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49028 Policy and Planning of Energy Conservation

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2019 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Engineering: Systems, Management and Leadership
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Postgraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

Energy conservation is an important aspect of energy planning and policy analysis. This subject introduces students to the rationale and context for energy conservation planning and policy; historical perspective of energy conservation; public and private sector interventions and mechanisms for rationalising the design of energy conservation policies; examples and case studies of energy conservation programs at national, sectoral and enterprise levels in developing and industrialised countries; and decision methods for program design.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:

1. Describe the rationale, nature, characteristics, and criticality of energy conservation.
2. Explain basic concepts, principles and frameworks for assessing energy conservation potential.
3. Analyse factors influencing energy consumption.
4. Assess the comparative effectiveness of energy policies aimed at conserving energy.
5. Analyse and critically appraise energy conservation policies and programs.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the development of the following faculty Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs) and Engineers Australia (EA) Stage 1 competencies:

  • Identify, interpret and analyse stakeholder needs (A.1)
  • Apply principles of sustainability to create viable systems (A.4)
  • Apply systems thinking to understand complex system behaviour including interactions between components and with other systems (social, cultural, legislative, environmental, business etc.) (A.5)
  • Identify and apply relevant problem-solving methodologies (B.1)
  • Synthesise alternative/innovative solutions, concepts and procedures (B.3)
  • Implement and test solutions (B.5)
  • Demonstrate research skills (B.6)
  • Apply abstraction, mathematics and/or discipline fundamentals to analysis, design and operation (C.1)
  • Manage own time and processes effectively by prioritising competing demands to achieve personal goals (Manage self) (D.1)
  • Reflect on personal and professional experiences to engage in independent development beyond formal education for lifelong learning (D.2)
  • Communicate effectively in ways appropriate to the discipline, audience and purpose (E.1)
  • Appreciate ethical implications of professional practice (F.2)
  • Understand cross-cultural issues (regions or workplaces) (F.3)
  • Be aware of global perspectives (needs, rules/regulations, and specifications) (F.4)

Teaching and learning strategies

This subject is offered in block mode, involving three (two day each) modules, spread over a 12 week session.

Each block follows a similar structure, in that students are required to access pre-class review of subject reading/viewing material on UTSOnline. The material is designed to enable students to engage in meaningful discussions in class. Communication is integral to each class and the pre-reading material informs these conversations.

In class, students will have a formal lecture to re-assess understanding of concepts and methods and their applications in real-life situations using case studies. Students engage in extensive consultations to complete set exercises. These exercises provide opportunities for developing an understanding of concepts and methods relevant to the subject. They also provide opportunities for critical evaluation of presented information. Assignments are issued in each Block and are to be handed in before the next Block so that verbal feedback and relevant examples can be provided to guide each Block. Each Block follows an assignment and feedback, hence increasing understanding and increased opportunity for feedback. The assignments are designed to test students’ ability to apply concepts and methods in specific contexts, analyse policy trade-offs and, develop constructive critique. Quizzes are designed to assess knowledge and understanding of subject content. By completing these before each Block, students will receive verbal feedback on their progress in the following Block.

Content (topics)

  1. Policy and planning context for energy conservation
  • Definition and interpretation of energy conservation
  • Rationale behind conservation
  • Historical perspective and experience
  • Institutional context
  • Overview of selected measures and interventions in the public and private sectors

  1. Conceptual backdrop
  • Energy Efficiency V Energy Productivity V Energy Intensity – physical and economic perspectives
  • Technical V Economic V Market potential for energy conservation

  1. Methodologies for analysing energy consumption changes
  • Concepts, Energy decomposition approaches
  • Disaggregated V Aggregated analyses at sectoral (industrial, transportation, commercial, residential, and agricultural sectors), regional, national and global levels
  • Analyses of factors influencing energy use
  • Assessment of the potential for energy conservation

  1. Policy frameworks for promoting energy conservation
  • Regulatory V Market-oriented V hybrid – foundations, concepts, procedures, impacts
  • Sectoral, regional, national and global contexts
  • Behavioural response at the consumer level – monitoring the effects of conservation

  1. Case studies

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Assignment 1

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1, 2 and 3

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes (CILOs):

