1, 2, 3, 4 D.1, D.2, E.1, F.4
Evidence of critical engagement with material 50 1, 2, 3, 4 D.1, D.2, E.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Minimum requirements

In order to pass this subject, a student must achieve an overall mark of 50% or more.

Required texts

There are no required textbooks for this subject.

Recommended texts

A useful reference for this subject is:

Blanchard B (2004), Logistics Engineering and Management, Pearson Prentice Hall.

References

Langford, John W, Logistics: Principles and Application, McGraw-Hill, 1995 Blanchard, B S, Logistics Engineering and Management, Pearson International, 6th edn, 2004 MIL-STD 756B, Reliability Modeling and Prediction, 1981 (or latest update) Samaniego, F and Cohen, M, Reliability Issues for DoD Systems, National Academies Press, Washington, 2002 Selected papers from Reliability Engineering and System Safety, especially those on common-mode failures. A text on statistical modelling of reliability (tba) Selected papers on the engineering of maintainability. Selected standards in the IEC Dependability Management series, UTS Library 658.562/DEPE Smith, D J, Reliability, Maintainability and Risk, Butterworth Heinmann, 7th edn, 2005, UTS Library 620.00452/SMIT Defence Standard 00-40, Reliability and Maintainability, MOD UK Defence Standard 00-60, Integrated Logistics Support, MOD UK

The Lectures & Reading Material (LRM) and the Lecture Support Notes (LSN)

The LRM may be purchased from the Union Shop in Building 1. It comprises a set of readings that cover the topics considered in this subject. The readings are keyed to various topics as indicated in the LRM. Please note that from time to time additional readings that may be of interest to you may be placed online. Check on the UTS Online announcements page for purchasing details.

The LSN contains copies of the overheads used in the lectures. PDF versions of these will be available via UTS Online Learning Resources folder. You are encouraged to download these for your use during the lecture blocks.

Other resources

UTSOnline (www.online.uts.edu.au) is a web-based learning tool used in many UTS subjects. It can be accessed from inside and outside UTS via most web-browsers.

This subject will make use of UTSOnline as a means of communication between teaching staff and students. You should be registered automatically if you have enrolled correctly. If you wish to receive email notices you must change the default email address to the address where you wish to receive mail (Note: all students have a UTS email account).

Students need to familiarise themselves with UTSOnline. Announcements will be made using this facility. Students are expected to regularly check the announcements page for information.

How do I log in to UTSOnline?

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