A.1, B.1, B.3, B.5, B.6, C.1, D.1 and E.1

Type: Exercises
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 15%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Relevance of discussion/evidence 25 1, 2, 3 A.1, B.1, B.5
Depth of research 25 1, 2, 3 B.3, B.6, D.1
Degree of insights 25 1, 2, 3 B.3, C.1
Succinctness of writing 25 1, 2, 3 E.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 2: Quiz 1

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1, 2 and 3

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes (CILOs):

A.1, B.1, B.3, B.5, C.1 and D.1

Type: Quiz/test
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 20%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Relevance of discussion 50 1, 2, 3 A.1, B.1, B.3, B.5
Correctness of solutions 50 1, 2, 3 C.1, D.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 3: Assignment 2

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1 and 4

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes (CILOs):

A.1, A.4, A.5, B.6, D.1, D.2, E.1, F.3 and F.4

Type: Exercises
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 15%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Relevance of discussion/evidence 25 1, 4 A.1, A.4, A.5
Depth of research 25 1, 4 B.6, D.1
Degree of insights 25 1, 4 D.2, F.3, F.4
Succinctness of writing 25 1, 4 D.2, E.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 4: Quiz 2

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1 and 4

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes (CILOs):

A.1, A.4, A.5, C.1, F.3 and F.4

Type: Quiz/test
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 20%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Relevance of discussion 50 1, 4 A.1, A.4, F.3, F.4
Correctness of solutions 50 1, 4 A.5, C.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 5: Assignment 3

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1 and 5

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes (CILOs):

A.1, A.4, B.3, B.6, D.1, D.2, E.1, F.2, F.3 and F.4

Type: Exercises
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 20%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Relevance of discussion/evidence 25 1, 5 A.1, A.4
Depth of research 25 1, 5 B.6, D.1
Degree of insights 25 1, 5 B.3, D.2, F.2, F.3, F.4
Succinctness of writing 25 1, 5 D.2, E.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Assessment task 6: Class Participation

Intent:

To demonstrate students’ participation to critically engage with materials covered in this subject, and their ability to confidently engage in meaningful discussion in the class.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses the following subject learning objectives (SLOs):

1, 2, 3, 4 and 5

This assessment task contributes to the development of the following course intended learning outcomes (CILOs):

E.1

Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 10%
Criteria linkages:
Criteria Weight (%) SLOs CILOs
Contribution to and participation in discussions 100 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 E.1
SLOs: subject learning objectives
CILOs: course intended learning outcomes

Required texts

None prescribed. Selective lecture notes, journal articles and other readings are provided below.

References

Ang (2004), Decomposition analysis for policy making in energy: which is the preferred method?, Energy Policy 32, 1131-1139.

Ang (2006), Monitoring changes in economy-wide energy efficiency: From energy-GDP ratio to composite efficiency index, Energy Policy 34(5), 574-582.

Berndt, Ernst R. (1978) Aggregate Energy, Efficiency, and Productivity Measurement, Annual Rev. Of Energy, 1978: 3, pp.225-73.

Croucher, M. (2011), Potential problems and limitations of energy conservation and energy efficiency, Energy Policy, Vol. 39, pp.5795-5799.

Hirst, Eric; Marlay, Robert; Greene, David; and Barnes, Richard (1983) Recent Changes in U.S. Energy Consumption: What Happened and Why, Annual Rev. of Energy, 1983:8, pp.193-245.

IEA (1997), Indicators of energy use and efficiency: Understanding the link between energy and human activity, International Energy Agency, Paris.

Patterson, Murray G (1996) What is energy efficiency? Concepts, indicators and methodological issues, Energy Policy, Vol. 23, No. 5, pp. 377-390.

Sandu, S. and Petchey, R. (2009), End use energy intensity in the Australian economy, ABARE research report 09.17, Canberra.

Sorrel, S.; O’Malley, E.; Schleich, J.; and Scott, S. (2004), The economics of energy efficiency: barriers to cost-effective investment, Edward Elgar, Cheltenham, UK.

Sorrell, S. (2009), Jevons’ Paradox revisited: The evidence for backfire from improved energy efficiency, Energy Policy, Vol. 37, pp.1456-1469.

Tanaka, Kanako (2008) Assessing measures of energy efficiency Performance and their Application in Industry, International energy agency, Paris.

Wirl, Franz (1997) The Economics of Conservation Programs, Kluwer Academic Publishers, London.